Introduction

With its unique history and resources reaching back to the times of the university's founder Bishop William Elphinstone (1431-1514), the university offers the MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern Studies as an interdisciplinary degree to students interested in Medieval, Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.

This programme is studied on campus.

The taught MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (12 months full time, 22 months part time) offers an interdisciplinary approach to the medieval and early modern Europe and helps you to understand this fascinating period in the context of the fundamental changes that connect the modern world with its past. The degree is an ideal preparation for doctoral studies but also provides applied skills for careers in museums, archives and education. We offer a range of generic skills courses as well as options reflecting the research interests of our internationally renowned teaching and research staff. You will experience a high degree of individual guidance and you can tailor the degree to your own interests. Courses are drawn from various disciplines including History, Church History and Divinity, Celtic, English, French, History of Art, Legal History, Philosophy and Scottish and Irish Studies. The MLitt provides ample opportunity to use important record collections held in Aberdeen, including the UNESCO UK recognised Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives. Students benefit from a research culture formed across arts and humanities disciplines through various research centres such as the Centre for:

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Key Programme Information

At a Glance

Learning Mode
On Campus Learning
Degree Qualification
MLitt
Duration
12 months or 24 months
Study Mode
Full Time or Part Time
Start Month
September

What You'll Study

If students do not wish to undertake the full Master’s Degree, other exit points include the Postgraduate Certificate (based on undertaking 60 credit points, 40 of which much be at level 5), or the Postgraduate Diploma (based on 120 credit points, 90 of which must be at level 5).

Semester 1

Semester 1

Students must acquire 180 credits over the course of the year (105 for courses + 75 for the dissertation). Courses should normally total 45-60 credit points in each half-session.

Optional Courses

Note: Students intending to do a dissertation on a topic not requiring Latin may be exempted from LT1009 at the discretion of the programme coordinator.

Note: Potential areas of study under HI502K include:
The Enlightenment in Comparison: Scotland, Ireland and Central Europe
The Scottish Wars of Independence, 1286-1328
The Three Kingdoms of the Seventeenth Century
Crime and Society in Early Modern England and Scotland
Back in the Viking Homelands
Jacobites: War, Exile, and Politics of Succession in Britain
Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Manuscript Studies
Introduction to Old English Language
Controversy and Drama: Marlowe to Revenge Tragedy
Art and Society in Eighteenth-Century England
Seventeenth-Century Netherlandish Art
Medieval Manuscripts: Illustration of Medieval Thought
Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason
Scottish Legal History, 14th-18th century

Special Subject (HI502K) - 30 Credit Points

This course allows you to do in-depth study in a specific area in History or a related subject agreed upon with your programme coordinator. It may be offered in conjunction with you sitting in on level 3 or 4 lectures relating to the subject material, with additional individual tuition. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Engaging with Historiography (HI502T) - 30 Credit Points

Students work closely with a member of staff to develop a detailed knowledge of and write a critical survey of the literature in their chosen field. This helps students develop research skills required for the literature review in the dissertation, but will be much broader in scope to ensure they have a secure grasp of the relevant research in their field. The course enhances students' ability to identify and engage critically with a body of literature and improve their skills in academic writing appropriate to postgraduate work. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Old Norse 2: Language, Runes and Place Names (HI552J) - 30 Credit Points

This course develops your Old Norse skills by reading more complex texts such as skaldic and eddic poetry, runes and unnormalised Old Norse texts. Poetry and runes give a fascinating insight into the Old Norse world before the introduction to Christianity and during the Conversion period which is not represented by unbiased prose works. In addition, students will gain a basic insight into runology and toponymy, and will be presented with the latest positions in research in these fields. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Advanced Topics in Old Norse Language, Literature and Culture (HI502P)
Palaeography i (HI501D) - 15 Credit Points

A postgraduate student of medieval and early modern history or literature often needs to be able to use unedited literary and archival sources, or to check the completeness and accuracy of existing editions. Medievalists often need to consult material available only in later copies, extracts and antiquarian notes. To do so, you must be able to read pre-modern scripts. This course is designed to give students the necessary skills to use manuscript sources for themselves, whatever their date, describe manuscripts, and transcribe texts. Assessment is by exercises and a final essay. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Latin 1 (LT1009) - 15 Credit Points

