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GEOLOGY AND PETROLEUM GEOLOGY

> Level 1
GL 1005
THE EARTH THROUGH GEOLOGICAL TIME
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M J Hole

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Practical sessionswill be available each week; individual students attend once a fortnight.

For 4,500 million years the Earth has been, and still is, a continually evolving Dynamic Planet. The record is held in the rocks and fossils of the present continental landmasses and ocean basins. To deduce the history of the planet geologists must apply a large range of scientific principles and disciplines. These disciplines encompass the biological,chemical and physical sciences. The course provides a basic understanding of how the structure and evolution of the planet are deduced and how this information can be used to discover and extract natural resources such as fossil fuels and ores.

20 one-hour lectures5 three- hourpractical sessions.

It is intended to include ahalf-day field course, depending on prevailing weather conditions.Other classes will be reduced pro-rata if fieldwork is possible.

1st Attempt: In-course assessment (50%); 90 minute examination (50%). In-course assessment will include class tests in mapping and palaeontology.

Resit: 1 two-hour examination including map and palaeontology practical questions (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

Three WebCT-delivered multiple choice question (MCQ) testswith on-line feedback at various times during term.

MCQ's have already been piloted and used for GL 1004 in session 2009/10. SCEFS and other comments suggest students find these extremely valuable, and it is intended to use these for the new course.

GL 1505
EARTH'S MATERIALS
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M J Hole

Pre-requisite(s): GL 1005

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Students with 'A' level or equivalent in geology may be exempt from this pre-requisite at the discretion of course-coordinator/Head of School.

An introduction to the petrogenesis of three major rock groups; igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The application of the polarizing microscope in the identification of the common rock-forming minerals. The relationship between plate tectonics and the petrogenesis of igneous amd metamorphic rocks, including types and styles of volcanic eruptions and hazards. The formation and fill of sedimentary basins and their importance in the accumulation of hydrocarbons.

10 one-hour lectures; 10 two-hour practical classes.

1 half-day fieldwork after the Easter break.

1st Attempt: 90 minute examination (50%); in-course assessment (50%). In-course assessment will include class tests in optical microscopy and mineral identification.

Resit: Examination (2 hours) including practical section (100%).

Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

WebCT-based multiple choice (MCQ)tests with on-line feedback at various time during term. Exercises with solutions during practical classes.

MCQ's have already been piloted for GL 1004 during 2009-2010. SCEFS and other comments suggest that students find these extremely valuable, and it is intended to use MCQ tests in this course.

 

> Level 2
GL 2014
STRATIGRAPHICAL PRINCIPLES
CREDIT POINTS 15

Course Co-ordinator: Dr M J Hole

Pre-requisite(s): GL 1005 and GL 1505

Co-requisite(s): None

Note(s): Students with 'A' level Geology or equivalent may be exempt from the GL 1005 prerequisite. Students who have taken and passed KL 107X or KL 157X or equivalent make take this course subject to prior permission of the course coordinator.

  • absolute dating - Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, U-Pb, K-Ar & Ar-Ar systematics and the treatment of raw data (mineral and whole-rock)

  • relative timing of geological events from geological maps

  • basic principles of facies analysis

  • case studies of integrated used of time, sequencing and interpretative stratigraphical tools based on published geological maps.
  • 2 two-hour sessions per week.

    1st Attempt: in-course assessment (60%) - lab work (geochronology calculations and report; map interpretation)
    (40%) examination - 1 hours.

    Resit: Original in-course assessment (60%); Examination (40%) - 1 hours.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Informal progress reports on lab work - interim marking of lab-based exercises.
    WebCT MCQ tests three times a term.

    Formative: Verbal report, WebCT
    Summative: written feedback normally within 2 weeks of original sumbmission.

    GL 2015
    PETROLOGY & MINERALOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S A Bowden

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 1005; GL 1505

    Co-requisite(s): None

    Note(s): Students with 'A' level Geology or equivalent may be exempt from the GL 1005 prerequisite. Students who have taken and passed KL 107X or KL 157X or equivalent may take this course subject to prior permission of the course coordinator.

    Chemical Composition of Earth as a planetary body.
    Composition and structure of the common rock-forming minerals.
    Introduction to phase equilibria; melting processes and magma production; crystallization and consolidation of magma. Solid-state reactions in rock materials; metamorphic reactions.
    Diagenesis & weathering.
    Processes and environments of chemical/biological sediment formation.

    2 one-hour lectures per week. 8 three-hour practical classes during 1/2 session.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%); in-course assessment (40%). In course assessment will be based on laboratory exercises.

