International Trade Law, LLM

International Trade Law, LLM

Introduction

International trade law is an exciting and highly competitive field of law. At Aberdeen we’ve combined the teaching and research strength of our long-established law school and the calibre of our first-class teaching team with our growing international profile and activity to create options for this new LLM.

Study Information

Study Options

Learning Mode
On Campus Learning
Degree Qualification
LLM
Duration
12 months or 24 months
Study Mode
Full Time or Part Time
Start Month
September or January
Subject marketing image

Economic globalisation and recent world events, including Brexit and trade wars, have thrown a spotlight on the issues, challenges and complexities of international trade and trade negotiation. We offer a specialist LLM programme in this area with career opportunities for skilled and ambitious lawyers with broad and transferable skills to continue to grow. This programme includes a dissertation to further develop your academic and research skills. This degree is alternatively available with a professional skills option (instead of dissertation) with the opportunity to further develop your professional skills in international trade negotiation at a summer course on campus.

This programme is also available to study online.

Available Programmes of Study

You will gain a thorough foundation in a broad range of topics engaging with different aspects of international trade law. You will supplement this with a range of optional courses designed to give you a wide perspective and cater to your personal interests and career goals.

You will also prepare a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic of your choice in the field of international trade law.

Please note: Students staring their LLM programme in January write their Dissertation project during the Summer semester.

International Trade Law

Qualification Duration Learning Mode Study Mode Start Month Location  
LLM 12 months or 24 months On Campus Learning Full Time or Part Time January View

Programme Information

Semester 1

Semester 1

For January start students, the first semester covers courses with the prefix LS55.

Information for part-time students: This route will run over three academic years. Candidates normally take 30 credit points in Academic Year 1, 120 credit points in Academic Year 2, and 30 credit points in Academic Year 3. LS551T and PD5506 must be taken in Year 1, and both LS553V and LS5904 must be taken in Year 2. Candidates must take the following. They can be taken in either Year 1 or Year 2 or 3: LS508A and LS553V. Candidates must take a remaining 60 credit points. At least 60 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed below. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus course.


Compulsory Courses

All students must complete:

  • PD5506: Getting Started at the University of Aberdeen
  • LS558A: International Trade and Finance Law

Note: Students may select LS5098 (World Trade Organisation: Gatt) in semester 3 instead of LS553V if they so wish.

Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship (LS551T)

This compulsory course provides students from diverse legal and educational backgrounds with a common understanding of the core research, analytical, and writing skills which would be required to excel in LLM-Taught courses. It commences with a few lectures and progresses to working in a workshop environment and finally to the submission of an individual assignment. It also incorporates elements such as library workshops to provide students with hands-on experience with the resources available for course and dissertation work.

View detailed information about this course
World Trade Organisation: Gatt (LS553V)

30 Credit Points

The course aims to provide a thorough and critical understanding of fundamental concepts, principles and institutions of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), with emphasis on trade in goods (GATT). The main topics covered include relevant historical and institutional developments, WTO dispute resolution, core principles such as the non-discrimination, most-favour-nation (MFN) and the prohibition of quantitative restrictions on international trade. The security, environment, human rights, labour standards, economic emergencies and free trade areas and customs unions based exceptions and their challenges are also analytically explored. These are studied in light of relevant WTO panel and Appellate Body cases and recommendations.

View detailed information about this course

Optional Courses

In addition to the above candidates must take courses to the value of 60 credit points. At least 30 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed in the optional course sections of semester 1 and 3. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus Law course.

Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions (LS552K)

30 Credit Points

When international commercial lawyers work with contracts, those contracts often engage parties from multiple countries with differing legal perspectives on how to interpret that same singular contract. This course is designed to enable commercial lawyers to understand how various legal traditions provide their own unique perspectives on a variety of contractual issues. The course will explore how different aspects of contract law can lead to unexpected differences or similarities across national legal cultures, enabling an international commercial lawyer to coordinate those issues for their clients. The course will focus on a variety of European legal systems, with additional discussions drawn from transnational contract law instruments such as the Principles of European Contract Law and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

View detailed information about this course
International Arbitration: Energy & Natural Resources (LS552Z)

30 Credit Points

The complex interaction between investment protection and the sovereign right of states to regulate has been most acute in the energy sector. On the one hand, investors require strong guarantees that states will respect the “rules of the game” that constitute the basis of their investments. On the other, states can be tempted to interfere with foreign energy investments because of their particular strategic and social importance. This course aims to analyse if existing investment disciplines are adapted to the specific regulatory risks that investors face in the energy landscape of the 21st Century.

View detailed information about this course
Applied Issues in International Economic Law (LS553T)

30 Credit Points

Why this Course?There is limited appreciation given to the study of the state as a policymaker, legislator, and disputing party in the context of international economic law. Yet, the states have become the “investor of first-resort", while participating in an unprecedented surge of international investment disputes and international economic agreements (i.e., CETA, USMCA, EU-Singapore, and EU-Japan).

For example, the course covers how international investment law interacts with the State’s regulatory powers to protect public health, a timely topic in light of COVID-19.

International Economic Organizations are also crucial actors of international economic law as their powers have expanded over recent years. Challenges to these powers have also appeared, including pressure on their immunities and political division among members.

As a result, interactions between these actors are becoming increasingly numerous and complex. This calls for a course with a comparative and practice-oriented renewed approach to international economic law.

Would this course contribute to my professional growth?

Students aiming to work as policymakers, government officials, legal practitioners, and researchers will use a comparative methodology to understand the similar issues arising in investment and trade law. By using contemporary case-studies, students will be able to clearly articulate their learning on most of the complex issues arising from the application of international economic law. The course will have emphasis on the study and analysis of investment standards such as non-discrimination, most-favorable treatment, fair and equitable treatment, expropriation, and standards of compensation.

What is the course objective?

The objective of this module is to give students a competitive advantage at understanding the "real-life" consequences of the state as the "main economic actor” by elucidating some of the most frequent pervasive issues arising from international investment law and dispute resolution.

It will also allow students to focus on under-noticed developments of international development law. The analysis of the case-law of bodies such as anti-fraud sanctions processes or accountability mechanisms will permit students to understand underlying dynamics that go beyond the organization concerned and impact other fields of international economic law.

The course content is also relevant for students interested in applying investment and trade law from an interdisciplinary perspective by studying, for example, the role of preferential tariffs and subsidies in delivering low-carbon economies.

Seminars will employ different methodologies to learn the impact of economic law in politics and business, including cases on plain packaging and non-communicable diseases, public procurement, corruption, and international labour law standards rigorously.

What is the crucial contribution of this course to my LLM?

This is a crucial module at building knowledge across the architecture of investment, trade, and development agreements by focusing on the institutional intersections across economic and legal organisations such as the World Bank, IMF, WTO, and ICSID. Students will benefit from the innovative teaching method on “Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Lab” where they can contribute to test ideas on the unresolved challenges arising from dispute settlements mechanisms, including experiences from WTO to the ISDS Reform currently lead by the United Nations at the UNCITRAL WG III.

Moreover, given the comparative methodologies used, this course offers an excellent added value to all students seeking continuity into further postgraduate studies, including Ph.D. studies in the field of international economic law, international investment law, and international dispute resolution.

View detailed information about this course
International Food Law (LS553Y)

30 Credit Points

This course explores the diversity of laws and policies that shape our food system. It considers crucial legal issues applicable to the access, production, processing, packaging, marketing, consumption and disposal of food such as food sovereignty, food security, right to food, intellectual property rights relating to food, food safety, food waste as well as the food -water -energy- land nexus. The course, delivered through seminars, encourages debates, critical thinking and formulation of opinions on the complex and often controversial issues covered. Seasoned guest speakers are invited to enrich the student’s knowledge and experience. Whilst the course focuses on the international and UK systems, relevant examples from other jurisdictions are employed.