LT1009 is an introductory, intensive course for those with little or no previous exposure to Latin. Students completing this course should have a Latin vocabulary of about 400 words and a basic understanding of Latin grammar and syntax. Students successfully completing this course will be adequately prepared to attend LT1507. Students will very likely discover that their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar/syntax is improved by their study of Latin. The etymological roots of many English words can be traced to the Latin language. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Approaching Archives (HI552L) - 15 Credit Points

What is an archive and how can it be used? Students are introduced to some archives in Aberdeen and learn how to make best use of these important resources for research. Seminars investigate the history and philosophy of archival collections, and how they relate to museums, libraries and galleries; approaches to the evaluation of contents of archives and qualitative analyses of specific collections. Assessment is based on a 5000-word essay in which students are asked to identify and analyse material from a specific archive which may be in Aberdeen, or elsewhere in Scotland, the UK, or abroad. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Research Preparation in Historical Studies (HI5594) - 15 Credit Points

This course consists of a mixture of two-hour group seminars and shorter one-to-one supervision with the member of staff best equipped to advise you on your dissertation topic. It will involve detailed discussion of your research ideas and planning with the aim of providing the fullest preparation for researching and writing the dissertation in the summer and research beyond. Fundamental to the success of the course are mutual feedback and support within the student group. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Independent Reading In Historical Studies (HI552G) - 15 Credit Points

This course allows a student to do in-depth study in a specific area in History agreed with the course coordinator. You will be allocated a supervisor and through a series of meetings pursue in-depth reading on a topic and write a 4000-word essay on that subject. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Presenting Historical Research (HI552R) - 30 Credit Points

Students complete the course with an enhanced ability to present convincing academic arguments and research findings in writing and, particularly orally. They improve their critical engagement with the research and arguments of other historians.

Students attend research seminars and write a seminar comparison report, fostering engagement with the process of presenting arguments and research findings.

Following training in presentation skills, students present their dissertation proposals in a workshop, recording their presentation using Camtasia, and respond to questions from staff and students. Students then write a reflective analysis of their presentations.

Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Old Norse Language i (HI502Y)
Business for Arts (BU5068)
Semester 2

Semester 2

Students must acquire 180 credits over the course of the year (105 for courses + 75 for the dissertation). Courses should normally total 45-60 credit points in each half-session.


Work on the dissertation begins in the second half-session and is completed during the summer months.

Compulsory Courses

Dissertation in Historical Studies (HI5915) - 75 Credit Points

An individually supervised project with a 18,000-word dissertation for students to complete their MLitt qualification

Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Research Paper (HI5913) - 15 Credit Points

This is an individually-supervised project for students intending to complete a PG Dip in a programme in History

View detailed information about this course

Optional Courses

Note: Students intending to do a dissertation on a topic not requiring Latin may be exempted from LT1507 at the discretion of the programme coordinator.

Independent Reading In Historical Studies (HI552G) - 15 Credit Points

This course allows a student to do in-depth study in a specific area in History agreed with the course coordinator. You will be allocated a supervisor and through a series of meetings pursue in-depth reading on a topic and write a 4000-word essay on that subject. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Presenting Historical Research (HI552R) - 30 Credit Points

Students complete the course with an enhanced ability to present convincing academic arguments and research findings in writing and, particularly orally. They improve their critical engagement with the research and arguments of other historians.

Students attend research seminars and write a seminar comparison report, fostering engagement with the process of presenting arguments and research findings.

Following training in presentation skills, students present their dissertation proposals in a workshop, recording their presentation using Camtasia, and respond to questions from staff and students. Students then write a reflective analysis of their presentations.

Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Approaching Archives (HI552L) - 15 Credit Points

What is an archive and how can it be used? Students are introduced to some archives in Aberdeen and learn how to make best use of these important resources for research. Seminars investigate the history and philosophy of archival collections, and how they relate to museums, libraries and galleries; approaches to the evaluation of contents of archives and qualitative analyses of specific collections. Assessment is based on a 5000-word essay in which students are asked to identify and analyse material from a specific archive which may be in Aberdeen, or elsewhere in Scotland, the UK, or abroad. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Research Preparation in Historical Studies (HI5594) - 15 Credit Points

This course consists of a mixture of two-hour group seminars and shorter one-to-one supervision with the member of staff best equipped to advise you on your dissertation topic. It will involve detailed discussion of your research ideas and planning with the aim of providing the fullest preparation for researching and writing the dissertation in the summer and research beyond. Fundamental to the success of the course are mutual feedback and support within the student group. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Latin 2 (LT1507) - 15 Credit Points

LT1507 picks up where LT1009 (Latin 1) finished in first term. By the end of this course students should have a more or less comprehensive understanding of Latin syntax and grammar, a Latin vocabulary of 700-800 words, and should be capable of translating simple Latin texts into idiomatic English. Students will very likely discover that their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar/syntax is improved by their study of Latin.

View detailed information about this course

Latin 1 (LT1009) - 15 Credit Points

LT1009 is an introductory, intensive course for those with little or no previous exposure to Latin. Students completing this course should have a Latin vocabulary of about 400 words and a basic understanding of Latin grammar and syntax. Students successfully completing this course will be adequately prepared to attend LT1507. Students will very likely discover that their knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar/syntax is improved by their study of Latin. The etymological roots of many English words can be traced to the Latin language. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Palaeography i (HI501D) - 15 Credit Points

A postgraduate student of medieval and early modern history or literature often needs to be able to use unedited literary and archival sources, or to check the completeness and accuracy of existing editions. Medievalists often need to consult material available only in later copies, extracts and antiquarian notes. To do so, you must be able to read pre-modern scripts. This course is designed to give students the necessary skills to use manuscript sources for themselves, whatever their date, describe manuscripts, and transcribe texts. Assessment is by exercises and a final essay. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Special Subject (HI502K) - 30 Credit Points

This course allows you to do in-depth study in a specific area in History or a related subject agreed upon with your programme coordinator. It may be offered in conjunction with you sitting in on level 3 or 4 lectures relating to the subject material, with additional individual tuition. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Engaging with Historiography (HI502T) - 30 Credit Points

Students work closely with a member of staff to develop a detailed knowledge of and write a critical survey of the literature in their chosen field. This helps students develop research skills required for the literature review in the dissertation, but will be much broader in scope to ensure they have a secure grasp of the relevant research in their field. The course enhances students' ability to identify and engage critically with a body of literature and improve their skills in academic writing appropriate to postgraduate work. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Old Norse Language i (HI502Y)
Old Norse 2: Language, Runes and Place Names (HI552J) - 30 Credit Points

This course develops your Old Norse skills by reading more complex texts such as skaldic and eddic poetry, runes and unnormalised Old Norse texts. Poetry and runes give a fascinating insight into the Old Norse world before the introduction to Christianity and during the Conversion period which is not represented by unbiased prose works. In addition, students will gain a basic insight into runology and toponymy, and will be presented with the latest positions in research in these fields. Download Course Guide

View detailed information about this course

Business for Arts (BU5068)

Course Availability

We will endeavour to make all course options available; however, these may be subject to timetabling and other constraints. Please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

How You'll Study

Learning Methods

  • E-learning
  • Field Work
  • Individual Projects
  • Lectures
  • Research
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment Methods

Students must acquire 180 credits over the course of the year (105 for courses + 75 for the dissertation). Courses should normally total 45-60 credit points in each half-session. Assessment is based on written work and moderated according to university standards. Every student is assigned a dissertation supervisor based on their research interests.

Why Study Medieval and Early Modern Studies?

  • It provides you with foundational skills in the study of medieval and early modern Europe (languages and documents).
  • It helps you develop a deep understanding of the culture, history and other relevant disciplines for the period (through content courses) and skills in pursuing independent research in the field.
  • You will join a lively research environment with opportunities to participate in training courses and graduate student seminars.
  • If your interests fall in the Renaissance and Early Modern periods you can attend the activities for the Centre for Early Modern Studies.

