Professor Mandy Ryan

Professor Mandy Ryan
Professor Mandy Ryan

Professor Mandy Ryan

Director of H E R U

Accepting PhDs

About

Health Economics Research Unit

Foresterhill, Polwarth Building

Aberdeen AB25 2ZD

 

Biography

Mandy is the Director of the Health Economics Research Unit. She joined HERU in 1987 after graduating from the University of Leicester with a BA (Hons) in Economics and the University of York with an MSc in Health Economics. In 1995, she graduated from the University of Aberdeen with a PhD in Economics concerned with the application of contingent valuation and discrete choice experiments (DCEs) in health economics. In 1997, Mandy was awarded a five-year Medical Research Council Non-Clinical Senior Fellowship to develop and apply DCEs in healthcare. In 2002, she was awarded a Personal Chair in Health Economics by the University of Aberdeen and in 2006 she was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. She took up the Directorship of HERU in April 2013.

Mandy's research interests focus on taking a person-centred approach to valuation in health economics. She is known for her work challenging the clinical approach to valuation that is often adopted by health economists and for developing alternative person-centred approaches. She introduced DCEs into health economics in the early 1990s and her research has applied DCEs in a wide range of contexts to take account of the user preferences in the delivery of healthcare.

 

Qualifications

  • BA Economics 
    1986 - University of Leicester 
  • MSc Health Economics 
    1987 - University of York 
  • PhD Economics 
    1995 - University of Aberdeen 
Research

Research Overview

Mandy's research interests focus on taking a person-centred approach to valuation in health economics. She is known for her work challenging the clinical approach to valuation that is often adopted by health economists and for developing alternative person-centred approaches. She introduced discrete choice experiments (DCEs) into health economics in the early 1990s and her research has applied DCEs in a wide range of contexts. 

Research Areas

Accepting PhDs

I am currently accepting PhDs in Applied Health Sciences, Economics.


Please get in touch if you would like to discuss your research ideas further.

Email Me

Applied Health Sciences

Accepting PhDs

Economics

Accepting PhDs

Research Specialisms

  • Applied Economics
  • Health Policy
  • Health and Welfare

Our research specialisms are based on the Higher Education Classification of Subjects (HECoS) which is HESA open data, published under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International licence.

Current Research

Mandy is currently applying DCEs to address a range of policy questions, including: informing shared decision making (developing a Decision Aid Tool); investigating if Scotland should provide Whole Genomic Sequencing for the diagnosis of rare diseases; professional preferences for referral to Intensive Care Units; women's preferences for treatment of metastatic breast cancer; preferences for allocation of time following a breast cancer diagnosis; and preferences for government responses to a pandemic. 

Mandy also conducts methodological work to inform future practice for the design and analysis of DCEs. Current research interests include: using eye-tracking methods to understand how individuals respond to DCEs; experiments to explore the external validity of DCEs (do individuals behave in reality as they state in hypothetical surveys); and understanding how best to include the cost attribute in DCEs. 

Supervision

Abbott M. An economic evaluation of genomic sequencing for the diagnosis of rare conditions in Scotland. University of Aberdeen, 2020-

Turner A. Discrete choice experiments in medical education: the role of management, health economics and research, University of Pretoria, 2019-

Gao N. The gift of time: how do I use it and how should I use it? Time allocation following a breast cancer diagnosis, University of Aberdeen, 2017-

Sakowsky R. Our values or mine? A philosophical and empirical critique of deliberative and stated preference elicitation techniques in health economics. Awarded January 2020, University of Aberdeen.

Chua G. Testing the external validity of discrete choice experiments – an application to pharmacy. Awarded 2018, University of Aberdeen.

Heidenreich S. Do I care or do I not? - An empirical assessment of decision heuristics in discrete choice. Awarded 2016, University of Aberdeen.

Hernandez R. Broadening the valuation space in health technology assessment: the case of monitoring individuals with ocular hypertension. Awarded 2016, University of Aberdeen.

Guda A. Health insurance demand analysis amongst formal sector employees in Ethiopia: a discrete choice experiment, Awarded 2014, University of Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) and Trinity College Dublin.

Kenter J. Implementing the ecosystems approach through linking deliberative monetary valuation and participatory systems modelling. Awarded 2014, University of Aberdeen.

Scotland G. Valuing outcomes in economic evaluations of maternal and reproductive health care interventions. Awarded 2012, University of Aberdeen

Mentzakis E. Economic issues of informal care: valuation and determinants. Awarded 2008, University of Aberdeen.

Regier D. Bayesian approaches to discrete choice experiments within a cost benefit framework: an application to genetic testing. Awarded 2008, University of Aberdeen.

Tinelli M. Developing and applying discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to inform pharmacy policy. Awarded 2008, University of Aberdeen.

Porteous T. How do people choose between self-care, supported self-care and GP consultations in minor illness? Awarded 2007, University of Aberdeen.

Amaya-Amaya M. Complexity and non-compensatory behaviour: an empirical investigation in health economics using choice experiments. Awarded 2005, University of Aberdeen.

Gerard K. Economic aspects of consumer involvement in health care benefit assessment. Awarded 2005, University of Southampton.

Jareinpituk S. Developing willingness to pay and a prepayment oral care plan: an application to pre-school children in Thailand. Awarded 2003, University College London.

McIntosh E. Using discrete choice experiments within economic evaluations. Awarded 2003, University of Aberdeen.

Hundley V. Determining success in the provision of maternity care. Awarded 2001, University of Aberdeen

San Miguel F. Testing the assumptions of completeness, stability and rationality of preferences in health economics using discrete choice experiments. Awarded 2001, University of Aberdeen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching

Teaching Responsibilities

Mandy contributes to the delivery of our annual DCE course: Using Discrete Choice Experiments in Health Economics

Publications

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Chapters in Books, Reports and Conference Proceedings

Contributions to Journals

Working Papers and Discussion Papers

Other Contributions