production
Skip to Content

LS403A: SOCIAL, ETHICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (2023-2024)

Last modified: 05 Oct 2023 08:46


Course Overview

The course aims to introduce legal, ethical, and social implications of international commercial relationships.

The course will cover the concept of global value chains and the drivers behind global value chains structures, such as globalization, development, and sustainable development.

It will then focus on the negative impacts that the production processes in global value chains have on individuals, communities, and the environment in, primarily, low-and middle-income countries. Examples include labour and working conditions, overexploitation of resources and pollution, project-related human rights impacts including forced labour and child labour.

Finally, the course will cover policy, regulatory, and litigation response to these challenges in their socio-economic, legal, and ethical contexts.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 4
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 25 credits (12.5 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Ms Nevena Jevremovic

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • One of Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4 or Programme Level 5
  • Law (LS)
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

Yes

One or more of these courses have a limited number of places. Priority access will be given to students for whom this course is compulsory. Please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions for more details on this process.


Course Description

Production networks account for around 80% of global trade. These networks – known as global value chains – encompass a range of actors in different locations and industries.

The technological development and political shifts of the last century allowed the global value chains to flourish. At the same time, the legal and socio-economic structures allow some actors in the global value chains to increase their profits and avoid accountability for the negative impacts of the production processes the individuals and communities of low- and middle-income countries. Examples include adverse social, human rights, and environmental impacts on, such as labour and working conditions, overexploitation of resources and pollution, project-related human rights impacts including forced labour and child labour.

Remedying power disbalances in global value chains is one of the most pressing challenges of modern times. Responses thus far include policy and regulatory measures on international, regional, and national levels, and a range of business and human rights litigation across jurisdictions. Still, question remains if such responses are effective in restoring the balance between various actors in global value chains, and in preventing, mitigating, and removing negative impacts of production processes.

Against this backdrop, the course will introduce the key concepts and drivers behind global value chains structures, critically analyse the policy and doctrinal responses, and evaluate their legal, ethical, and social implications. The course will cover indicative topics, some of which include:

  • Concept of global value chains
  • Drivers behind global value chains, such as globalization, development, and sustainable development
  • Responsible business conduct standards in international soft law instruments
  • Mandatory due diligence and modern slavery legislation in the UK and comparatively in EU and other jurisdictions such as USA and Australia
  • Business and human rights litigation against corporations in the UK and comparatively in other jurisdictions, such as Netherlands, Belgium, France, USA, Canada, and Asia-Pacific region
  • Model contract clauses for human rights, environment, and climate change in global value chains

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 1 Lecture during University week8
  • 1 Seminar during University weeks 9 - 10, 12, 14 - 16

More Information about Week Numbers


Details, including assessments, may be subject to change until 31 August 2023 for 1st half-session courses and 22 December 2023 for 2nd half-session courses.

Summative Assessments

Essay

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 50
Assessment Weeks 19,20 Feedback Weeks 25

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

The feedback will be provided in written form and in accordance with the Common Grading Scale. The feedback will be provided within three weeks as of submission, in accordance with the School’s and University’s policies.

Word Count 2500
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualUnderstandTo develop a critical understanding of the concept and drivers of global value chains as modern production networks
FactualRememberTo develop a critical understanding of ethical, legal, and social implications of policy and doctrinal responses to tackle negative impacts of production processes in global value chains.
ProceduralApplyTo apply the knowledge and concepts acquired in specific case scenarios, such as contract design and management in global value chains
ReflectionCreateTo communicate orally and in writing information, advice, and choices related to legal, socio-economic and ethical issues in global production networks effectively and persuasively.
ReflectionEvaluateTo evaluate the role of legislators, courts, and other stakeholders in tackling negative production impacts in global value chains

Essay

Assessment Type Summative Weighting 50
Assessment Weeks 13,14 Feedback Weeks 16,17

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

The feedback will be provided in written form and in accordance with the Common Grading Scale. The feedback will be provided within three weeks as of submission, in accordance with the School’s and University’s policies.

Word Count 2500
Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualUnderstandTo develop a critical understanding of the concept and drivers of global value chains as modern production networks
FactualRememberTo develop a critical understanding of ethical, legal, and social implications of policy and doctrinal responses to tackle negative impacts of production processes in global value chains.
ReflectionCreateTo communicate orally and in writing information, advice, and choices related to legal, socio-economic and ethical issues in global production networks effectively and persuasively.

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Resit Assessments

Resubmission of failed elements

Assessment Type Summative Weighting
Assessment Weeks Feedback Weeks

Look up Week Numbers

Feedback

If failed one essay: Resit in the same format as the failed assessment (2,500-word essay) with passing grade carried forward.

If failed both essays: 4,000-word essay (100%)

The feedback will be provided in written form and in accordance with the Common Grading Scale. The feedback will be provided within three weeks as of submission, in accordance with the School’s and University’s policies.

Learning Outcomes
Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
Sorry, we don't have this information available just now. Please check the course guide on MyAberdeen or with the Course Coordinator

Course Learning Outcomes

Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualUnderstandTo develop a critical understanding of the concept and drivers of global value chains as modern production networks
FactualRememberTo develop a critical understanding of ethical, legal, and social implications of policy and doctrinal responses to tackle negative impacts of production processes in global value chains.
ProceduralApplyTo apply the knowledge and concepts acquired in specific case scenarios, such as contract design and management in global value chains
ReflectionEvaluateTo evaluate the role of legislators, courts, and other stakeholders in tackling negative production impacts in global value chains
ReflectionCreateTo communicate orally and in writing information, advice, and choices related to legal, socio-economic and ethical issues in global production networks effectively and persuasively.

Compatibility Mode

We have detected that you are have compatibility mode enabled or are using an old version of Internet Explorer. You either need to switch off compatibility mode for this site or upgrade your browser.