The Centre offers a variety of study opportunities, from undergraduate courses to postgraduate research programmes. The tabs below provide more information about what is available.

Undergraduate Study

Scott features on several undergraduate courses at the University of Aberdeen and undergraduates are welcome to participate in the Centre’s activities.

In particular Scott is taught on:

EL3507: Union, Enlightenment and Modernity: Scottish Literature 1750 – 1850

EL40QT: Historical Nation: Writing Scotland’s Past

For more details of these courses see https://www.abdn.ac.uk/registry/courses/study/english

Postgraduate Study

Students wishing to study Scott at the University of Aberdeen may wish to apply for the M.Litt in English Literary Studies. Scott features on several courses.

 

Please contact us if you have any questions:

School of Language, Literature, Music & Visual Culture
King’s College, Old Aberdeen, 
Aberdeen, 
Scotland, 
AB24 3UB
Email: langlit.school@abdn.ac.uk

 

 

 
Postgraduate Research

 

Many PhD students have studied Scott at the University of Aberdeen on topics including a critical edition of Marmion, Scott and Orientalism, Scott and adaptation, Scott, Austen and the Romantic family, the female body in Walter Scott and Scott and models of transnational identity.

 

The Centre welcomes projects on any aspect of Walter Scott including the historical, critical, theoretical and social contexts in which he can be situated, his legacies and afterlives, and on book and publishing history.

Anyone wishing to undertke a PhD on Scott should contact:

Professor Alison Lumsden
School of Language, Literature, Music & Visual Culture
King’s College, Old Aberdeen, 
Aberdeen, 
Scotland, 
AB24 3UB
Email: a.lumsden@abdn.ac.uk

Details on how to apply for PhD programme at Aberdeen and funding opportunities can be found here.

Current Postgraduates and Their Projects

Our current and previously graduated students with projects relating to the Walter Scott Research Centre include:

Paul Arant: Paul's research focuses on Translationaism and identity in Walter Scott's Waverley Novels.

Lisa McKenna: Lisa is working on problems posed by closure and non-closure in a selection of Scott’s text.

Mary Nestor: Mary’s thesis is on adaptations of Scott and their relationship to his cultural legacy.

Chriselle McKinnon: Chriselle is working on images of the female body in Scott’s work and what these represent.

Anna Fancett: Anna has recently successfully defended her doctoral thesis on the role and function of the family in the novels of Scott and Austen.