Type of partnerships:

There are many different types of student partnership (which may also be referred to as collaborative programmes) and some may be hybrids of the main types of partnership outlined below. In addition, each type of partnership may have variations in how it can be delivered and the requirements that therefore apply.

Please note that from May 2017 the University will normally only consider entering into select types of new partnerships, listed below. For completeness also listed below are types of partnerships that we currently have but will not normally set up as new partnerships.  Also note that when considering a new partnership proposal, be aware that the University does not approve joint, double or dual awards for individual students or dual awards for taught programmes, and only exceptionally will it enter into arrangements for accreditation or franchise.  It should be noted that the University is not permitted to enter into serial arrangements (eg it is not permitted to validate a partner programme if the partner then contracts with a third party to support or deliver the learning or to provide facilities). Joint supervision agreements, leading to a single degree from us or the partner Institution, are exempted from this restriction.

Partnerships types that the University will consider (from May 2017):

Articulation

Articulation: An arrangement in which students who successfully complete a programme or part of a programme at a partner institution are able to transfer onto an Aberdeen programme, usually at an advanced stage (e.g. direct entry to year 2 of a UG degree). Articulations usually include credit transfer, so elements of the partner programme contribute to the Aberdeen award. Students who articulate on to an Aberdeen programme are classified in the same way as students who undertake the entire programme at Aberdeen; students are therefore required to undertake the final 2 years as a minimum at Aberdeen in order to be given an Honours degree. Students do not remain registered with the partner once at Aberdeen and only Aberdeen makes the final award. (If the partner also makes an award, see Double Degree.)

Requires: Articulations require approval following the University's agreed Procedure and require a signed, legally binding Agreement in place before students may be admitted.

Double Degree

Double Degree: An arrangement in which Aberdeen and one (or more if a multiple degree) partners deliver a programme with two (or more) interdependent awards. All partners must have degree-awarding powers. The regulations of both (all) partners apply so students must meet the award requirements of both (all) partners. Students are normally required to spend time studying at both partners; the requirement of the University of Aberdeen is that Aberdeen will deliver at least 50% of a double degree. Each of the partners issues a certificate and the UK certificate must be explicit in naming the partners and the collaborative nature of the award.

Double degrees can take many forms including double taught postgraduate awards (e.g. 1+1+1 sandwich); double PhD awards (this is equivalent to one PhD, not two, and is often set up where the partners do not have joint-degree-awarding powers); and articulations to double undergraduate awards (e.g. 2+2 honours; 3+1 designated), which is where the partner chooses to also award a degree even though the student has articulated to Aberdeen (this type of double degree is equivalent to one undergraduate degree, not two).

Requires: Double Degrees require approval following the University's agreed Procedure and require a signed, legally binding Agreement in place before students may be admitted.

International Exchange

International Exchange: is an arrangement in which students from Aberdeen undertake a period of study at an international higher education institution. The agreement is reciprocal and numbers exchanged between the Aberdeen and the partner should be equivalent over a 3–5 year period. The study programme for each student is agreed by both institutions. Students continue to pay fees to their home institution and not to the host. (Compare with Study Abroad; see also European Exchange.)

Requires: International Exchanges require approval following the University's agreed Procedure and require a signed, legally binding Agreement in place before students may be admitted.

Erasmus

Erasmus: Exchanges with European institutions are organized under the Erasmus scheme.

Study Abroad

Study Abroad: An arrangement in which students registered at an international higher education institution undertake a period of study at Aberdeen. The study programme for each student is agreed by both institutions and students are required to pay fees to Aberdeen.

Requires: Study Abroad requires approval following the University's agreed Procedure and requires a signed, legally binding Agreement in place before students may be admitted.

Joint Supervision

Joint Supervision/Cotutelle: An arrangement for an individual PhD student or small single cohort. The student is supervised by a Supervisor at Aberdeen and by a Supervisor at a partner institution. The student may or may not spend time at the partner institution. Generally, the University will only enter into joint supervision arrangements when it can be shown that relevant expertise does not exist at Aberdeen. (Compare with Split-Site PhD.)

Requires: PhD Joint Supervisions/Co-tutelles leading to a single degree from one of the partners only do not require University approval but do require a signed, legally binding Agreement in place before the joint supervision commences. A Template Agreement is available.

 

Transnational Education (TNE)

Transnational Education (TNE) can refer to a number of different collaborative arrangements but most often refers to the establishment of an overseas campus to deliver a University's programmes and make awards. The establishment of an overseas campus can include a number of arrangements such as the use of Delivery Partners and in-country teaching and might also include joint delivery or award with a partner degree-awarding institution.

Delivery Partner Provision Requires: The establishment of an overseas campus will be managed through a Project Board. The Project Board will oversee the complex planning and negotiations involved, ensure adequate due diligence is undertaken and that the relevant University approval that is required at various stages takes place, including but not limited to the approval of the Quality Assurance Committee, UCTL, Senate and Court. The procedures for the Project Board to follow are detailed in the Delivery Partners' Principles and Procedures Handbook. A signed, legally binding Agreement is required to be in place before students may be admitted and separate legally binding Agreements will be required for any programmes delivered in partnership as part of the TNE (e.g. Joint Degrees).