    Resit: Examination (60%) plus original in-course assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Interim marking of laboratory-based exercises throughout term, with feedback every two weeks.

    Written summative feedback will be provided on laboratory exercises prior to the written examination.

    GL 2510
    INTRODUCTION TO FIELD GEOLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C P North

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 1005; GL 1505.

    Co-requisite(s): GL 2014, GL 2015, GL 2511

    Note(s): Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    Six days of fieldwork, in an area with a significant diversity of geological features.

    • Collecting accurate and precise structural data.

    • Logging of a sedimentary sequence and analysis of the palaeoenvironment.

    • Examination and recording of features of igneous and metamorphic rocks.

    • Recording data on a topographical map and in a notebook.

    • Instructed practical classes prior to the field course will include the background to sedimentology and the construction of sedimentary logs.

    Residential fieldcourse of six days duration. Introductory instructed practical classes, approximately 4 three-hours each.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

    Resit: Apply to course coordinator.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The majority of teaching is a small groups at outcrop. Feedback is therefore continuous and on-going throughout the course.

    A series of problem-based exercises will be set over the field course and these are marked and returned to students generally within 48 hours.

    Written summative feedback will be provided on daily field-based exercises.

    GL 2511
    GEOPHYSICS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Stephenson

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014, GL 2015

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    • Gravity and isostasy, satellites and geodesy, geomagnetism and palaeomagnetism, geoelectrics, heat flow; techniques of seismology, origin and form of waves, locating earthquakes and deducing their focal mechanisms.

    • Using active and passive seismic methods to deduce earth structure, principles for interpreting seismic reflection data.

    • Introduction to earth forces, stress and deformation of the solid earth.

    • Fluid dynamics, fluid flow, physical sedimentary and volcanic processes.

    • Origin of sedimentary structures.

    3 one-hour lectures per week. 4 three-hour practical sessions/surgeries throughout term.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (20%); two-hour examination (80%).

    Resit: Two-hour examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Worksheets from surgeries and practical sessions will provide a vehicle for formative assessment.

    Written and oral comments on worksheets during surgeries. Summative assessment at the end of term.

    GL 2512
    INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY FOR PETROLEUM ENGINEERS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Macdonald

    Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students who have completed Level 1 of a BEng or MEng programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None

    1. Introduction to the Earth as a Planet; the constitution and physical conditions of the subsurface

    2. An introduction mineral species and to the petrogenesis of three major rock groups; igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary

    3. The application of various techniques in the identification of the common rock-forming minerals and of rocks important in the petroleum industry

    4. The physical, chemical and mechanical properties of common sedimentary rocks. This section will focus on their reservoir and seal properties.

    5. Deformation of rocks; the formation of faults and folds and their signifiicance in the petroleum industry.

    12 x 1 hour lectures; 10 x 2 hour practical classes.

    1 half-day fieldwork after the Easter break.

    1 half-day visit to a local consulting company supporting the oil industry in Aberdeen.

    1st Attempt: 1 x 90 minute examination (50%) and in-course assessment (50%).

    Candidates must pass both elements of the assessment.

    In-course assessment will include class tests in rock and mineral identification.

    Resit: 100% examination (2 hours) including practical section.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    WebCT-based multiple choice (MCQ) tests with on-line feedback at various time during term. Exercises with solutions during practical classes.

    MCQ's were piloted for GL1004 during 2009-2010. SCEFS and other comments suggest that students find these extremely valuable, and it is intended to use MCQ tests in this course.

     

    > Level 3
    GL 3018
    PRINCIPLES OF PETROLEUM GEOLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr J E Neilson

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014; GL 2015; GL 2510; GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None

    • The origin of petroleum including fundamental processes of organic deposition, thermal maturation, migration of fluids.

    • Formation of the different types of traps for reservoired petroleum.li>
    • Conventional and Unconventional Hydrocarbons.li>
    • Techniques for remotely determining rock properties including wireline logging and geophysical (seismic, gravity and aeromagnetic) surveys.li>
    • Exploration strategies and the role of the geologist.

    12 three-hour sessions of lectures and practical sessions. Materials for additional private study including review sessions is provided.

    1st Attempt: 1 ninety minute written examination paper (75%); in-course assessment (25%).
    Resit: Failed elements of assessment by examination.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    In-course assessments are started during practical classes and completed in private study time. These are submitted during the period of the course on two occasions with written feedback.

    Feedback is given in writing on individual student's work, and group feedback is provided on MyAberdeen and during practical classes.

