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CE3596: CELTIC AND ANGLO-SAXON MANUSCRIPT-STUDIES (2018-2019)

Last modified: 22 May 2019 17:07


Course Overview

This course provides an in-depth introduction to Insular script and Insular book-production. The student will, from the start, work with examples of the script and learn to read, describe, date, and localise its various forms. The history of the Insular book is an essential component of any understanding of mediaeval Celtic and Anglo-Saxon cultures.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Professor David Dumville

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Programme Level 3
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

A distinctive sub-Roman polymorphous script-form and mode of book-production was created in Celtic Britain and Ireland in the fifth or sixth century; this has long since been named 'Insular'. These forms gained remarkable European diffusion over succeeding centuries, being used at varying times as far afield as Italy and Scandinavia (and perhaps Ukraine!), particularly through the activities of English and Gaelic clergy. After about 1200, Insular script and book-production became purely Gaelic modes, albeit used for both vernacular and Latin writing. Printing in Irish extended over some four centuries from the later sixteenth century, in forms adapted from Insular script; this Gaelic type was used in Irish governmental publications from independence in 1921/2 until 1948, and 'Irish' (that is, Insular) script was taught in schools during the same period. In sum, this script-form had a life of about 1500 years and, at the height of its popularity, was a much more general European phenomenon. This course provides an in-depth introduction to Insular script and Insular book-production. The student will, from the start, work with examples of the script and learn to read, describe, date, and localise its various forms. The history of the Insular book is an essential component of any understanding of mediaeval Celtic and Anglo-Saxon cultures.

Further Information & Notes

This course is available to students on all degree programmes (other than Celtic & Anglo-Saxon Studies) as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. The course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with its counterpart in the other Honours year.


In light of Covid-19 this information is indicative and may be subject to change.

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 2 Seminars during University weeks 25 - 35

More Information about Week Numbers


In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for second half-session courses may be subject to change. All updates for second-half session courses will be actioned in advance of the second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

Summative Assessments

1st Attempt: 1 three-hour written examination (100%) Resit: 1 three-hour written examination (100%)

Formative Assessment

Students will complete numerous formative practical class-exercises. Discussion of students' progress will be provided in scheduled individual meetings and/or in the instructor's office hours.

Feedback

Written assessments are given CAS marks, and written feedback is communicated to students using the School of Language and Literature essay cover sheets. Feedback will also be provided in scheduled individual meetings and/or in the instructor's office hours. Students are given weekly feedback in the form of advice delivered verbally in class, both to individuals and to the whole class.

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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