English and German (5 years), MA

English and German (5 years), MA

Introduction

English and German at Aberdeen gives you all the advantages of the UK’s second most highly-rated research hub for English literature, language and creative writing. You will study this programme within a European, historical and contemporary context through top-rated study of the German language and literature, history and culture. This subject combination is ideal preparation for a career across the creative arts and media, and with the international dimension opening other options too.

Study Information

At a Glance

Learning Mode
On Campus Learning
Degree Qualification
MA
Duration
60 months
Study Mode
Full Time
Start Month
September
UCAS Code
QR32
Degree marketing image

Aberdeen is a leading centre for the study of literature, language and creative writing, rated second in the UK for its research output. You will study poetry and prose through the dynamic relationship between author, reader and literary text, covering every period from Chaucer to contemporary English, Scottish, Irish, European and American writing and the cultural and critical impact of powerful and controversial modern works. You will be inspired by enthusiastic teachers and researchers, themselves acclaimed authors and poets and will be encouraged to develop your own creative writing skills.

German at Aberdeen has an outstanding reputation with the highest possible rating of ‘Excellent’ in the last national Teaching Quality Assessment. You will gain a broad understanding of Germany’s complex history and culture in today’s German-speaking world and enjoy many opportunities to practice your developing language skills informally through the German Society and Drama Group.

As an integral part of your 5-year programme, you will spend the whole of year three taking your language and cultural skills to a very high level as a Teaching Assistant or visiting student in a German-speaking country.

You will graduate prepared for careers across the arts, publishing, or media, with the international dimension opening opportunities in business, international organisations, tourism and many other options.

What You'll Study

Year 1

Compulsory Courses

Academic Writing for Language & Literature (AW1008)

This compulsory evaluation is designed to find out if your academic writing is of a sufficient standard to enable you to succeed at university and, if you need it, to provide support to improve. It is completed on-line via MyAberdeen with clear instructions to guide you through it. If you pass the evaluation at the first assessment it will not take much of your time. If you do not, you will be provided with resources to help you improve. This evaluation does not carry credits but if you do not complete it this will be recorded on your degree transcript.

Getting Started at the University of Aberdeen (PD1002)

This course, which is prescribed for level 1 undergraduate students (and articulating students who are in their first year at the University), is studied entirely online, takes approximately 5-6 hours to complete and can be taken in one sitting, or spread across a number of weeks.

Topics include orientation overview, equality and diversity, health, safety and cyber security and how to make the most of your time at university in relation to careers and employability.

Successful completion of this course will be recorded on your Enhanced Transcript as ‘Achieved’.

Acts of Reading (EL1009)

15 Credit Points

This course introduces students to the study of English by exploring the dynamic relationship between author, reader and text in a series of classic works of fiction and poetry. It covers a broad historical range (from Folk Tales and ballads to 21st century postmodernity) and offers a basic grounding in key elements of literary theory, literary history and the varieties of literary form.

Optional Courses

Select ONE OR BOTH from the following:

  • Controversial Classics (EL1513) AND/OR Rethinking Reading (EL1536)

Also, select ONE of the following options:

Beginners (for absolute beginners and those who have studied German for up to 3 years):

  • German for Beginners 1 (GM1054)
  • German for Beginners 2 (GM1554)
  • Background to German Beginners 1(GM1049) AND/OR Background to German Beginners 2 (GM1549)

Advanced (for post-Higher candidates and those who have studied German for more than 4 years):

  • German Language 1 (GM1050)
  • German Language 2 (GM1550)
  • Modern German Culture 1 (GM1052) AND/OR Modern German Culture 2 (GM1556)

Both options will also select further credit points from courses of choice to gain a total of 120 credits.

German for Beginners 1 (GM1054)

15 Credit Points

This language course provides students with a sound foundation in German (grammar and vocabulary). It enables students to understand the gist of authentic written and spoken German and to speak and write about familiar topics with a degree of accuracy and fluency.

No previous knowledge of German is required, but this course is also for students which took German at school before, on any level lower than Higher or A-level.

With 3 Language Classes and 1 Language Practical per week this course encourages and supports students to develop their personal self-study strategies.

German for Beginners 2 (GM1554)

15 Credit Points

This language course provides students with a sound foundation in German (grammar and vocabulary). It enables students to understand the gist of authentic written and spoken German and to speak and write about familiar topics with a degree of accuracy and fluency.

No previous knowledge of German is required, but this course is also for students which took German at school before, on any level lower than Higher or A-level.