    GL 3026
    FIELD AND MAPPING TECHNIQUES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor A.J Hartley

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2511, GL2014, GL 2015, GL 2510.

    Co-requisite(s): Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Note(s): Note(s): Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    One week field excursion: The excursion concentrates on field techniques and data recording and interpretation. Experience will be gained in mapping and logging sedimentary sequences. Field recording and interpretation includes structural data, current directions, construction of cross-sections, reconstruction of palaeoenvironments and field palaeontology.

    Mapping classes: A series of follow-up pratical classes on the interpretation of geological maps.

    One week residential field course at the beginnning of first half-session level 3.

    5 three-hour mapping workshops.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).
    This will include assessments carried-out whilst on fieldwork and in practical classes.

    Resit: Repeat course.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The majority of teaching is a small groups at outcrop. Feedback is therefore continuous and on-going throughout the course. Field-based exercises are submitted after the days fieldwork, and marked and returned whilst the residential part of the course is still running.

    Field-based assessments are marked and returned during the field course, giving feedback on one exercise before completion of the next. Class-based exercises will be fed-back after each exercise.

    GL 3027
    STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY & TECTONICS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor R Butler

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2511, GL 2014, GL 2015, GL 2510. Only available to students at Level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    Interpretation of the surface geology of regions using geological maps and landforms using satellite and other remote sensing data. Cross-section construction. Introduction to the structural interpretation of seismic data. The main styles of deformation structures, faults, folds and distributed distortional strain and their analysis. 3D Structural analysis using stereographic projections. Simple kinematic approaches, relationship of deformation structures to tectonics and their importance for the structure of the crust and its sedimentary basins.

    20 three-hour lecture/practical sessions.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (30%); examination (two-hours) (70%).

    Resit: Two-hour examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Multiple choice questions will be set at intervals during the course to provide both summative and formative feedback.

    Laboratory-based exercises will be set and marked and retuurned to students withn two weeks of submission.

    GL 3028
    STRATIGRAPHY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M.J. Hole

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014; GL 2015; GL 2510; GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    The course would be based on lectures and associated practical material. Case studies would be drawn mainly from the North Sea and North Atlantic, using the same material where possible to illustrate different aspects of stratigraphic analysis. Case studies from other parts of the world would be used where appropriate (e.g. Tethyan carbonates to illustrate certain aspects of sequence stratigraphy). Detailed content as follows:

    • An overview of the stratigraphic principles outlined in first year (e.g. geologic time scale, stratigraphic sequences and unconformities).

    • Review of the main stratigraphically useful groups of macrofossils (e.g. graptolites, echinoids, ammonites etc.) and microfossils (e.g. archritarchs, foraminifera, spores, pollen etc.) excluding trace fossils which will be included in Level 3 sedimentology.

    • Geochronology (including how some systems may interact with the biological system) and introduce isotopic stratigraphy (carbon, oxygen and strontium) and correlation in barren sequences using chemical fingerprinting.

    • Introduction to sequence stratigraphy, the terms used, how analysis and facies distribution relates to absolute or relative SL variation and the major differences between clastic and carbonate systems.

    • Identifcation, description, correlation and documentation of stratigraphical sequences on local (relative to logging, geological mapping and map analysis), regional and global scales (e.g. correlation of major extinction events, SL changes, volcanic activity).

    2 hours lectures for 12 weeks and 3 hours practical per week for 10 weeks.

    1st Attempt: 1 2-hour written examination (50%) and in-courses assessment (50%).

    Resit: Examination (50%) and original in-course assessment (50%). carried- forward.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Assessment is completed by the end of week 5 and submitted electronically to MyAberdeen.

    Assessment above is read-back electronically to each student by the end of week 7. Any obviously misconceptions within the class as a whole can be addressed in later classes as general feedback.

    GL 3029
    PETROLEUM GEOLOGY AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERISATION
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor David Macdonald

    Pre-requisite(s): This programme is normally only open to students who have successfully completed the first two years of a petroleum Engineering programme (BEng or MEng). Other students may occasionally be admitted at the discretion of the Head of School.

    Co-requisite(s): None

    • Principles of petroleum geology, including unconventionals.

    • The petroleum system.

    • Exploration techniques, including reflection seismic acquisition and processing.

    • Petrophysics I.

    • Petrophysics II.

    • Geological input into drilling and completion.

    • The language of the log - understanding comp logs.

    • Formation evaluation I.

    • Formation evaluation II.

    • Reservoir architecture in lab and field.

    10 x three-hour sessions, one per week. These are mixed lectures/labs/tutorials.