View detailed information about this course
Trade Marks and Brand Development (LS5584)

30 Credit Points

This course tracks the ongoing interactions between trade mark and related laws on the one hand and the social and commercial practices of branding on the other. Through the use of cases and contemporary examples throughout, the course views trade mark and related laws within their historical, current, and developing social and commercial contexts. It offers a critical view of certain developments in the laws, their roles in and responses to the evolving practices of branding. It provides students with both an analytical and a practical view on the protection of trade mark and related rights.

View detailed information about this course
Commercialising Innovation and Law (LS5595)

30 Credit Points

Students will explore the diversity of laws and practices relevant to commercialising innovation. We will consider patents, trade secrets, copyright and database rights, new business models, competition, natural resources and activities in developing areas. Visiting speakers from practice and industry are regularly invited. In the first session, students develop an innovative idea, as a base for discussion in each session. Seminars involve individual and group work, and the preparation of posters.

View detailed information about this course
Semester 2

Semester 2

The compulsory dissertation provides the opportunity to research and explore in more detail a specific legal area of your choice.

Please note that all January Start Students must produce their Dissertation Project during the Summer Semester, preparation for which begins in January.


Compulsory Courses
Master of Laws Dissertation (LS5904)

60 Credit Points

Between May and mid-August students prepare a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice related to their specialist LLM programme. Students are instructed through the delivery of a preparatory lecture, two supervisory meetings and a two hour dissertation planning workshop in a small group setting. Students are expected to spend considerable time on independent research throughout the course of the dissertation module, including; preparation of dissertation plan, amendment of plan in accordance with supervisory comments, preparation for the dissertation workshop, and, of course, in the final 10,000 word dissertation itself.

View detailed information about this course
Semester 3

Semester 3

In September, January start students will take courses starting with LS50


Compulsory Courses
  • LS5098: World Trade Organization - GATT (students may alternatively select to do the January version of this course, LS553V, instead).

Optional Courses

In addition to the above candidates must take courses to the value of 60 credit points. At least 30 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed in the optional course sections of semester 1 and 3. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus Law course.

International Energy and Environmental Law (LS501C)

30 Credit Points

The course deals with the regulation of international activities regarding energy and the environment. The course will consider the international legal framework regarding energy sources, and it will look at the various legal instruments at the global and regional level as well as the key actors that are involved in regulation. It will also examine environmental issues that correspond to the generation and use of energy in the international context and the responses relating to environmental protection of soil, water, air, atmosphere and species.

View detailed information about this course
Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions (LS502K)

30 Credit Points

When international commercial lawyers work with contracts, those contracts often engage parties from multiple countries with differing legal perspectives on how to interpret that same singular contract. This course is designed to enable commercial lawyers to understand how various legal traditions provide their own unique perspectives on a variety of contractual issues. The course will explore how different aspects of contract law can lead to unexpected differences or similarities across national legal cultures, enabling an international commercial lawyer to coordinate those issues for their clients. The course will focus on a variety of European legal systems, with additional discussions drawn from transnational contract law instruments such as the Principles of European Contract Law and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

View detailed information about this course
International Intellectual Property: Framework and Challenges (LS502L)

30 Credit Points

Students will explore the diverse elements of law which constitute international intellectual property law. We will consider the historical development of international intellectual property rights, framework of international treaties and organisation, copyright (with a particular focus on new developments in the digital age), geographical indications, patents and designs. Throughout the course, the challenge is to identify conflicts and synergies, and areas for future development, through regard to cases, scholarship, and the activities of policy makers and activists. Assesment is by an essay, an individual presentation and discussion board submissions. Description: The course considers key issues relating to international intellectual property law which may vary from year to year consistent with the legal and social evolution of the fields; the course will explore copyright, geographical indications, patents, designs, and their relationship with regional and international treateis and international organisation; key themes will be drawn together in a practical presentation session.