Student elective/internship

Elective, Internship, Placement: An arrangement in which Aberdeen students undertake a period of study or work at another higher education institution or private company or in industry, for example, which is a requirement for the successful completion of their programme.

Requires: Electives/Internships/Placements do not require University approval but most require an Agreement in place before students are put on placement.  Templates for Internships are available from the Careers Service.

 

Partnerships types that are not normally considered (from May 2017):

Distance Programme

Distance Programme: This involves the delivery of an Aberdeen programme to cohorts of students using the premises and/or facilities of another organisation. Aberdeen retains control of the delivery and the teaching, which is usually delivered on-line from Aberdeen, and academic support. The partner institution may provide some administrative support but will not provide supervision, teaching, academic support or student services, which will be provided by Aberdeen. The host institution is responsible for providing facilities such as study space and IT facilities and students have access to Aberdeen library and support facilities. A single award is made by Aberdeen. (See also Franchise and Split-Site Programme.)

Dual Degree

Dual Degree: An arrangement that is similar to a Double Degree but for which the overall study period is longer and volume of learning greater than for either of the awards individually, but typically shorter than if each of the programmes of study had been taken consecutively. All partners must have degree-awarding powers and normally the regulations of both (all) partners apply so students must meet the award requirements of both (all) partners. Students are normally required to spend time at studying at both partners and it is expected that Aberdeen will deliver at least 50% of a programme for which students achieve a dual degree. Each of the partners issues a certificate and the UK certificate must be explicit in naming the partners and the collaborative nature of the award. (Compare with Double Degree and Joint Degree.)

Franchise

Franchised Provision: is the process by which the University authorises a partner organisation, a 'Delivery Partner', to deliver on behalf of the University one or more programmes of study developed by Aberdeen and leading to University of Aberdeen awards. Normally, the partner organisation will deliver the learning and assessment, student support and provide facilities. Variants include delivery being shared between the University and the partner institution, with the University having responsibility for programme delivery, perhaps with 'flying faculty' and delegating the provision of student support and learning resources to the partner organisation. In all variants of Franchised Provision, Aberdeen's academic regulations, policies and procedures apply. Students on franchised programmes are full students of Aberdeen, as well as of the partner. The award is made by Aberdeen and Aberdeen remains responsible for the quality of the award and of the student experience. (Compare with Validation.)

Joint Degree

Joint Degree: An arrangement in which Aberdeen and one or more partners deliver one programme with one award. All partners must have joint-degree-awarding powers. One of the partners will act as the lead institution and this partner will be responsible for statutory reporting and co-ordinating the programme. Students may spend time at both (all) partners or be based at just one. The Joint Degree programme is developed jointly with a single set of regulations that all partners agree to, and a single award is made jointly by Aberdeen and the partner institutions(s). The partners jointly issue a single certificate which must be explicit in naming the partners and the joint nature of the award. Because of the requirement to have a single set of regulations, Joint Degrees for taught programmes can be highly complex both to set up and to manage. (Compare with Double Degree and Joint Delivery.)

Joint Delivery

Joint Delivery: An arrangement in which Aberdeen and one or more partners collaborate to jointly deliver a programme. Students will undertake courses delivered by some or all of the partners and will receive the award from one (their 'home') institution. Each of the partners will count the credit delivered by others towards their own award. The programme is developed jointly and will often be based on existing courses pooled together to form a unique programme. Joint procedures apply but each of the partners applies its own regulations. Such arrangements are often linked to funding. (Compare with Joint Degree and Double Degree.)

 

Joint Supervision/Co-tutelle leading to a Double, Dual or Joint PhD. . Students enrolled on double/dual/joint PhD degrees are required to be registered as PhD students with Aberdeen for the full duration of their programme and are often required to undertake two examinations, in close succession, particularly where the regulations of the partners differ significantly. Generally, the University will only enter into joint, double or dual degree arrangements for individual students when the requirement for such a degree is linked to funding. (See also Double Degree and Joint Degree.

Split-Site PhD

Split-Site PhD refers to an arrangement whereby PhD students undertake part of their research at an approved partner institution, which is normally another degree-awarding body. The student remains registered with Aberdeen throughout, pays fees to Aberdeen throughout, and receives an award from Aberdeen only. The partner may provide on-sight supervision only or full joint supervision of the student's PhD. Split-Site PhDs are normally set up as reciprocal Agreements whereby Aberdeen and a partner institution agree that PhD students registered at either of the institutions may undertake part of their research at the partner. (Compare with Joint Supervision.)

Validated Provision

Validated Provision: is an arrangement in which a programme (or part of a programme) developed and delivered by another organisation is validated by Aberdeen to lead to an Aberdeen award. Aberdeen will evaluate the programme and the partner's delivery of the programme (teaching, support and facilities) to ensure that it is of an equivalent standard and quality as its own. Validations may include the provision of all or just some of the teaching services, student support and facilities by the partner. Aberdeen's academic regulations, policies and procedures apply to validated programmes. Students on validated programmes are full students of Aberdeen, as well as of the partner. The award is made by Aberdeen and Aberdeen remains responsible for the quality of the award and of the student experience.