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HI406B: GERMANY, 1517 - 1806: REFORMATION, EMPIRE AND ENLIGHTENMENT (2017-2018)

Last modified: 25 May 2018 11:16


Course Overview

Composed of hundreds of territories, the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation seemed an incoherent patchwork. Yet it functioned as a political entity for centuries. This course studies the profound transformation of Germany from the onset of the Reformation to the destruction of the Empire by Napoleon. We will look at religious conflict, the impact of war, the early Enlightenment and the development of early national identity. The question we have to ask is not why did the Holy Roman Empire fail, but why and how did it survive for such a long period? 

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 4
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Professor Karin Friedrich

Qualification Prerequisites

  • Programme Level 4

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

  • HI30BD Germany 1517-1806: Reformation, Empire and Enlightenment (Passed)

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

Composed of hundreds of principalities, cities, bishoprics and other territories, the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation as Germany was then called - seemed an incoherent patchwork, yet it functioned as a political entity for centuries. This course studies the great diversity of German history at a time of profound transformation, from the onset of the Reformation to the destruction of the Empire by Napoleon in the early years of the nineteenth century. We will look at religious conflict and social rebellion, the impact of war on society, the important role of German cities, the relationship between Empire and territorial states, Baroque culture, the impact of the early Enlightenment, the changing idea of Empire and the development of early national identity. As for much of this time the Empire was a battlefield for the diverse interests of European dynasties in the 'heart of Europe', we will explore the relationship between Germany and its neighbours. The question we have to ask is not why did the Holy Roman Empire fail, but why and how did it survive for such a long period?

Further Information & Notes

This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a discipline breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy. This course may not be included in a graduating curriculum with HI30BD/HI355L.


Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

More Information about Week Numbers


Summative Assessments

The assessment will be:

3 hour exam (50%), 3,000 word essay (30%), 1,000 word comparative book review (10%) and seminar participation (10%).

Formative Assessment

Verbal feedback on seminar presentations and one-to-one meetings on essay planning and bibliographies.

Feedback

Assessment specific feeback via standard feedback forms is given on the essay.

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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