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EL30XR: ROMANTICISM (2015-2016)

Last modified: 25 Mar 2016 11:35


Course Overview

The Romantic movement of the late 18th and early 19th century transformed received modes of writing, redefined the role of literature, and gave new prominence to ideas of originality, creativity and self-expression. This course traces the development of the Romantic aesthetic in the context of the social and political upheavals of the Age of Revolution. Analysing the work of major poets – Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron and Keats – as well as political writers, novelists and essayists such as Burke, Paine, Wollstonecraft, Austen, and De Quincey, the course examines the literature and thought of Romanticism across a range of genres.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Professor David Duff

Qualification Prerequisites

None.

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • English (EL) (Studied)
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Programme Level 3

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

The Romantic movement (1789-1832) was a turning point in literary history which transformed received modes of writing, redefined the role of literature, and gave new prominence to ideas of originality, imagination, creativity and self-expression. This course explores these developments. The first part centres on the work of Blake, Coleridge and Wordsworth, and studies the emergence of the revolutionary aesthetic of Romanticism in the context of the social and political upheavals of the 'Age of Revolution'. The second part focuses on the 'second-generation' Romantic poets Shelley, Byron and Keats, but also pays attention to outstanding prose writers of the period including Thomas De Quincey and the novelists Jane Austen and Walter Scott.

Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

More Information about Week Numbers


Summative Assessments

1st attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (50%); continuous assessment (50%) comprising 2,500 word essay (30%), group project (10%) and seminar work (10%).

1 two-hour examination (100%).

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Feedback

Detailed written feedback on the essay. Detailed written feedback on group project. Oral and/or written feedback on seminar work.

Course Learning Outcomes

None.

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