View detailed information about this course
Introduction to Corporate Finance Law (LS503N)

15 Credit Points

This is a compulsory law course for the LLM/MSc in Corporate Finance. It will provide a grounding for those who are new to law (including corporate finance law), while also offering deeper understanding to those who have previously studied law. The course will focus on key areas related to the specific field of corporate finance law in order to assist students with their studies in related courses. The course will principally focus on the laws of the UK (including English law and Scots law, where appropriate) but will also feature a notable comparative law element.

View detailed information about this course
International Commercial Arbitration (LS5083)

30 Credit Points

The demand for international commercial arbitration has increased significantly over the last 20 years. Empirical surveys conducted consistently report figures that suggest around 60% of businesses prefer arbitration over other dispute resolution methods. This course provides students with a solid understanding of how arbitration works both in principle and in practice. Topics covered include the arbitration agreement, arbitral jurisdiction, the arbitral tribunal, applicable laws in arbitration, the arbitral procedure, and challenging and enforcing awards. Change Course Description to The demand for international commercial arbitration has increased significantly over the last 20 years. Empirical surveys conducted consistently report figures that suggest around 60% of businesses prefer arbitration over other dispute resolution methods. Hence, it is becoming more and more important for law students to get acquainted with the international arbitration framework. This course explores the theoretical and practical underpinnings of arbitral law and provides students with a holistic view on different aspects of the arbitral procedure. The main substantive topics are: (1) The Role of the Seat, (2) Arbitration Agreement and Arbitral Jurisdiction, (3) Applicable Substantive Law, (4) The Arbitral Tribunal, (5) Arbitral Procedure and Evidence, (6) The Arbitral Award. The topics have been chosen to give students a good knowledge of international commercial arbitration law. The teaching pattern comprises recorded lectures and seminars at which the above-mentioned topics are discussed in depth. Besides the essential reading for the lectures, students are provided with relevant case law and different scenarios/questions for discussion at seminars. The course also provides a lecture on the introduction to international commercial arbitration.

View detailed information about this course

Programme Fees

Fee information
Fee category Cost
EU / International students £22,400
Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year
Home / RUK £11,500
Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year
LLM 12 months or 24 months On Campus Learning Full Time or Part Time September View

Programme Information

Semester 1

Semester 1

Information for part-time students: This route will run over two academic years minimum. Candidates can take up to 120 credit points in an academic year. LS501T and PD5006 must be taken in Year 1, and LS5904 must be taken in Year 2. Candidates must take the following. They can be taken in either Year 1 or Year 2: LS558A and LS553V. Candidates must take a remaining 60 credit points. At least 60 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed below. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus course.


Compulsory Courses

All students must complete:

  • PD5006: Getting Started at the University of Aberdeen
  • LS5098: World Trade Organization - GATT (this course can also be taken in semester 2 [LS553V]).
Critical Legal Thinking and Scholarship (LS501T)

This compulsory course provides students from diverse legal and educational backgrounds with a common understanding of the core research, analytical, and writing skills which would be required to excel in LLM-Taught courses. It commences with a few lectures and progresses to working in a workshop environment and finally to the submission of an individual assignment. It also incorporates elements such as library workshops to provide students with hands-on experience with the resources available for course and dissertation work.

View detailed information about this course

Optional Courses

In addition to the above candidates must take courses to the value of 60 credit points. At least 30 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed in the optional sections of semesters 1 and 2. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus Law course.

International Energy and Environmental Law (LS501C)

30 Credit Points

The course deals with the regulation of international activities regarding energy and the environment. The course will consider the international legal framework regarding energy sources, and it will look at the various legal instruments at the global and regional level as well as the key actors that are involved in regulation. It will also examine environmental issues that correspond to the generation and use of energy in the international context and the responses relating to environmental protection of soil, water, air, atmosphere and species.