With 3 Language Classes and 1 Language Practical per week this course encourages and supports students to develop their personal self-study strategies.

Background to German for Beginners 2 (GM1549)

15 Credit Points

This course is intended for beginners, wishing to proceed with German Studies beyond level 1. It provides an introduction to selected German Short Stories from the 20th-century, with a particular focus on relating these to their cultural, historical and social context.

German Language 1 (GM1050)

15 Credit Points

This module is designed for students with an SCE H in German or equivalent. The course develops receptive and productive oral and written German language skills. Students who are considering applying for entry to German Honours must take this course.

German Language 2 (GM1550)

15 Credit Points

This module is designed for students with an SCE H in German or equivalent. The course develops receptive and productive oral and written German language skills. Students who are considering applying for entry to German Honours must take this course. The course builds on GM1050.

Modern German Culture 1 (GM1052)

15 Credit Points

Learn more about German 20th-century literature, dealing with the events that shaped German and European history. As in all good literature, we will discuss universal themes and topics covering all of the most important aspects of modern life.

Modern German Culture 2 (GM1556)

15 Credit Points

Learn more about modern German history, culture and literature while also extending your skills in reading German texts.

Background to German for Beginners 1 (GM1049)

15 Credit Points

Students will gain detailed knowledge and understanding of the fascinating political and cultural developments and historical events in 20th century Germany.

They will be introduced in weekly lectures and tutorials to a variety of texts and contemporary films.

This course is taught in English and normally taken in conjunction with GM1054 German for Beginners 1. It is specifically recommended to students with the intention to proceed with German Studies beyond level one.

No pre-requisites are required.

Controversial Classics (EL1513)

15 Credit Points

Literature can provoke, offend and disturb as well as entertain. This course considers some of the most powerful and controversial works of modern literature. It examines the circumstances of publication, the nature of the controversy, and the cultural and critical impact of each work. The course shows how poems, plays and novels can raise searching questions about national, racial and personal identity, and looks at the methods used by writers to challenge their readers, as well the responses of readers to such challenges.

Rethinking Reading (EL1536)

15 Credit Points

Rethinking Reading invites you to consider what we do when we study literature. What shapes the idea of literature as we know it? How, and why, might we want to change the ways in which we think about texts? Who gets to decide, and why does it matter? Designed as an introduction to critical theory for students of literature, Rethinking Reading introduces several key topics in critical studies: literature, authorship, genre, sexuality, and posthumanism.

Year 2

Compulsory Courses

Encounters with Shakespeare (EL2011)

30 Credit Points

So you think you know Shakespeare? This course invites you to think again. Studying a range of plays we get behind the mythology of Shakespeare, and rediscover the dynamic inventiveness of the Elizabethan theatre. Shakespeare and his contemporaries were the principal players in a period of literary experimentation that reinvented the possibilities of literature. Encounters with Shakespeare is your chance to find out more.

Modern German Culture 3 (GM2043)

15 Credit Points

Learn more about modern German history and culture while also extending your skills in reading German texts.

Modern German Culture 4 (GM2543)

15 Credit Points

This course consists of the study of selected aspects of German culture and involves the close analysis of German texts.

The Tragedy of Knowledge (EL2512)

30 Credit Points

This course traces the use of key Western myths from antiquity to the present to examine the way knowledge is often presented as both dangerous and compelling. As well as introducing students to a range of historical, social, and formal variations on the theme of knowledge, the course also highlights the role of storytelling and adaptation in the formation of knowledge and understanding.

Optional Courses

Select ONE of the following options:

    Beginner:

    • German Language (Advanced Introductory) 1 (GM2040)
    • German Language (Advanced Introductory) 2 (GM2540)

    Advanced:

    • German Language 3 (GM2042)
    • German Language 4 (GM2542)
    German Language (Advanced Introductory) 1 (GM2040)

    15 Credit Points

    The course consists of language classes leading to advanced communicative competence in German and it will include the analysis of contemporary texts drawn from a variety of contexts. This course may be taken only by students who have completed the German for Beginners courses.

    German Language (Advanced Introductory) 2 (GM2540)

    15 Credit Points

    The intention of the course is to extend and reinforce further students' command of German grammar, vocabulary and syntactic structures, and to introduce various styles of written and spoken German. The course builds on the work done in GM2040 and is intended only for continuing beginners.

    German Language 3 (GM2042)

    15 Credit Points

    This level two language course will build on and extend students' fluency and written skills in German.

