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HI354G: 'CITY OF THE WORLD': LONDON IN THE LONG EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (2016-2017)

Last modified: 28 Jun 2018 10:27


Course Overview

By the late seventeenth century London was already one of Western Europe's largest and most important cities; by 1832 it was indisputably a 'world city', dominating processes of imperialism, finance, and international trade. This course focuses on the social and cultural processes that underpinned the city's 'metropolitan' status. It explores how the city acted as human magnate, drawing in immigrants from Britain, Europe, North America, Africa and Asia while acting as the controlling metropolis for Britain's increasingly global empire. It assesses eighteenth-century London politics, elites, the emergence of the 'middling sort', as well as its criminals and its social-sexual outcasts. The class concludes by examing how the city was represented within the vibrant medium of caricature and in the novel by focusing on the themes of life, death and the possibilities of a new 'urban' morality.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Andrew MacKillop

Qualification Prerequisites

None.

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

  • HI303A 'City of the World': London in the Long Eighteenth Century, 1688-1832 (Studied)
  • HI304G City of the World: London in the Long Eighteenth Century, 1688-1832 (Studied)
  • (Studied)

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

By the late seventeenth century London was already one of Western Europe's largest and most important cities; by 1832 it was indisputably a 'world city', dominating processes of imperialism, finance, and international trade. This course focuses on the social and cultural processes that underpinned the city's 'metropolitan' status. It explores how the city acted as human magnate, drawing in immigrants from Britain, Europe, North America, Africa and Asia while acting as the controlling metropolis for Britain's increasingly global empire. It assesses eighteenth-century London politics, elites, the emergence of the 'middling sort', as well as its criminals and its social-sexual outcasts. The class concludes by examing how the city was represented within the vibrant medium of caricature and in the novel by focusing on the themes of life, death and the possibilities of a new 'urban' morality.

Further Information & Notes

This module is available to students on all non-History degree programmes as a Discipline Breadth course for the enhanced study requirement. However, the admission of students with a non-History degree intention will be at the discretion of the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy.


Details for second half-session courses, including assessments, may be subject to change until 23 December 2022.

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

None.

More Information about Week Numbers


Details for second half-session courses, including assessments, may be subject to change until 23 December 2022.

Summative Assessments

1st Attempt

  • 1500-word source review (20%)
  • 1500 class presentation (20%)
  • 4000-word essay (50%)
  • Seminar contribution (10%)

Resit

  • Source review (25%)
  • Book review (25%)
  • Essay (50%)

Formative Assessment

Formative assessment includes weekly feedback on one page hand written analyses of secondary and primary sources relating to each seminar theme. These formative pieces are submitted weekly and are intended to develop and hone the students' abilities to comprehend, analyse and present arguments and understanding of a wide range of primary and secondary materials. Similarly, and essay plan and bibliography are to be submitted and will be returned with comments, suggestions etc.

Feedback

Verbal feedback is given on all aspects of student performance in individual meetings. Specific written (via essay feedback forms) and verbal feedback is given on essays, primary source reviews and class presentations.

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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