Professor Frans de Vries
Professor Frans de Vries

Professor Frans de Vries

Chair in Environmental and Resource Economics

About
S27 Edward Wright Building
Old Aberdeen Campus
Dunbar Street
AB24 3QY

View on Map

Biography

Frans de Vries is Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics at the Department of Economics, University of Aberdeen Business School.

His research is centered around the design and functioning of environmental markets and incentive-based policy mechanisms for pollution control and biodiversity conservation. Another focal point of his research relates to the interplay between environmental policy and technological innovation.

Dr. De Vries joined the University of Aberdeen in the autumn of 2021. Prior to that he has held academic positions at the University of Stirling in Scotland, and the Universities of Groningen and Tilburg in the Netherlands.

Qualifications

  • PhD Environmental Economics 
    2003 - University of Groningen 
  • MSc Economics of Agriculture and Environment 
    1996 - Wageningen University 

Memberships and Affiliations

Internal Memberships

Scottish Experimental Economics Laboratory (SEEL)

Aberdeen Centre for Research in Energy Economics and Finance (ACREEF)

External Memberships

European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (EAERE)

European Economic Association (EEA)

Scottish Economic Society (SES)

North Atlantic Microplastic Centre (NAMC)

Latest Publications

  • Ecological and Economic Implications of Alternative Metrics in Biodiversity Offset Markets

    Simpson, K., de Vries, F., Dallimer, M., Armsworth, P., Hanley, N.
    Conservation Biology, e13906
    Contributions to Journals: Articles
  • Enhancing Spatial Coordination in Payment for Ecosystem Services Schemes with Non-Pecuniary Preferences

    Kuhfuss, L., Préget, R., Thoyer, S., de Vries, F., Hanley, N.
    Ecological Economics, vol. 192, 107271
    Contributions to Journals: Articles
  • Understanding the Performance of Biodiversity Offset Markets: Evidence from An Integrated Ecological-Economic Model

    Simpson, K., de Vries, F., Dallimer, M., Armsworth, P., Hanley, N.
    Land Economics, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 836-857
    Contributions to Journals: Articles

View My Publications

Research

Research Overview

Environmental Economics
Environmental Policy and Technological Change
Resource and Energy Economics
Industrial Organisation

Current Research

Investment Incentives in Tradable Emissions Markets with Price Floors

Conditionally accepted at the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists

with Tim Cason and John Stranlund

Abstract:  Emissions uncertainty has led regulators to include price controls in many cap-and-trade markets. We study how these controls affect firms’ incentives to invest in new abatement technologies in a model with abatement cost uncertainty. Price floors increase investment incentives because they raise the expected benefits from lowering abatement costs. We also report a market experiment that features abatement cost uncertainty and the opportunity for cost-reducing investment, with and without a price floor. Trade occurs through a continuous double auction market. Consistent with the theoretical model, investment is significantly greater with the price floor in place. Emissions permit prices also respond as predicted to abatement investments and emissions shocks.


Clear Skies: Multi-Pollutant Climate Policy in the Presence of Global Dimming

with Matthew McGinty

Abstract:  Multi-pollutant interactions can have crucial implications for the design and performance of environmental policy targeting single pollutants. This paper presents a two-region model where a global pollutant (CO2) and local pollutant (SO2) are produced jointly. The interaction between SO2 and CO2 gives rise to the global dimming effect, which relates SO2 emissions to the environmental damage caused by CO2 emissions. We analyze climate policy by comparing abatement of these pollutants in the presence and absence of the dimming effect. We then draw implications for the design of international climate agreements, which should reflect the interactive nature between pollutants. The paper also illustrates how a market-based policy in the form of emissions taxes can be embedded into climate agreements to facilitate an efficient coordination of multi-pollutant abatement across regions. Our model predicts that this involves a uniform tax on the global pollutant but differentiated (region-specific) taxes on the local pollutant.


Equity Preferences and Abatement Cost Sharing in International Environmental Agreements

with Tobias Börger, Nick Hanley, Robert Johnston, Keila Meginnis, Tom Ndebele and Ghamz E Ali Siyal

Abstract:  This paper examines empirically the importance of equity preferences for the formation of international environmental agreements (IEAs) for transboundary pollution control. While it has been shown theoretically that the existence of equity preferences among countries considering an IEA increases the chances for formation and stability of a coalition, empirical assessment of such preferences are limited to climate change mitigation and to single-country studies. We consider the case of marine plastic pollution as a transboundary pollution control problem of increasing concern, with properties that lead to distinct considerations for equity and sharing of abatement costs. We employ a coordinated choice experiment in the United Kingdom and United States to assess preferences for abatement cost allocations in a marine plastics IEA. Pairs of cooperating countries and relative allocation of abatement costs are varied experimentally. Results show systematic aversion to both advantageous and disadvantageous inequality with respect to abatement costs, but also that the relative strength of advantageous and disadvantageous inequality aversion differs across countries. Across both countries, there is evidence that left-leaning voters generally favour more equal international sharing of abatement costs. Differences of these results from the case of greenhouse gas emission reduction, and implications for current efforts to establish a legally binding global treaty on marine plastic pollution, are discussed.

Supervision

Current Ph.D. student: Jessica Hood

Funding and Grants

Current Grants

  • The Economics of Marine Plastic Pollution: What are the Benefits of International Cooperation? - Principal Investigator, ESRC-funded project (June 2019 - April 2023)
Teaching

Courses

Publications

Page 1 of 1 Results 1 to 3 of 3

  • Ecological and Economic Implications of Alternative Metrics in Biodiversity Offset Markets

    Simpson, K., de Vries, F., Dallimer, M., Armsworth, P., Hanley, N.
    Conservation Biology, e13906
    Contributions to Journals: Articles
  • Enhancing Spatial Coordination in Payment for Ecosystem Services Schemes with Non-Pecuniary Preferences

    Kuhfuss, L., Préget, R., Thoyer, S., de Vries, F., Hanley, N.
    Ecological Economics, vol. 192, 107271
    Contributions to Journals: Articles
  • Understanding the Performance of Biodiversity Offset Markets: Evidence from An Integrated Ecological-Economic Model

    Simpson, K., de Vries, F., Dallimer, M., Armsworth, P., Hanley, N.
    Land Economics, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 836-857
    Contributions to Journals: Articles