    German Language 4 (GM2542)

    15 Credit Points

    Building on work done in GM 2042, the course will develop further language skills.

    Year 3

    Compulsory Courses

    Academic year spent in a German-speaking country.

    Year 4

    Compulsory Courses

    German Junior Honours Language Study (GM3069)

    15 Credit Points

    This junior honours language course will build on and extend students' written skills and fluency in German.

    Optional Courses

    Select ONE course from EACH of the following categories:

    Medieval/Renaissance Literature

    • EL35EH: Classical Epic
    • EL30CP: Page and Stage: Renaissance Writings 1500-1640
    • EL35DQ: Knights, Virgins and Viragos: Chaucer and Medieval Writing

    Romantic/Victorian Literature

    • EL30XR: Romanticism
    • EL30SB: Britain and the 19th Century World
    • EL35QA: Sympathy for the Devil: Scottish Short Stories

    Contemporary/Modern Literature

    • EL35KN: Haunted Texts
    • EL30FF: Modernism: Make it New
    • EL30RD: American Voices: Self and Society,1850-1930
    • EL30WC: Queer Times
    • EL35UT: Art and Atrocity: Representations of Violence and Trauma

    Plus ONE course from the following:

    • EL30YB: Creative Writing: Creativity and Craft
    • EL35VC: Fallen Women and Self-Made Men
    • EL30UT: Art and Atrocity: Representations of Violence and Trauma
    • LN3524: Stylistics
    • FS35ZB: Landscapes of Film and Literature

    Plus, select a further 45 credits of level 3 German courses.

    Page and Stage: Renaissance Writings 1500 - 1640 (EL30CP)

    30 Credit Points

    This course explores the poetry, drama and prose of a period often referred to as the golden age of English literature. A period which saw Shakespeare and his contemporaries produce innovative new literary works in which the language of desire took centre stage.

    Classical Epic (EL35EH)

    30 Credit Points

    This course is your opportunity to study four of the most influential and gripping texts of world literature. We begin in the oral culture of ancient Greece, with the Iliad's stark meditation on war and death, and the Odyssey's consolatory reflections on divine justice, poetry and love. In imperial Rome, we see the genre transformed into a monument to political power in Virgil's Aeneid, then thrown into disarray by Ovid's irreverent anti-epic, the Metamorphoses. We end by considering some of the ways these texts have been exploited and adapted across the intervening centuries, in poetry and prose, art and film.

    Knights, Virgins and Viragos: Chaucer and Medieval Writing (EL35DQ)

    30 Credit Points

    An introduction to late medieval-literature, challenging modern assumptions about the medieval and exploring the diverse range of medieval literary culture, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to the autobiographical narrative of Margery Kempe and surprising profanity of medieval lyric.

    Romanticism (EL30XR)

    30 Credit Points

    The Romantic movement swept Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and produced some of the most innovative and exciting literature that has ever been seen. This rule breaking art helped shape the way that we consider art today and underpins many of our ideas about imagination, originality, creativity and self-expression. This course will explore the ways in which the Romantic movement manifested itself across Britain and Ireland and will consider writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Austen and Byron.

    Britain and the Nineteenth - Century World (EL30SB)

    30 Credit Points

    The Romantic (1782-1832) and Victorian (1832-1901) periods were ones of remarkable activity for British citizens abroad. Imperial expansion, increasing international trade, major conflicts and growing mass migration all drew more British citizens than ever into contact with the wider world. This course explores the footprints left by these interactions in nineteenth-century literature: critically examining how Britain saw the world and how the English-speaking world saw Britain during a century of unprecedented international activity. This course will combine canonical writers of empire and migration with less well-known accounts of the period. Writers covered may include Mary Shelley, Henry Derozio, Fergus Hume, Cornelia Sorabji, Robert Louis Stevenson and Arthur Conan Doyle. The course will apply a range of critical lenses to this material offering students an introduction to key concepts and debates from nation theory, settler studies and postcolonial studies.

    Sympathy for the Devil: Scottish Short Stories (EL35QA)

    30 Credit Points

    While the short story is often said to have developed in America, nineteenth-century Scottish writing is in fact instrumental in the emergence of the form. Often drawing on oral and folk traditions Scottish writers in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries employ the supernatural, or our fear of it, to explore subjects such as guilt, fear, remorse and the extent to which we can control our own destinies. This course will explore the ways in which the short story in Scotland develops from the early nineteenth century until the beginning of the twentieth. It will include writers such as Walter Scott, James Hogg, John Galt, Margaret Oliphant, Robert Louis Stevenson, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jane Findlater and Lewis Grassic Gibbon

    Modernism: Make IT New (EL30FF)

    30 Credit Points

    The early twentieth century was a time of great literary experimentation as literary modernists rose to the challenge to make it new. We will explore modernism’s stylistic experimentation while also considering the social contexts and changes that shaped this literature. The course will examine a range of writers, genres, movements and locations which prompt us to consider what, when and where was modernism.

