production
Skip to Content

Undergraduate KL Coded Courses - Flexible Arts And Social Sciences 2014-2015

KL10F1: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 1

15 credits

Level 1

First Sub Session

Sociology is the study of human social groups. It particularly focuses on modern societies, analyzing how they work and how the major social institutions in them (such as religion, the media, government and the economy) operate. The course presents students with a general introduction to the unique manner in which sociologists seek to understand contemporary societies. Students are presented with current and classical approaches to understanding the social processes that underlie self-construction, group formation and social interaction, within urbanizing and globalizing social contexts.

KL10F7: INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

15 credits

Level 1

First Sub Session

The course covers a broad range of key historical events throughout the twentieth century before specific attention to the contemporary situation is provided. It introduces students to the development of International Relations as a discipline, but also to key concepts and analytical skills required to study the subject at a higher level.

KL10F8: INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY

15 credits

Level 1

First Sub Session

This introductory course will trace major developments in the history of art in the western world from Classical art and architecture in ancient Greece to the beginnings of photography in the nineteenth century.  Aspects of European art to be explored, through painting, prints, sculpture and architecture, will range from the Classicism of Greece and Rome to the rise of the Medieval Gothic cathedrals, the rebirth of Classicism in the Renaissance to the grandeur of the Baroque and the ornament of the Rococo, and the revolutionary order of Neo-Classicism to the imagination and emotion of Romanticism.

KL10F9: ENGLISH STRUCTURE AND USE

15 credits

Level 1

Second Sub Session

This course opens up new ways for students to think about language by introducing them to the fundamentals of English linguistics. Students will learn how to identify and analyse the major "building blocks" of language in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Examples for illustration and discussion will be drawn from varieties of English spoken in the British Isles and worldwide, with lectures and tutorials geared to providing students with an active vocabulary with which to discuss language, and essential tools with which to analyse its structure and function.

KL1597: INTRODUCTION TO SCOTTISH HISTORY

15 credits

Level 1

Second Sub Session

 

Scotland is one of the oldest political units in Western Europe, arguably emerging as a discernible entity by no later than the middle-to-late 10th century. The overall objective of this course is to chart the underlying continuities and radical changes that mark the nation’s historical development since the early 12th century up to the present day. In doing so it aims to assess and question the value of, and the problems inherent in, studying societies through the prism of national history. 

KL15F2: CONTROVERSIAL CLASSICS

15 credits

Level 1

Second Sub Session

Literature can provoke, offend and disturb as well as entertain. This course considers some of the most powerful and controversial works of modern literature. It examines the circumstances of publication, the nature of the controversy, and the cultural and critical impact of each work. The course shows how poems, plays and novels can raise searching questions about national, racial and personal identity, and looks at the methods used by writers to challenge their readers, as well the responses of readers to such challenges.

KL15F7: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 2

15 credits

Level 1

Second Sub Session

This course is an introduction to macro-sociology, which analyses the ways that people’s lives are shaped by large-scale forces, structures, and institutions. Students are introduced to the particular ways in which classical and contemporary sociologists understand social forces in the modern domestic and global environment and learn to think critically about those social forces that impact their everyday lives using the sociological imagination. Substantive topics likely to be covered in this course include the media, politics, religion, surveillance, education, class stratification, international inequalities, and the relationship between humans and other animals.

Compatibility Mode

We have detected that you are have compatibility mode enabled or are using an old version of Internet Explorer. You either need to switch off compatibility mode for this site or upgrade your browser.