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LX4577: CRIMINOLOGY (2020-2021)

Last modified: 05 Aug 2021 13:04


Course Overview

This course examines theories that attempt to explain why people act in a deviant or criminal manner. We will consider theories that explain deviance (in whole or in part) as the product of (1) biological features of the deviant; (2) economic forces; (3) environmental conditions; and (4) the 'labels' social groups assign to certain types of conduct. We will also look at the means by which criminal statistics are gathered, and the extent to which they are accurate. The course is taught through seven 1hour lectures and six 1hour seminars. There is one assessed essay (33%) and an exam (67%).

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 4
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Elizabeth Shaw

Qualification Prerequisites

  • One of Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4 or Programme Level 5

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Legal Studies (Ma Honours) (LX) (Studied)
  • One of Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4 or Programme Level 5
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

Course Aims: This course aims to introduce students to the study of criminology and to various schools of thought in this field, and to encourage them to think critically about the causes of crime, society?s response to crime and the definition of crime itself. Main Learning Outcomes: Knowledge and Understanding Students will understand the main theoretical accounts of crime and social responses to it, and acquire some insights into the social, political and economic contexts within which crime occurs. In addition, they will gain awareness of the multiplicity of factors involved in committing a criminal act. Subject Specific Skills and Concepts Students will develop social scientific methods of study and analysis. They will learn how to think critically and creatively, to think at a conceptual level and apply theoretical models, to analyse and synthesise material from a variety of sources and to evaluate the merits of competing arguments. Students will develop the ability to express themselves, both orally and in writing, in a clear and persuasive fashion, to debate complex and emotive issues in a group situation, to listen effectively and to engage in independent and critical research. They are required to produce coursework which is fully referenced, using correct legal citations and to retrieve a range of up-to-date legal materials in electronic and non-electronic formats. Key Skills (Transferable)
  • Ability to conduct further personal research with a fair degree of confidence.
  • Ability to communicate, in writing, the results of personal research.
  • Ability to argue logically and support arguments with evidence.
  • Ability to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information, when conducting research projects.
  • Ability to work effectively in small groups.
  • To develop time management skills. Content: This course chiefly examines theories that attempt to explain why people act in a deviant or criminal manner. We will consider theories that explain deviance (in whole or in part) as the product of (1) biological features of the deviant; (2) economic forces; (3) environmental conditions; and (4) the 'labels' social groups assign to certain types of conduct. We will also look at the means by which criminal statistics are gathered, and the extent to which they are accurate.

  • In light of Covid-19 this information is indicative and may be subject to change.

    Contact Teaching Time

    Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

    Teaching Breakdown

    • 1 Seminar during University weeks 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 38, 39

    More Information about Week Numbers


    In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for second half-session courses may be subject to change. All updates for second-half session courses will be actioned in advance of the second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

    Summative Assessments

    2500 word essay 40%

    3000 word essay 60%

     

     

    Resit: resubmission of failed elements

    Formative Assessment

    There are no assessments for this course.

    Course Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
    FactualRememberILO’s for this course are available in the course guide.

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