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EL30GK: MIND AND MONSTROSITY: REALISM AND THE GOTHIC IN THE LONG 19TH CENTURY (2017-2018)

Last modified: 12 Apr 2017 16:25


Course Overview

Exploring connections between Gothic monstrosity and psychological realism, this course investigates an exciting range of texts and contexts from the long nineteenth century. Focusing on novels from 1789-1914, with some attention to other genres and adaptations, we ask what it means to be human, and how cultural anxieties and scientific/technological developments have affected literature (and vice versa). From doubling to degeneration, madness to the metropolis, villain to vampire, empire to the threat of extinction, we examine the work of writers such as Mary Shelley, Dickens, Poe, Charlotte and Emily Brontë, Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, Bram Stoker and H.G. Wells.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Old Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Alexandra Lewis

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Either Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4
  • Either English (EL) or BSc Medical Science (Medical Humanities)
  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

Yes

One or more of these courses have a limited number of places. Priority access will be given to students for whom this course is compulsory. Please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions for more details on this process.


Course Description

Exploring connections between Gothic monstrosity and psychological realism, this course gives us the opportunity to investigate an exciting range of texts and contexts from the long nineteenth century. Focusing primarily on novels from the period 1789 to 1914, with some attention to other genres (such as the short story) as well as neo-Victorian and twenty-first-century responses to or adaptations of the nineteenth-century Gothic, we will investigate the ways that cultural anxieties and scientific and technological developments have historically affected literature (and vice versa). What does it mean to be human? How has this question been raised within the Gothic and realist traditions at different cultural moments? What sorts of monsters terrify or haunt us and how do they evolve to keep pace with the gaps in our certainties? From doubling to degeneration, madness to the metropolis, villain to vampire, empire to the threat of extinction, this course examines the work of writers such as Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte and Emily Brontë, Wilkie Collins, George Eliot, Bram Stoker and H.G. Wells.

Degree Programmes for which this Course is Prescribed

None.

Contact Teaching Time

30 hours

This is the total time spent in lectures, tutorials and other class teaching.

Teaching Breakdown


Assessment

1st Attempt

Continuous assessment (100%) comprising:

  • One 2500 word essay (80%)
  • Group presentation (10%)
  • Seminar Assessment Mark (weekly participation) (10%)
  • Formative assessment: one 2500 word close reading exercise

Resit

  • 2500-word essay (100%)

Formative Assessment

None.

Feedback

Verbal feedback will be given throughout seminar discussion.  Formative and summative assessment will be provided via oral and written feedback on assessed work. Students will also be encouraged to engage in peer feedback and to discuss their progress with their tutor .

 

 

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