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EL40GT: NEO-VICTORIANISM (2014-2015)

Last modified: 28 Jun 2018 10:27


Course Overview

What is the Neo-Victorian novel? How can modern forms of fiction complicate our understanding of nineteenth-century literature and culture? And to what extent does historical fiction deepen present-day debates about representations of class, race, gender, sexuality, science and selfhood? We will consider a range of literary engagements with the Victorian novel from the 1960s to the present, including feminist, queer, postmodern and postcolonial approaches and their theoretical contexts. With attentiveness to intertextuality, appropriation and adaptation we will work towards an understanding of the continued influence of Victorian developments of the novel genre in modern literature.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 4
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Alexandra Lewis

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

None.

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

What is the Neo-Victorian novel? How can modern forms of fiction complicate our understanding of nineteenth-century literature and culture? And to what extent does historical fiction deepen present-day debates about representations of class, race, gender, sexuality, science and selfhood? We will consider a range of literary engagements with the Victorian novel from the 1960s to the present, including feminist, queer, postmodern and postcolonial approaches and their theoretical contexts. Whether rewriting Victorian themes; reinterpreting well-known characters and authors; rediscovering Victorian narrative structures or recovering 'lost' nineteenth-century perspectives, the problems of proximity and remoteness can be seen to inform imaginative recuperation of the Victorians? own array of competing histories. This course will proceed from familiarity with key nineteenth-century texts and contexts to enable close analysis of prequels, sequels, offshoots and alternatives by authors such as Jean Rhys, Graham Swift, Sarah Waters, Peter Carey, Matthew Kneale, Lloyd Jones, James Wilson and Valerie Martin. With attentiveness to intertextuality, appropriation and adaptation we will work towards an understanding of the continued influence of Victorian developments of the novel genre in modern literature.

Further Information & Notes

This course is not available in 2013-14.

In light of Covid-19 this information is indicative and may be subject to change.

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

More Information about Week Numbers


Summative Assessments

1st Attempt: 3000 word essay (80%); Seminar Assessment (20%) Resit: For honours students only: candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit a new essay.

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Feedback

Detailed written comments on essay; detailed oral feedback on seminar participation (content and delivery).

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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