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PI4576: WEALTH, POVERTY AND INTERNATIONAL ORDER (2020-2021)

Last modified: 30 Jul 2020 13:40


Course Overview

This course introduces advanced Politics and International Relations students to different ways of thinking about how the production of wealth and poverty serves to sediment economic, political and cultural hierarchies globally, especially how international practices depend on the re-production of these hierarchies for their legitimation.

Beginning with a reading of some classic texts on the sources of wealth and poverty, the course offers a close theoretical and historical investigation of the silences around questions of wealth and poverty in dominant understandings of the contemporary shape of the world, including questions of development, gender, security, and human rights.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 4
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Ritu Vij

Qualification Prerequisites

  • Programme Level 4

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Either Programme Level 4 or Programme Level 5
  • Either International Relations (IR) (Studied) or Politics (PI) (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

This course attempts to introduce advanced Politics and International Relations students to different ways of thinking about how the production of wealth and poverty serves to sediment economic, political and cultural hierarchies globally, especially how international practices (concerned with human rights, development, and security, for instance) depend on the re-production of these hierarchies for their legitimation.

Main Learning Outcomes
The link between the production of wealth and poverty in stabilising (or de-stabilising) international order within the disciplinary study of International Relations is rarely made central to extant discussion. By the end of this course, students will be able to:

* Identify and critically analyse key texts, classical and contemporary, on the systematic production of wealth and poverty in a global context.

* Identify and critically discuss the consequences of the erasure of questions of wealth and poverty in theoretical approaches to the study of International Relations

* Understand how silences about wealth and poverty have been crucial to shaping understanding and management of key areas like development, security, human rights etc. within the practice of International Relations.

Beginning with a reading of some classic texts on the sources of wealth and poverty, as well as contemporary critical IR scholarship on this theme, the course offers a close theoretical and historical investigation of the silences around questions of wealth and poverty in dominant understandings of the contemporary shape of the world, including questions of development, gender, security, and human rights. The course concludes with a consideration of how contemporary processes of the precarisation of labor are re-ordering the global distribution of wealth and poverty.


Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 1 Tutorial during University weeks 25 - 29, 31 - 34, 38

More Information about Week Numbers


In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for courses may be subject to change. All updates for first-half session courses will be actioned no later than 1700 (GMT) on 18 September 2020. All updates for second half-session courses will be actioned in advance of second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

Summative Assessments

4500 word essay 50%

Take-home Exam 50%

 

Resit (for students who took the course in Academic Year 2020/21):   

Exam 100%

Resit (for students who took the course in Academic Year 2019/20 or for C8 students):   
 
Exam 100%

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Course Learning Outcomes

Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome

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