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FS3010: CINEMA AND SCIENCE: BEYOND FICTION A (2020-2021)

Last modified: 07 Jul 2020 13:35


Course Overview

For much of the twentieth century, the cinema has provided mass audiences with a powerful and accessible source of images and ideas about many aspects of science, medicine and healthcare, including the notion of scientific evidence and objectivity, laboratory experimentation, science and human rights, the relationship between doctor and patient, the public image of scientists, the encounter between human and non-human animals. This course seeks to understand the complex relations between cinema and science, by critically examining a diverse body of works coming from different filmic traditions, genres and periods, challenging the cliché of the mad scientist often represented in mainstream Hollywood cinema.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators

Sorry, we don't have a record of any course coordinators.

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme
  • Programme Level 3
  • Either Film And Visual Culture (FS) or Literature In A World Context (LW)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

Yes

One or more of these courses have a limited number of places. Priority access will be given to students for whom this course is compulsory. Please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions for more details on this process.


Course Description

From sci-fi to computer simulated graphics to mind-expanding documentaries, science and film have always gravitated toward one another. For much of the twentieth century, the cinema has provided mass audiences with a powerful and accessible source of images and ideas about many aspects of science, medicine and healthcare, including the notion of scientific evidence and objectivity, laboratory experimentation, science and human rights, the relationship between doctor and patient, the public image of scientists, the encounter between human and non-human animals. This course seeks to understand the complex relations between cinema and science by critically examining a diverse body of works coming from different filmic traditions, genres and periods, challenging the cliché of the mad scientist often represented in mainstream Hollywood cinema. Students will acquire the critical tools to navigate and counteract the widely spread misconceptions arising from both pseudo-science and biased media (mis)representations of scientific achievements. Readings will be at the crossroad of film theory and history, medical humanities, visual culture, science and technology studies (STS).


Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 1 Seminar during University weeks 8 - 12, 14 - 18
  • 1 Workshop during University weeks 9, 14, 17
  • 2 Workshops during University week16

More Information about Week Numbers


In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for courses may be subject to change. All updates for first-half session courses will be actioned no later than 1700 (GMT) on 18 September 2020. All updates for second half-session courses will be actioned in advance of second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

Summative Assessments

1000 word reflexive essay (30%)

2000 word research essay (50%)

Seminar Assesment Mark (20%)

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Course Learning Outcomes

Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ProceduralAnalyseConduct a close-reading and analysis of films identifying patterns, motives, forms.
ProceduralCreateEngage in critical thinking and creative practice in relation to the practice-based component of the course.
ProceduralApplyExpand the conceptual toolkit of film theory and visual culture through notions coming from science and technology studies (STS).
FactualRememberDemonstrate an understanding of the various configurations of the relationship between cinema and science beyond science fiction.
ReflectionEvaluateDemonstrate the ability to create a presentation to communicate and/or engage the wider public with science using an audio-visual medium.
ProceduralCreateConstruct coherent arguments and demonstrate enhanced skills in written, oral and visual communications.
ConceptualUnderstandDemonstrate an understanding of critical approaches related to the study of film, science and visual culture.

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