Highly cited recent papers

Ordered by average citations per years:

  1. EULAR revised recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia (2017), Macfarlane et al.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 76 (2), pp. 318-328.
    Cited 277 times (92 average citations per year)

  2. Prevalence of chronic pain in the UK: A systematic review and meta-analysis of population studies (2016), Fayaz et al.
    BMJ Open, 6 (6), art. no. e010364
    Cited 263 times (66 average citations per year)

  3. Global prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (2014), Dean et al.
    Rheumatology, 53 (4), art. no. ket387, pp. 650-657.
    Cited 249 times (42 average citations per year)

  4. The prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population: A comparison of the American College of Rheumatology 1990, 2010, and modified 2010 classification criteria (2015), Jones et al.
    Arthritis and Rheumatology, 67 (2), pp. 568-575.
    Cited 184 times (37 average citations per year)

  5. Defining chronic pain in epidemiological studies: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Steingrímsdóttir et al.
    Pain. 2017; 158(11): 2092-2107.
    Cited 63 times  (21 average citations per year)

  6. Risk of recurrent stillbirth: systematic review and meta-analysis, Lamont K et al.
    BMJ. 2015; 350: h3080.
    Cited 72 times (14 average citations per year)

  7. Adverse events in childhood and chronic widespread pain in adult life: Results from the 1958 British Birth Cohort Study (2009), Jones et al.
    Pain. 2009 May; 143(1-2): 92-6.
    Cited 149 times (14 average citations per year)

  8. The epidemiology of multiple somatic symptoms, Creed FH et al.
    J Psychosom Res. 2012; 72(4): 311-7
    Cited 104 times (13 average citations per year)

  9. Evaluation of work-related psychosocial factors and regional musculoskeletal pain: results from a EULAR Task Force (2009), Macfarlane et al.
    Annals of the Rheumatic, Diseases, 2009 Jun; 68(6): 885-91.
    Cited 121 times (11 average citations per year)

  10. The prevalence and management of low back pain across adulthood: Results from a population-based cross-sectional study (the MUSICIAN study) (2012), Macfarlane et al.
    Pain, 153 (1), pp. 27-32.
    Cited 89 times (11average citations per year)