Insights into the Earth’s most extreme locations at the British Science Festival

Insights into the Earth’s most extreme locations at the British Science Festival

Groundbreaking scientific research in some of the world’s most extreme locations will come under the spotlight in Aberdeen next week.

Pioneering work exploring the depths at which life can exist in a remote sub-glacial lake in Antarctica will be among the topics discussed during the British Science Festival, which takes place at locations throughout the city and Aberdeenshire from September 4 – 9.

The future of the planet’s polar regions will also be among the debates at the Festival which is being organised by the British Science Association, the University of Aberdeen and Techfest-Setpoint.

Among the fascinating science to be covered through the diverse programme of hundreds of public lectures, family fun events and workshops offered at the Festival:

The future of our polar regions: What must we do and how can science help?Join leading UK polar scientists in an interactive debate about whether future research should be directed towards the north – the Arctic – or the south – the Antarctic. An exhibition of polar fieldwork clothing, science equipment and field video diaries will also be on display at the event which takes place in the University’s Fraser Noble Building on Tuesday September 4 from 3.30pm- 5.30pm and is free to attend

Our fossil-fuelled future Explore the role that fossils have to play in everyday life and the techniques palaeontologists are using to understand how ancient lives affect modern ones in this free event which takes place on Wednesday September 5 from 10am – 12noon in the University’s Regent Building.

Life down below: The search for a deep biosphere on Earth and beyond Much simple life on Earth lives in the subsurface with some scientists believing that the majority of life is actually below ground. The event provides an opportunity to hear from scientists working at the forefront of exploring the limits of life on Earth, including those taking part in the Lake Ellsworth project to search for life forms in the water and clues to past climate in the buried lake 3 km beneath the centre of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The event is free to attend and takes place on Friday September 7 from 10am – 12noon in the University’s Fraser Noble Building.

Younger members of the family will also have the chance to learn more about life on Earth in events taking place as part of the Festival. Highlights include Frozen Science: Life and work at polar extremes– a free event which will offer an insight into what it’s like to live and work in the Polar regions on Saturday September 8 and Sunday September 9 from 9.30am – 4.30pm at Aberdeen Beach Ballroom.

Dr Ken Skeldon, Head of Public Engagement with Research at the University of Aberdeen and co-chair of the Festival’s programming group, said: “The British Science Festival will bring fascinating science to audiences in Aberdeen city and shire through a diverse range of events – from public lectures and workshops to fun, interactive activities for all the family.

“Insights into the groundbreaking work being undertaken in some of the world’s most extreme locations will be just some of the topics covered at the Festival, which we hope will cater for all interests and ages.”

British Science Festivalevents can be booked online by visiting http://www.britishscienceassociation.org/ or by ringing 08456 807 207.

The British Science Festival 2012is being organised by the British Science Association, the University of Aberdeen and Techfest-Setpoint. The principal sponsors are BP and Shell U.K. Limited.

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