News and Forthcoming Events

Previous Events

On 20 February 2015, the Centre co-hosted the following workshop with the Centre for Medical Humanities:

‘Plague: Depictions and Effects’

Invited external speaker: Dr Aoibheann Nic Dhonnchadha, School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, `Irish Treatises on Plague in 15th-Century Medical Manuscripts’

University of Aberdeen speakers: Professor David Dumville, Respondent (Celtic & Anglo-Saxon Studies/History), Dr Timothy Baker (English), ‘Infection in the Sentence: Twenty-First-Century Plague-Writing’, and Dr William Tuladhar-Douglas (Divinity & Religious Studies), ‘Zoonosis and Witches’

On Tuesday 3 February 2015, Dr Elizabeth Boyle, Department of Early Irish, Maynooth University, Ireland, delivered The John Strachan of Keith Memorial Lecture in Celtic and Gaelic Studies, 2014/15. The title of her lecture was:

‘Conservatism, Colonialism & Celtic Studies: The Life and Scholarship of Whitley Stokes in the 1880s’

 

 

On Friday, 5 December 2014, Dr Timothy Bolton, Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon historian, delivered The Agnes Jane Robertson Memorial Lecture. The title of his lecture was

Canute as a European statesman: his role in European politics, 1016-1035

Canute was the Dane who conquered Anglo-Saxon England; he involved himself in the affairs of North Britain, as well as creating a Scandinavian empire

 

 

Strachan Memorial Lectures

The Centre for Celtic Studies organises and hosts academic events including the annual John Strachan of Keith Memorial Lecture in Celtic and Gselic Studies, to commemorate the eminent scholar of Old Gaelic who was born and raised in nearby Keith, and who studied and taught at the University of Aberdeen.  This event is open to all, and is usually held in May. 

Some past Strachan Memorial Lectures: 

2013

Professor Seosamh Watson

´╝łUniversity College Dublin´╝ë

‘Boats, bibles and boyans: Gaelic language and lore in Easter Ross’

 

2012

Dr Anthony Harvey

(Royal Irish Academy, Dublin) 

 ‘Virgilius Maro Grammaticus and Muirchú maccu Machthéni: literary chalk and cheese in  seventh-century Ireland?’