View detailed information about this course
Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions (LS502K)

30 Credit Points

When international commercial lawyers work with contracts, those contracts often engage parties from multiple countries with differing legal perspectives on how to interpret that same singular contract. This course is designed to enable commercial lawyers to understand how various legal traditions provide their own unique perspectives on a variety of contractual issues. The course will explore how different aspects of contract law can lead to unexpected differences or similarities across national legal cultures, enabling an international commercial lawyer to coordinate those issues for their clients. The course will focus on a variety of European legal systems, with additional discussions drawn from transnational contract law instruments such as the Principles of European Contract Law and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

View detailed information about this course
International Intellectual Property: Framework and Challenges (LS502L)

30 Credit Points

Students will explore the diverse elements of law which constitute international intellectual property law. We will consider the historical development of international intellectual property rights, framework of international treaties and organisation, copyright (with a particular focus on new developments in the digital age), geographical indications, patents and designs. Throughout the course, the challenge is to identify conflicts and synergies, and areas for future development, through regard to cases, scholarship, and the activities of policy makers and activists. Assesment is by an essay, an individual presentation and discussion board submissions. Description: The course considers key issues relating to international intellectual property law which may vary from year to year consistent with the legal and social evolution of the fields; the course will explore copyright, geographical indications, patents, designs, and their relationship with regional and international treateis and international organisation; key themes will be drawn together in a practical presentation session.

View detailed information about this course
Introduction to Corporate Finance Law (LS503N)

15 Credit Points

This is a compulsory law course for the LLM/MSc in Corporate Finance. It will provide a grounding for those who are new to law (including corporate finance law), while also offering deeper understanding to those who have previously studied law. The course will focus on key areas related to the specific field of corporate finance law in order to assist students with their studies in related courses. The course will principally focus on the laws of the UK (including English law and Scots law, where appropriate) but will also feature a notable comparative law element.

View detailed information about this course
International Commercial Arbitration (LS5083)

30 Credit Points

The demand for international commercial arbitration has increased significantly over the last 20 years. Empirical surveys conducted consistently report figures that suggest around 60% of businesses prefer arbitration over other dispute resolution methods. This course provides students with a solid understanding of how arbitration works both in principle and in practice. Topics covered include the arbitration agreement, arbitral jurisdiction, the arbitral tribunal, applicable laws in arbitration, the arbitral procedure, and challenging and enforcing awards. Change Course Description to The demand for international commercial arbitration has increased significantly over the last 20 years. Empirical surveys conducted consistently report figures that suggest around 60% of businesses prefer arbitration over other dispute resolution methods. Hence, it is becoming more and more important for law students to get acquainted with the international arbitration framework. This course explores the theoretical and practical underpinnings of arbitral law and provides students with a holistic view on different aspects of the arbitral procedure. The main substantive topics are: (1) The Role of the Seat, (2) Arbitration Agreement and Arbitral Jurisdiction, (3) Applicable Substantive Law, (4) The Arbitral Tribunal, (5) Arbitral Procedure and Evidence, (6) The Arbitral Award. The topics have been chosen to give students a good knowledge of international commercial arbitration law. The teaching pattern comprises recorded lectures and seminars at which the above-mentioned topics are discussed in depth. Besides the essential reading for the lectures, students are provided with relevant case law and different scenarios/questions for discussion at seminars. The course also provides a lecture on the introduction to international commercial arbitration.

View detailed information about this course
Semester 2

Semester 2

Compulsory Courses
  • LS558A: International Trade and Finance Law

Note: LS5098 (World Trade Organisation: Gatt) can also be taken in semester 1 in lieu of LS553V.

