Professor Marjon Van der Pol

Professor Marjon Van der Pol

Chair in Health Economics

I am currently accepting PhDs in Applied Health Sciences and Economics.

Overview
Professor Marjon Van der Pol
Professor Marjon Van der Pol

Contact Details


Biography

Marjon is a Professor of Health Economics and the Depute Director of HERU. Marjon is also the director of teaching in HERU. She joined HERU as a Senior Research Fellow in May 2004. She worked in HERU from 1995 to 2001 as a Research Fellow and at the University of Calgary (Canada) from 2002 to 2004 as Assistant Professor. Marjon is also an honorary Professor at the Behavioural Science Centre at the University of Stirling.

Marjon's main research interest is in the relationship between time and risk preferences and health (behaviours). Current research focuses on the role of risk preferences in GP migration, the role of time preference in the intergenerational transfer of health behaviours, robustness of time preference measurement and developing health behaviour interventions that draw on the concept of time preference.  Marjon also has an interest in the use financial incentives in health behaviours and conducts research into the cost-effectiveness of health interventions. Research focuses on interventions that have an important behavioural component including weight loss, dental care and self-management of chronic conditions.

 

RePEc

Curriculum Vitae


Qualifications

PhD, Economics University of Aberdeen 2000
MSc, Business economics University of Nijmegen (Netherlands) 1995

External Memberships and Affiliations

Associate Editor for Health Economics

Chair of the Steering Group for Scottish Health Economics (SHE)

MRC Skills Development Panel, Deputy Chair, 2016 – 2020

Research

Research Areas

Please get in touch if you would like to discuss your research ideas further.

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Specialisms

  • Applied Economics
  • Health and Welfare

Research Overview

Marjon's main research interest is in the relationship between time and risk preferences and health (behaviours). Current research focuses on the role of risk preferences in GP migration, the role of time preference in the intergenerational transfer of health behaviours, robustness of time preference measurement and developing health behaviour interventions that draw on the concept of time preference.  Marjon also has an interest in the use financial incentives in health behaviours and conducts research into the cost-effectiveness of health interventions. Research focuses on interventions that have an important behavioural component including weight loss, dental care and self-management of chronic conditions.


Supervision

My current supervision areas are: Applied Health Sciences and Economics.


Melanie Antunes, Public and patients preferences for social prescribing. University of Aberdeen, 2019-.

Xuemin Zhu, The role of the physician’s risk and time preferences and personality in clinical decision making. University of Aberdeen, 2018-.

Uma Thomas, Seeing into the future: the role of time preferences in changing health behaviours. University of Aberdeen, 2016-.

Dwayne Boyers, Measuring value within an economic evaluation framework: a case study of dental care, University of Aberdeen, awarded 2019.

Laura Dysart, Economic methods to optimise self management, University of Aberdeen, awarded 2018.

Alastair Irvine, Hyperbolic discounting in health decision making; examining patients’ and doctors’ time preferences in relation to adherence, University of Aberdeen, Awarded 2018.

Ewan Gray, Intertemporal preferences for future health events, University of Aberdeen, awarded 2012.

Graham Scotland, Valuing outcomes in economic evaluations of maternal and reproductive health care interventions, University of Aberdeen, awarded 2011.


Research Funding and Grants

Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of text message and endowment incentives for weight management in men with obesity: the Game of Stones randomised controlled trial.  NIHR Public Health Research £1,669,377, 2020-2024, Co-I.

Pulpotomy for the management of irreversible pulpitis in mature teeth (Pulpotomy for Irreversible Pulpitis - PIP Trial) NIHR HTA £1,996,749, 2020-2024, Co-I.

Selective Caries Removal in Permanent Teeth (Script). NIHR HTA £2,305,508, 2019-2024, Co-I

Feasibility study of how best to engage obese men in narrative SMS (short message system) and incentive interventions for weight loss, to inform a future effectiveness and cost- effectiveness trial. NIHR Public Health Research Programme, £490,970, 2016-2018, Co-I.

INTERVAL Dental Recalls Trial: full trial follow-on. NIHR HTA. £2,670,030. 2011-2018, Co-I.

Improving the Quality of Dentistry (IQuaD): A randomised controlled trial comparing oral hygiene advice and periodontal instrumentation for the prevention and management of periodontal disease in dentate adults attending dental primary care. NIHR HTA £2,447,081. 2011-2017, Co-I.

Avoidable Scottish Hospitalisations (ASH). CSO, £187,821 . 2013-2015, PI.

Can eliciting and addressing health-related goals improve asthma control and asthma-related quality of life? Feasibility Phase II pilot randomised controlled trial of a brief intervention. CSO, £176,957. 2012-2013, Co-I.

Are ‘potentially preventable hospitalisations’ a valid measure of the quality and affordability of primary and community care in Australia? NHMRC (National Health Medical Research Council, Australia). $AUD 387,140. 2012-2014, Co-I.

Improving the Efficient and Equitable Care of Patients with Chronic Medical Conditions Interdisciplinary Chronic Disease Collaboration (ICDC). Alberta Heritage for Medical Research (Canada), Interdisciplinary team grant, $5,854,920. 2009-2014, Co-I.

The role of elective neck dissection in patients with early oral squamous cell carcinoma (1- 3cm primary size) and no clinical evidence of lymph node metastases in the neck (N0) (Acronym - SEND), CRUK, £743,296. 2007-2014, Co-I.

Improving health and health behaviours through serious games. Royal Society of Edinburgh.

£4,500. 2011-2012, Co-I.

The use of global position satellite tracking in wandering patients with dementia: feasibility study. CSO, £46,685. 2011-2012, Co-I.

An evaluation to assess the effectiveness of ‘Quit 4 U’.    NHS Health Scotland, £135,000. 2009-2012, Co-I.

Telemetric supported self-monitoring of long-term conditions. CSO NHS Applied Research Programme grant, £930,277. 2008-2012, Co-I.

INTERVAL Dental Recalls Trial: a feasibility study and follow-on. NIHR HTA. £596,212. 2009-2011, Co-I.

A randomized control trial of the effect of exercise capacity in older patients with heart failure. CSO. £213,465. 2007-2010, Co-I.

Economic evaluation of tele-endoscopy. Scottish Centre for Telehealth. £12,643. 2008-2009, PI.

Multi-method study of telehomecare video-visits in rural Alberta. Canadian Institute of Health Research, $420,000. 2003-2006, Co-I.

Eliciting public’s preferences for priority setting of new pharmaceuticals. Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, $30,249. 2005-2006, CO-I.

Valuation of time spent on waiting lists: an economics approach. Western Canada Waiting List Project. $9,950. 2003-2004, Co-I.

Eliciting preferences for new interventions: a comparison of decision makers and the public with regards to priority setting. Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, $9,950. 2003, Co- I.

Teaching

Courses


Teaching Responsibilities

Director of Teaching, HERU

Publications

Publications 

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