    American Voices: Self and Society, 1850 - 1930 (EL30RD)

    30 Credit Points

    This course examines an important and diverse period in the development of American literature, lasting from the mid-nineteenth century until the 1930s. During the course we will be analysing works by a variety of American writers from this period in their historical, social and political contexts as well as considering the ways in which they pioneered innovative literary forms and techniques.

    Queer Times (EL30WC)

    30 Credit Points

    This course adopts a cross-period approach, bringing contemporary and premodern texts into conversation in exploring representations of queer experiences and themes in diverse forms. Divided into three sections, queer presents, queer pasts, and queer futures, the course will introduce a selection of theoretical and critical readings in thinking about how representation is shaped by temporal and cultural context. We will consider the relationship between representation of queer experience and formal experimentation, and how queer forms impact on our sense of queer possibilities.

    Haunted Texts (EL35KN)

    30 Credit Points

    This course offers an overview of a wide range of twentieth-century Scottish literature, focusing on themes of haunting, death, and place. Including novels, short stories, poetry, and drama, the course explores questions of the relationship between self and society, the legacy of the past, and the formation of gendered and regional identities. There are lots of ghosts.

    Art and Atrocity: Representations of Violence and Trauma (EL35UT)

    30 Credit Points

    How is the artist to respond when the virtual becomes the real and when words cannot carry the weight of trauma? How can an author avoid the accusations of voyeuristic prurience or crass opportunism when he or she attempts to re-present events of public violence? This multi-disciplinary course examines work from a wide range of modes, including fiction, poetry, film and graphic art, and looks at the difficulties of inscribing trauma and the ethics and praxis of remembrance. Key events covered include the Holocaust, the Sabra and Shatila massacre, 9-11, the Gulf War and the conflict in the Balkans.

    Art and Atrocity: Representations of Violence and Trauma (EL30UT)

    30 Credit Points

    How is the artist to respond when the virtual becomes the real and when words cannot carry the weight of trauma? How can an author avoid the accusations of voyeuristic prurience or crass opportunism when he or she attempts to re-present events of public violence? This multi-disciplinary course examines work from a wide range of modes, including fiction, poetry, film and graphic art, and looks at the difficulties of inscribing trauma and the ethics and praxis of remembrance. Key events covered include the Holocaust, the Sabra and Shatila massacre, 9-11, the Gulf War and the conflict in the Balkans.

    Creative Writing: Creativity and Craft (EL30YB)

    30 Credit Points

    This course offers students the opportunity, through lectures and interactive workshops, to develop their understanding of, and practical skills in, the writing of prose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction. Taught by widely published, award-winning writers, it provides a thorough, practice-based understanding of creative process and of the technical challenges involved in developing an original idea into a completed literary artefact, presented to a professional standard. It also contributes to students' future career potential, whether as ‘creative’ or other kinds of professional writers/communicators.

    Stylistics (LN3524)

    30 Credit Points

    This course enables students to apply skills of close linguistic analysis to a range of literary texts and genres. Students will explore the ways that different aspects of linguistic structure shape and contribute to readers' interpretations. The core structural elements of phonology, morphology and syntax will be covered; each week, students will discuss a particular text, putting into practice skills of stylistic analysis. We will cover both canonical ‘Literary’ texts and other forms of writing.

    Landscapes of Film and Literature (FS35ZB)

    30 Credit Points

    This course will invite students to explore the ways film and literature can engage with and represent a variety of landscapes, and how, in turn, landscape can influence both the production of the work and the creation of meaning. We will study selected works of film and literature from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including mainstream and independent cinema, poetry, and fiction and non-fiction literary texts that have been adapted for film. We will look at ways in which various landscapes may have been appropriated for their emotive qualities: to connote feelings of desolation, oppression or plenitude; loneliness, fear or joy. We will also look at landscapes as sites of specific cultural history. As the course progresses, drawing on contemporary research in cultural and human geographies, and elsewhere, we will explore the ways that studying landscapes of film and literature can assist in our ability to conceive landscape not only as a static or symbolic entity, but as a highly mobile, interactive site in which history, experience and materiality converge in the ongoing production of space and meaning. In this way, we will consider how the works studied articulate John Wylie’s provocative claim that ‘landscape is tension’.