World Trade Organisation: Gatt (LS553V)

30 Credit Points

The course aims to provide a thorough and critical understanding of fundamental concepts, principles and institutions of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), with emphasis on trade in goods (GATT). The main topics covered include relevant historical and institutional developments, WTO dispute resolution, core principles such as the non-discrimination, most-favour-nation (MFN) and the prohibition of quantitative restrictions on international trade. The security, environment, human rights, labour standards, economic emergencies and free trade areas and customs unions based exceptions and their challenges are also analytically explored. These are studied in light of relevant WTO panel and Appellate Body cases and recommendations.

View detailed information about this course
Optional Courses

In addition to the above candidates must take courses to the value of 60 credit points. At least 30 credit points must be obtained from the courses listed in the optional sections of semesters 1 and 2. The remaining credit points may be obtained from any LLM 30 credit on campus Law course.

Comparative Contract Law for International Transactions (LS552K)

30 Credit Points

When international commercial lawyers work with contracts, those contracts often engage parties from multiple countries with differing legal perspectives on how to interpret that same singular contract. This course is designed to enable commercial lawyers to understand how various legal traditions provide their own unique perspectives on a variety of contractual issues. The course will explore how different aspects of contract law can lead to unexpected differences or similarities across national legal cultures, enabling an international commercial lawyer to coordinate those issues for their clients. The course will focus on a variety of European legal systems, with additional discussions drawn from transnational contract law instruments such as the Principles of European Contract Law and the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods.

View detailed information about this course
International Arbitration: Energy & Natural Resources (LS552Z)

30 Credit Points

The complex interaction between investment protection and the sovereign right of states to regulate has been most acute in the energy sector. On the one hand, investors require strong guarantees that states will respect the “rules of the game” that constitute the basis of their investments. On the other, states can be tempted to interfere with foreign energy investments because of their particular strategic and social importance. This course aims to analyse if existing investment disciplines are adapted to the specific regulatory risks that investors face in the energy landscape of the 21st Century.

View detailed information about this course
Applied Issues in International Economic Law (LS553T)

30 Credit Points

Why this Course?There is limited appreciation given to the study of the state as a policymaker, legislator, and disputing party in the context of international economic law. Yet, the states have become the “investor of first-resort", while participating in an unprecedented surge of international investment disputes and international economic agreements (i.e., CETA, USMCA, EU-Singapore, and EU-Japan).

For example, the course covers how international investment law interacts with the State’s regulatory powers to protect public health, a timely topic in light of COVID-19.

International Economic Organizations are also crucial actors of international economic law as their powers have expanded over recent years. Challenges to these powers have also appeared, including pressure on their immunities and political division among members.

As a result, interactions between these actors are becoming increasingly numerous and complex. This calls for a course with a comparative and practice-oriented renewed approach to international economic law.

Would this course contribute to my professional growth?

Students aiming to work as policymakers, government officials, legal practitioners, and researchers will use a comparative methodology to understand the similar issues arising in investment and trade law. By using contemporary case-studies, students will be able to clearly articulate their learning on most of the complex issues arising from the application of international economic law. The course will have emphasis on the study and analysis of investment standards such as non-discrimination, most-favorable treatment, fair and equitable treatment, expropriation, and standards of compensation.

What is the course objective?

The objective of this module is to give students a competitive advantage at understanding the "real-life" consequences of the state as the "main economic actor” by elucidating some of the most frequent pervasive issues arising from international investment law and dispute resolution.

It will also allow students to focus on under-noticed developments of international development law. The analysis of the case-law of bodies such as anti-fraud sanctions processes or accountability mechanisms will permit students to understand underlying dynamics that go beyond the organization concerned and impact other fields of international economic law.

The course content is also relevant for students interested in applying investment and trade law from an interdisciplinary perspective by studying, for example, the role of preferential tariffs and subsidies in delivering low-carbon economies.

Seminars will employ different methodologies to learn the impact of economic law in politics and business, including cases on plain packaging and non-communicable diseases, public procurement, corruption, and international labour law standards rigorously.

