Consortium Against Pain InEquality (CAPE) - The impact of adverse childhood experiences on chronic pain and responses to treatment.

Consortium Against Pain InEquality (CAPE) - The impact of adverse childhood experiences on chronic pain and responses to treatment.

Duration: 01 July 2021 – 30 June 2025
Funder: Medical Research Council and Versus Arthritis as part of the APDP initiative. 
Principle investigator (UoA): Professor Gary Macfarlane
Co-investigators (UoA): Dr Kate Timmins

Having a traumatic experience as a child – for example, abuse, neglect, violence, physical or emotional trauma, or living with hardship (such as severe financial difficulties) – can have a lifelong impact. Research has found that people who report having several adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, are more likely to have health problems later in life. Our aim is to improve our understanding of how ACEs might lead to chronic pain in adulthood. We will approach this from a variety of angles, piecing together different types of evidence.

We will develop a new questionnaire to better capture these adverse experiences, bring together data from current studies to rigorously evaluate the evidence of a link, collect new data on young people with arthritis, and investigate biomarkers that may be associated with people being at high risk of developing chronic pain.

Investigators at the University of Aberdeen will lead the work which will use epidemiological methods to analyse the relationship between ACEs and chronic pain in existing large-scale data sets.

CAPE is part of the Advanced Pain Discovery Platform (APDP).

If you have any queries about the study, you can contact the study team via email at epidemiology@abdn.ac.uk