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HI1523: RENAISSANCES AND REFORMATIONS (2015-2016)

Last modified: 25 Mar 2016 11:33


Course Overview

The course provides a broad overview of the changes which the Renaissance and Reformations introduced to European culture, politics, religion, society and people’s understanding of their role in the world. It traces these developments in a comparative way, from Europe’s Atlantic cost to East Central Europe and Russia, throughout a changing image of the world and its relationship to the spiritual, brought on by Renaissance, a time of unrest triggered by European Reformations, the radical and magisterial reformations, European expansion, the growth of monarchies and republics, and the wars of religion of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. For more information please see course guide.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 1
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Professor Karin Friedrich

Qualification Prerequisites

None.

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Either Programme Level 1 or Programme Level 2

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

The course provides a broad overview of the changes which the Renaissance and Reformations introduced to European culture, politics, religion, society and people’s understanding of their role in the world. It traces these developments in a comparative way, from Europe’s Atlantic cost to East Central Europe and Russia, throughout a changing image of the world and its relationship to the spiritual, brought on by Renaissance, a time of unrest triggered by the European Reformations, the radical and the magisterial reformations, European expansion, the growth of monarchies and republics, and the wars of religion of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It concludes with the onset of the early Enlightenment and an analysis of absolutist court culture. A chronological approach is combined with a thematic survey of major historical movements, concepts, ideas and developments, such as monarchy, nobility, secularisation, serfdom and feudalism, urbanisation, sexuality and everyday life, witchcraft and popular belief, court culture, mercantilism, and warfare.

In light of Covid-19 this information is indicative and may be subject to change.

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

None.

More Information about Week Numbers


In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for second half-session courses may be subject to change. All updates for second-half session courses will be actioned in advance of the second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

Summative Assessments

1st Attempt: Assessment is based on:
Written essay (40%) of the final assessment and two-hour degree examination at (60%) of the final assessment.

Resit: Final examination (100%).

Formative Assessment

A book-review (formal) or a draft essay (informal) to return feedback on writing examples before students hand in their essays. Also possible forms: chairing of discussion and presentation sessions, etc., role play assuming historical characters and debates.

Feedback

One-to-one essay return as soon as possible, with plenty of comments, advice in improvement and, if necessary, information about learning support courses at the university; office hours, class meetings, mixed tutor- and peer assessment by students and discussion thereof.

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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