What is the crucial contribution of this course to my LLM?

This is a crucial module at building knowledge across the architecture of investment, trade, and development agreements by focusing on the institutional intersections across economic and legal organisations such as the World Bank, IMF, WTO, and ICSID. Students will benefit from the innovative teaching method on “Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) Lab” where they can contribute to test ideas on the unresolved challenges arising from dispute settlements mechanisms, including experiences from WTO to the ISDS Reform currently lead by the United Nations at the UNCITRAL WG III.

Moreover, given the comparative methodologies used, this course offers an excellent added value to all students seeking continuity into further postgraduate studies, including Ph.D. studies in the field of international economic law, international investment law, and international dispute resolution.

View detailed information about this course
International Food Law (LS553Y)

30 Credit Points

This course explores the diversity of laws and policies that shape our food system. It considers crucial legal issues applicable to the access, production, processing, packaging, marketing, consumption and disposal of food such as food sovereignty, food security, right to food, intellectual property rights relating to food, food safety, food waste as well as the food -water -energy- land nexus. The course, delivered through seminars, encourages debates, critical thinking and formulation of opinions on the complex and often controversial issues covered. Seasoned guest speakers are invited to enrich the student’s knowledge and experience. Whilst the course focuses on the international and UK systems, relevant examples from other jurisdictions are employed.

View detailed information about this course
Trade Marks and Brand Development (LS5584)

30 Credit Points

This course tracks the ongoing interactions between trade mark and related laws on the one hand and the social and commercial practices of branding on the other. Through the use of cases and contemporary examples throughout, the course views trade mark and related laws within their historical, current, and developing social and commercial contexts. It offers a critical view of certain developments in the laws, their roles in and responses to the evolving practices of branding. It provides students with both an analytical and a practical view on the protection of trade mark and related rights.

View detailed information about this course
Commercialising Innovation and Law (LS5595)

30 Credit Points

Students will explore the diversity of laws and practices relevant to commercialising innovation. We will consider patents, trade secrets, copyright and database rights, new business models, competition, natural resources and activities in developing areas. Visiting speakers from practice and industry are regularly invited. In the first session, students develop an innovative idea, as a base for discussion in each session. Seminars involve individual and group work, and the preparation of posters.

View detailed information about this course
Semester 3

Semester 3

The compulsory dissertation provides the opportunity to research and explore in more detail a specific legal area of your choice.


Compulsory Courses
Master of Laws Dissertation (LS5904)

60 Credit Points

Between May and mid-August students prepare a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice related to their specialist LLM programme. Students are instructed through the delivery of a preparatory lecture, two supervisory meetings and a two hour dissertation planning workshop in a small group setting. Students are expected to spend considerable time on independent research throughout the course of the dissertation module, including; preparation of dissertation plan, amendment of plan in accordance with supervisory comments, preparation for the dissertation workshop, and, of course, in the final 10,000 word dissertation itself.

View detailed information about this course

Programme Fees

Fee information
Fee category Cost
EU / International students £22,400
Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year
Home / RUK £11,500
Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year

We will endeavour to make all course options available; however, these may be subject to timetabling and other constraints. Please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

How You'll Study

The LLM International Trade Law with Dissertation has flexibility built in. The programme is structured to allow you the freedom to specialise within international commercial law, yet explore its many aspects. Teaching is organised on a modular basis with a dissertation to be submitted at the end of August each year.

Learning Methods

  • Individual Projects
  • Lectures
  • Research
  • Seminars
  • Workshops

Assessment Methods

Within the taught element of the programme, i.e. the 4 courses which the students undertake, a range of forms of assessment are found: such as written examination, individual and group oral presentation and essays. In addition, between May and mid-August, students prepare a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of their choice related to their specialist LLM programme.

Why Study International Trade Law?