What Our Students Say

Jared Thomley, Minnesota United States of America

Jared Thomley, Minnesota <small><i>United States of America</i></small>

Jared Thomley, Minnesota United States of America

The greatest feature of the this MLitt programme is the faculty. Not only does the department boast a compliment of world-renown scholars, it is also full of the nicest, most supportive people you meet. They are why I am here.

Entry Requirements

For more information about the application process, including details about which supporting documents you will be asked to provide, please click here.

Qualifications

The information below is provided as a guide only and does not guarantee entry to the University of Aberdeen.

You must normally have an Honours degree to at least 2.1 standard in an appropriate discipline or equivalent qualifications and experience.

Please enter your country to view country-specific entry requirements.

English Language Requirements

To study for a Postgraduate Taught degree at the University of Aberdeen it is essential that you can speak, understand, read, and write English fluently. The minimum requirements for this degree are as follows:

IELTS Academic:

OVERALL - 6.5 with: Listening - 5.5; Reading - 6.0; Speaking - 5.5; Writing - 6.0

TOEFL iBT:

OVERALL - 90 with: Listening - 17; Reading - 21; Speaking - 20; Writing - 21

PTE Academic:

OVERALL - 62 with: Listening - 51; Reading - 54; Speaking - 51; Writing - 54

Cambridge English Advanced & Proficiency:

OVERALL - 176 with: Listening - 162; Reading - 169; Speaking - 162; Writing - 169

Read more about specific English Language requirements here.

Document Requirements

You will be required to supply the following documentation with your application as proof you meet the entry requirements of this degree programme. If you have not yet completed your current programme of study, then you can still apply and you can provide your Degree Certificate at a later date.

Degree Certificate
a degree certificate showing your qualifications
Degree Transcript
a full transcript showing all the subjects you studied and the marks you have achieved in your degree(s) (original & official English translation)
Personal Statement
a detailed personal statement explaining your motivation for this particular programme

Fees and Funding

You will be classified as one of the fee categories below.

Fee information
Fee category Cost
Home / EU / RUK Students £6,700
Tuition Fees for 2019/20 Academic Year
International Students £15,900
Tuition Fees for 2019/20 Academic Year

Additional Fees

  • In exceptional circumstances there may be additional fees associated with specialist courses, for example field trips. Any additional fees for a course can be found in our Catalogue of Courses.
  • For more information about tuition fees for this programme, including payment plans and our refund policy, please visit our InfoHub Tuition Fees page.

Funding Opportunities

Grants and scholarship

The James Carnegie maintenance scholarship for postgraduate students is available with this degree.

Our Funding Database

View all funding options in our Funding Database.

Careers

There are many opportunities at the University of Aberdeen to develop your knowledge, gain experience and build a competitive set of skills to enhance your employability. This is essential for your future career success. The Careers Service can help you to plan your career and support your choices throughout your time with us, from first to final year – and beyond.

The Aberdeen Bestiary

The University is home to the Aberdeen Bestiary, one of the best examples of medieval illuminated manuscripts. Its text and appearance are closely related to the Ashmole Bestiary in Oxford. 

The Library of Duncan Liddell (1561-1613)

Liddell was a mathematician, physician and scholar of natural philosophy who bequeathed his library (a treasure for historians of early modern science and medicine) to the University of Aberdeen.

What our Alumni Say

Corryn Kosik

Corryn Kosik

Corryn Kosik

Job Details
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Graduated 2016

I really enjoyed all of my courses, and it was great to study on the campus of such an old university.

Our Experts

Other Experts
Professor Robert Frost
Professor Michael Brown
Professor David N. Dumville
Dr Jackson Armstrong
Dr Alastair Macdonald
Dr Helen Pierce
Dr Frederik Pedersen
Dr Andrew Gordon
Dr Thomas Rist
Dr Adelyn Wilson
Dr Andrew Simpson
Programme Coordinator
Professor Karin Friedrich

Information About Staff Changes

You will be taught by a range of experts including professors, lecturers, teaching fellows and postgraduate tutors. Staff changes will occur from time to time; please see our InfoHub pages for further information.

Get in Touch

Contact Details

Address
School of Divinity, History and Philosophy
University of Aberdeen
50-52 College Bounds
Aberdeen
AB24 3DS