    This interdisciplinary course will draw on writings from literary, film and cultural theorists, philosophers, artists and social scientists.

    Year 5

    Compulsory Courses

    German Language Study for Senior Honours (GM4099)

    30 Credit Points

    Building on the skills gained during the Junior Honours language course and before, this module expands and refines German language expertise in writing, reading, speaking and listening, to an advanced level, for their final exit written and oral exam in German.

    Optional Courses

    Select ONE of the following dissertation options:

    • English Dissertation (EL4502)
    • Dissertation in German (GM4052)

    Plus further courses in Level 4 English and German to gain 60 credits in each discipline.

    English Dissertation (EL4502)

    30 Credit Points

    Students will have the opportunity to write a dissertation on a topic of their choosing within English literature.

    Dissertation in German (GM4052)

    15 Credit Points

    Students engage in their first larger project of independent research. The dissertation is to be written in German and followed by a 20 minute Viva.

    We will endeavour to make all course options available; however, these may be subject to timetabling and other constraints. Please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

    How You'll Study

    Learning Methods

    • Individual Projects
    • Lectures
    • Research
    • Tutorials

    Assessment Methods

    Students are assessed by any combination of three assessment methods:

    • Coursework such as essays and reports completed throughout the course.
    • Practical assessments of the skills and competencies they learn on the course.
    • Written examinations at the end of each course.

    The exact mix of these methods differs between subject areas, years of study and individual courses.

    Honours projects are typically assessed on the basis of a written dissertation.

    Why Study English and German?

    Why English

    • 94% Overall Satisfaction for Linguistics and Creative Writing. The Complete University Guide 2021
    • An international profile through major literary projects such as the Cambridge Edition of the Works of Jane Austen and the Edinburgh Edition of the Waverley Novels of Sir Walter Scott.
    • The WORD Centre for Creative Writing, promoting creative projects in fiction, non-fiction and collaborative mixed-media in all the languages of northeast Scotland (from Doric to Polish).
    • The spectacular, award-winning Sir Duncan Rice Library, home to literary treasures collected over 500 years, charting the power of the written word from ancient papyri and medieval manuscripts to contemporary e-books and other media.
    • Historic collections including rare printed books, the 12th century Aberdeen Bestiary, MacBean Stuart and Jacobite Collection, the novels of Sir Walter Scott, and an exceptional collection of Charles Dickens' first editions.
    • A packed campus programme of student and public events, exhibitions, seminars, invited speakers and the annual May Festival which welcomes internationally acclaimed authors to campus every spring to discuss literature, including European writers.
    • Research centres include the nationally recognised Centre for the Novel, the Centre for Modern Thought, and the Research Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies.

    Why German

    • The highest possible rating of ‘Excellent’ in the last Scottish national Teaching Quality Assessment.
    • A vibrant international community on campus and across the region, with many German-speaking students, staff and activities to get involved in and practise your language skills.
    • German Society open to all students interested in German and the German-speaking countries, organising drama performances and other events such as Kaffee and Kuchen, a German Stammtisch, film showings, and visits by German speakers and writers.
    • German Drama Group providing a great opportunity to produce an annual play, widen your language skills and meet other German students studying in Aberdeen. Previous years included works of 20th century dramatists Dürrenmatt, Borchert and Horvath.
    • Opportunities to study the rich literature and culture of Austria and Switzerland in addition to Germany.
    • A packed campus programme of events, exhibitions, seminars, invited speakers and the popular annual May Festival which welcomes international figures, experts, authors and scientists to campus every spring, with an increasingly European flavour.
    • Your period abroad as a language assistant or visiting student - we have exchange scholarships with the Universities of Zurich, Kiel and Greifswald, and Erasmus partners including Leipzig, Cologne, Bonn, Trier and Graz in Austria.
    • The spectacular, award-winning Sir Duncan Rice Library, with fabulous study facilities, state-of-the-art technology, and an extensive German collection to inspire your studies.

    Entry Requirements

    Qualifications

    The information below is provided as a guide only and does not guarantee entry to the University of Aberdeen.


    General Entry Requirements

    2022 Entry

    SQA Highers

    Standard: AABB

    Applicants who have achieved AABB (or better), are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/ Advanced Highers may be required.