  • The School of Law is ranked Top 100 for Law by The Times Higher Education World University Subject Ranking 2022.
  • A foundation discipline in 1495, today our Law School is considered one of the UK’s elite training grounds for lawyers.
  • A highly-respected Centre for Commercial fostering research excellence in international trade law and offers unique research activities by serving as a dynamic hub for law academics, legal practitioners, those working in related professions, industry representatives, activists and policymakers, providing opportunities for synergy and rich engagement
  • The calibre, experience, and enthusiasm of the strong academic team, challenging you with complex, realistic scenarios as you get to grips with this fascinating and fast-growing area.
  • Taught by our teaching team that includes legal practitioners with extensive real-world experience.
  • The resources of the award-winning Sir Duncan Rice Library and Taylor Law Library, with a first-class collection of reference works in law and related subjects.

Entry Requirements

Qualifications

The information below is provided as a guide only and does not guarantee entry to the University of Aberdeen.

Normally a 2(1) honours degree in Law (or another related discipline) or equivalent

Please enter your country to view country-specific entry requirements.

English Language Requirements

To study for a Postgraduate Taught degree at the University of Aberdeen it is essential that you can speak, understand, read, and write English fluently. The minimum requirements for this degree are as follows:

IELTS Academic:

OVERALL - 6.5 with: Listening - 5.5; Reading - 6.0; Speaking - 5.5; Writing - 6.0

TOEFL iBT:

OVERALL - 90 with: Listening - 17; Reading - 21; Speaking - 20; Writing - 21

PTE Academic:

OVERALL - 62 with: Listening - 59; Reading - 59; Speaking - 59; Writing - 59

Cambridge English B2 First, C1 Advanced or C2 Proficiency:

OVERALL - 176 with: Listening - 162; Reading - 169; Speaking - 162; Writing - 169

Read more about specific English Language requirements here.

Document Requirements

You will be required to supply the following documentation with your application as proof you meet the entry requirements of this degree programme. If you have not yet completed your current programme of study, then you can still apply and you can provide your Degree Certificate at a later date.

Degree Transcript
a full transcript showing all the subjects you studied and the marks you have achieved in your degree(s) (original & official English translation)
Personal Statement
a detailed personal statement explaining your motivation for this particular programme

Fee Information

Additional Fee Information

  • Fees for individual programmes can be viewed in the Programmes section above.
  • In exceptional circumstances there may be additional fees associated with specialist courses, for example field trips. Any additional fees for a course can be found in our Catalogue of Courses.
  • For more information about tuition fees for this programme, including payment plans and our refund policy, please visit our InfoHub Tuition Fees page.

Scholarships

Eligible self-funded international Masters students will receive the Aberdeen Global Scholarship. Visit our Funding Database to find out more and see our full range of scholarships.

Careers

International trade law and policy has a direct impact on all aspects of the economy. This programme is particularly relevant for those seeking a career or currently working in the public sector in the area of international trade or diplomacy, politics, businesses involved in export or import of goods, industry associations, lawyers in government departments or in-house counsel and non-governmental organisations with interest on trade and sustainable development issues. This programme is also relevant for those seeking an academic career in international trade law.

There are many opportunities at the University of Aberdeen to develop your knowledge, gain experience and build a competitive set of skills to enhance your employability. This is essential for your future career success. The Careers and Employability Service can help you to plan your career and support your choices throughout your time with us,

We are Top 100 in the World for Law

Our Law School is ranked in the Top 100 globally, according to the Times Higher Education World University Subject Rankings 2022.

5th in the UK for Law

Our Law School is ranked 5th in the UK of 105 providers for Overall Student Satisfaction (National Student Survey 2022).

Our Experts

These will include members of the Centre for Commercial Law.

Programme Coordinator
Burcu Yuksel

Information About Staff Changes

You will be taught by a range of experts including professors, lecturers, teaching fellows and postgraduate tutors. Staff changes will occur from time to time; please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

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