production
Skip to Content

HI301W: CULTURES OF RESISTANCE: WOMEN'S ACTIVISM IN THE USA SINCE 1900 (2022-2023)

Last modified: 04 Oct 2022 15:00


Course Overview

This course examines over a century of women’s activism in the United States. It will disrupt top-down histories that centre a singular narrative of women’s history in the US to instead consider the diverse and multifaceted forms of activism and coalition-building enacted by women of colour, poor, working class and queer women. By examining a range of sources and media including zines, poetry and podcasts, and key topics such as birth control, incarceration and #MeToo, we will examine how far the United States has come, and how far it still has to go.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Olivia Wright

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Either Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

Since the election of Donald Trump in 2016, women’s rights in the United States have been in a state of turmoil. From the Women’s March in 2017, to the overturn of Roe vs Wade in 2022, women’s rights have been at the forefront of politics and culture, and the study of women’s history has never been so important. What can we learn from histories of gender and activism in the US? What challenges have American women faced in the past and how have they responded? How have they organised and used cultural tools to resist? And how can we relate this to our own position in contemporary society?

This module will trace a lineage of women’s activism in the United States throughout the 20th century and up to the present day, exploring the intersections of race, gender, sexuality and class. By examining a variety of source materials including music, print culture, poetry, podcasts and social media, we will consider how communities of women in the US have used cultural tools and artistic expression to resist the racism, sexism, classism, homophobia and transphobia in American society. From the early Birth Control movement to juvenile delinquency, anti-prison activism and Riot Grrrls, it will trace the moments and movements that have shaped contemporary America and the cultural outputs that have sustained and defined them.

The assessment for the module consists of three parts: weekly provocations and seminar participation; a 3,000-word essay, and a Cultures of Resistance Group Project whereby you will be asked to work in small groups to research a group or organisation who relate to the key areas and debates that we are exploring each week and collectively present this information through a creative format.


Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 1 Seminar during University weeks 8 - 18

More Information about Week Numbers


Details, including assessments, may be subject to change until 31 August 2023 for 1st half-session courses and 22 December 2023 for 2nd half-session courses.

Summative Assessments

Group Project

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 40
Assessment Weeks 20 Feedback Weeks 24

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

This assessment asks students to research an individual/organisation who relate to the key areas and debates that we are exploring each week and collectively present this information through a creative format. This might include zines, podcasts, PowerPoints, vlogs or posters and does not require live oral presentation. There is a workshop midway through the module to facilitate the group work.

Comments and grades will be delivered via email to the individual groups and further feedback will be provided through in-person meetings.

Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualApplyBe familiar with key gender and race theory and recent historiographical developments
ConceptualEvaluateApply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American History, drawing on approaches derived from sociology, literary criticism and American cultural studies
ConceptualUnderstandBe aware of and understand how factors such as race, gender, sexuality and class impact upon society, politics and culture and the study of history
FactualUnderstandHave a broad understanding of women’s history and social movements in the United States since 1900 and how culture can be utilised as a form of activism
ProceduralAnalyseDevelop skills analysing a variety of sources and media including visual culture, music, podcasts, print culture, novels, speeches and organisational records

Essay

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 50
Assessment Weeks 15 Feedback Weeks 17

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

Written feedback will be provided via email as well as the opportunity to get further feedback in in-person meetings

Word Count 3000
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualApplyBe familiar with key gender and race theory and recent historiographical developments
ConceptualEvaluateApply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American History, drawing on approaches derived from sociology, literary criticism and American cultural studies
ConceptualUnderstandBe aware of and understand how factors such as race, gender, sexuality and class impact upon society, politics and culture and the study of history
FactualUnderstandHave a broad understanding of women’s history and social movements in the United States since 1900 and how culture can be utilised as a form of activism
ProceduralAnalyseDevelop skills analysing a variety of sources and media including visual culture, music, podcasts, print culture, novels, speeches and organisational records

Tutorial/Seminar Participation

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 10
Assessment Weeks Feedback Weeks 20

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

Part of this participation element involves weekly “provocations” whereby students are expected to email the course coordinator with 3 thoughts, questions or ideas related to the weekly readings (or their wider reading) at least 24hrs ahead of the seminar. This contributes to their overall participation mark.

Feedback will be in the form of email notification of marks with comments; general remarks in class and on MyAberdeen.

Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualApplyBe familiar with key gender and race theory and recent historiographical developments
ConceptualEvaluateApply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American History, drawing on approaches derived from sociology, literary criticism and American cultural studies
ConceptualUnderstandBe aware of and understand how factors such as race, gender, sexuality and class impact upon society, politics and culture and the study of history
FactualUnderstandHave a broad understanding of women’s history and social movements in the United States since 1900 and how culture can be utilised as a form of activism
ProceduralAnalyseDevelop skills analysing a variety of sources and media including visual culture, music, podcasts, print culture, novels, speeches and organisational records

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Resit Assessments

Essay

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 100
Assessment Weeks Feedback Weeks

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

Feedback will be in the form of email notification of marks with comments and via the MyAberdeen marking system.

Word Count 3500
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
Sorry, we don't have this information available just now. Please check the course guide on MyAberdeen or with the Course Coordinator

Course Learning Outcomes

Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
FactualUnderstandHave a broad understanding of women’s history and social movements in the United States since 1900 and how culture can be utilised as a form of activism
ConceptualApplyBe familiar with key gender and race theory and recent historiographical developments
ConceptualUnderstandBe aware of and understand how factors such as race, gender, sexuality and class impact upon society, politics and culture and the study of history
ConceptualEvaluateApply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American History, drawing on approaches derived from sociology, literary criticism and American cultural studies
ProceduralAnalyseDevelop skills analysing a variety of sources and media including visual culture, music, podcasts, print culture, novels, speeches and organisational records

Compatibility Mode

We have detected that you are have compatibility mode enabled or are using an old version of Internet Explorer. You either need to switch off compatibility mode for this site or upgrade your browser.