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EL3506: READING THE VICTORIANS (2015-2016)

Last modified: 25 Mar 2016 11:35


Course Overview

Reading the Victorians reveals some surprising things about the nineteenth century, and about many elements of modern-day society. Queen Victoria's reign (1837-1901) brought industrialisation, urbanisation, scientific innovation, the growth of the British Empire and major political reform. This was also an age of artistic creativity, optimism and humour. Literature in many different forms was at the heart of these developments. This course explores how Victorian literature was both product of its age and agent of change, and examines the work of such writers as Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, Gaskell and Kipling.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Syrithe Pugh

Qualification Prerequisites

None.

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • English (EL) (Studied)
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Programme Level 3

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

Reading the Victorians reveals some surprising things about the nineteenth century, and about many elements of modern-day society. The years of Queen Victoria's reign (1837-1901) brought rapid change to Britain with industrialisation, urbanisation, scientific innovation, the growth of the British Empire and major political reform. However, this was also an age of artistic creativity, optimism and humour. Literature in many different forms was at the heart of these developments. More people were learning to read than ever before, and steam printing produced cheaper books, creating a mass-market of readers for the first time. This course explores how Victorian literature was both a product of its age and an agent of change, which spread evolving ideas about scientific theories, the changing role of women, and the function of art in society. It examines the work of writers such as Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Henry James and Rudyard Kipling.

Degree Programmes for which this Course is Prescribed

None.

Contact Teaching Time

76 hours

This is the total time spent in lectures, tutorials and other class teaching.

Teaching Breakdown


Assessment

1st attempt: Two essays, each 2500 words (each 40%); group project (10%); seminar assessment mark (10%) Re-sit: One 3,000 word essay (100%)

Formative Assessment

Formative assessment will be provided via written feedback on assessed work. Students will also be encouraged to discuss their progress with their tutor at office hours.

Feedback

Detailed written feedback on the essays. Detailed oral feedback on the presentations. Detailed written feedback on SAM.

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