    Minimum: BBB

    Applicants who have achieved BBB (or are on course to achieve this by the end of S5) are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will normally be required.

    Adjusted: BB

    Applicants who have achieved BB, and who meet one of the widening participation criteria are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will be required.

    More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

    A LEVELS

    Standard: BBB

    Minimum: BBC

    Adjusted: CCC

    More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

    International Baccalaureate

    32 points, including 5, 5, 5 at HL.

    Irish Leaving Certificate

    5H with 3 at H2 AND 2 at H3.

    Entry from College

    Advanced entry to this degree may be possible from some HNC/HND qualifications, please see www.abdn.ac.uk/study/articulation for more details.

    2023 Entry

    SQA Highers

    Standard: AABB

    Applicants who have achieved AABB (or better), are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/ Advanced Highers may be required.

    Minimum: BBB

    Applicants who have achieved BBB (or are on course to achieve this by the end of S5) are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will normally be required.

    Adjusted: BB

    Applicants who have achieved BB, and who meet one of the widening participation criteria are encouraged to apply and will be considered. Good performance in additional Highers/Advanced Highers will be required.

    More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

    A LEVELS

    Standard: BBB

    Minimum: BBC

    Adjusted: CCC

    More information on our definition of Standard, Minimum and Adjusted entry qualifications.

    International Baccalaureate

    32 points, including 5, 5, 5 at HL.

    Irish Leaving Certificate

    5H with 3 at H2 AND 2 at H3.

    Entry from College

    Advanced entry to this degree may be possible from some HNC/HND qualifications, please see www.abdn.ac.uk/study/articulation for more details.

    The information displayed in this section shows a shortened summary of our entry requirements. For more information, or for full entry requirements for Arts and Social Sciences degrees, see our detailed entry requirements section.


    English Language Requirements

    To study for an Undergraduate degree at the University of Aberdeen it is essential that you can speak, understand, read, and write English fluently. The minimum requirements for this degree are as follows:

    IELTS Academic:

    OVERALL - 6.0 with: Listening - 5.5; Reading - 5.5; Speaking - 5.5; Writing - 6.0

    TOEFL iBT:

    OVERALL - 78 with: Listening - 17; Reading - 18; Speaking - 20; Writing - 21

    PTE Academic:

    OVERALL - 59 with: Listening - 59; Reading - 59; Speaking - 59; Writing - 59

    Cambridge English B2 First, C1 Advanced or C2 Proficiency:

    OVERALL - 169 with: Listening - 162; Reading - 162; Speaking - 162; Writing - 169

    Read more about specific English Language requirements here.

    Fees and Funding

    You will be classified as one of the fee categories below.

    Fee information
    Fee category Cost
    RUK £9,250
    Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year
    EU / International students £19,800
    Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year
    Home Students £1,820
    Tuition Fees for 2022/23 Academic Year

    Scholarships and Funding

    Students from England, Wales and Northern Ireland, who pay tuition fees may be eligible for specific scholarships allowing them to receive additional funding. These are designed to provide assistance to help students support themselves during their time at Aberdeen.

    Financial support for your study year abroad

    We provide funding to students starting in 2021/22 on degrees with a compulsory period abroad at the same level as the Turing funding. This financial support can be used towards rent in your new city overseas, general living costs, or travelling to see more of your new home country. Students going abroad will continue to pay their normal rate of tuition fees with no increased charges or need to change tuition fee arrangements to the host university. For a full overview of how the tuition fees work, you can check this helpful funding table on our website.

    Additional Fees

    • In exceptional circumstances there may be additional fees associated with specialist courses, for example field trips. Any additional fees for a course can be found in our Catalogue of Courses.
    • For more information about tuition fees for this programme, including payment plans and our refund policy, please visit our InfoHub Tuition Fees page.

    Our Funding Database

    View all funding options in our Funding Database.

    Careers

    There are many opportunities at the University of Aberdeen to develop your knowledge, gain experience and build a competitive set of skills to enhance your employability. This is essential for your future career success. The Careers and Employability Service can help you to plan your career and support your choices throughout your time with us, from first to final year – and beyond.

    Our Experts

    Information About Staff Changes

    You will be taught by a range of experts including professors, lecturers, teaching fellows and postgraduate tutors. Staff changes will occur from time to time; please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

    Discover Uni

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    Get in Touch

    Contact Details

    Address
    Student Recruitment & Admissions
    University of Aberdeen
    University Office
    Regent Walk
    Aberdeen
    AB24 3FX