    Two full days of field work, six hours work per day plus travel time.

    One three-hour revision tutorial.

    1st Attempt: Continuous assessment exercise on reservoir geology, either in the form of a poster or a PowerPoint presentation (30%).

    One two hour written examination (70%).

    Resit: 1 two hour written examination (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Class presentations assessed by peer assessment with instant fedback.

    In-field role-play exercise on development geology and well planning.

    Formative assessment: peer feedback (instant) and oral feedback from tutor (instant).

    Summative assessment by mark sheet dissecting performance under five headings: content, interpretation, discussion, conclusions and presentation (each worth 20%).

    GL 3508
    PROJECT/DISSERTATION
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M J Hole

    Pre-requisite(s): Only available to students registered for the Designated Degree in Geoscience, Geology, Geology-Petroleum Geology or Joint or Combined programmes with a core GL content.

    Note(s): This course is normally only available to students registered for a Designated Degree of Geoscience, Geology, Geology-Petroleum Geology or Joint or Combined programmes with a core GL content. This course cannot be taken with GL3512 Field Techniques 2 as part of a graduating curriculum.

    A dissertation not exceeding 5,000 words based upon an original geological investigation or a literature review.

    Or, where appropriate, the submission of a piece of independently executed fieldwork, in the form of a map and brief accompanying memoir, may be permitted at the discretion of the Course Coordinator.

    No formal teaching hours.

    1st Attempt: 100% in course assessment. A dissertation not exceeding 5,000 words based upon an original geological investigation or a literature review.

    Or, the submission of a piece of independently executed fieldwork, in the form of a map and brief accompanying memoir.

    Resit: Resubmission of previous report.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students will be allocated, or find a project advisor from amongst the Staff or Postgraduate Research Fellows who will guide them through the investigation.

    Individual meetings with project supervisor.

    GL 3519
    CURRENT ISSUES IN GEOSCIENCE
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor R Stephenson

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014, GL 2015, GL 2510, GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): none

    Attendance at departmental research seminars and workshops.Additional course-specific lecture/workshops developing ideas and concepts from seminar series. Final assessment will require the submission of a public friendly scientific narrative on an approved topic, and a presentation to peer-group on that topic.

    8 x 1 hour departmental research seminars, with follow-up 1 hour tutorials immediately after the seminars as required. At least 6 x 2 hour lectures/worshops on key topical issues in geoscience from departmental and outside speakers.

    1st Attempt: 100% by in-course assessment. Final assessment will require the submission of a public friendly scientific narrative on an approved topic, and presentation to peer-group on that topic.

    Resit: Re-submission of report.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Students will choose the topic which they wish to pursue for their final submission. An outline and work-flow for their investigation will be submitted at the end of week 5 of the course. This will be cristically assessed and feedback given.
    Students will be free to consult any staff on their topic at any time during the course.

    This will mostly be done via informal meetings and via 2-hour tutorials or small group workshops.

    GL 3520
    IGNEOUS & METAMORPHIC PETROLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Healy

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014; GL 2015; GL 2510; GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None

    • Petrogenesis of igneous rocks of Island arcs and Cordillera.

    • Petrogenesis of oceanic within plate magmas.

    • Petrogenesis of continental flood basalts and relationship to continental break-up.

    • Blueschists and eclogites (high pressure-low temperature) metamorphism associated with subduction.

    • Granulites and granites (high temperature-low pressure) metamorphism associated with crustal thickening.

    2 one hour lectures per week; one practical session per week including computing classes.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment 50% - four equally weighted practical assessments
    Examination 50%.

    Resit: 50% original in-course assessment; 50% examination.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    In-course multiple choice tests will give instant feedback.
    Practical exercises will be submitted to MyAberdeen Electronically.

    Feedback will be made electronically through MyAberdeen.

    GL 3521
    SEDIMENTOLOGY
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C P North

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014; GL 2015; GL 2510; GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    The course will take a problem-led approach emphasising concepts and techniques in preference to exhaustive knowledge.

    • Overview and synthesis of sedimentology material covered in previous courses.

    • Objectives, methods and procedures for sedimentary rock description and recording.
    • Review of the general characteristics and processes of modern-day sedimentary environments.

    • Introduction to trace fossil analysis and how ichnology aids environmental interpretation.

    • Autogenic and allogenic controls on sediment preservation and accumulation, with an introduction to sequence stratigraphy.

    • Practice at interpreting sedimentary logs, describing a core, using petrography to aid environmental analysis.

    2 x one-hour lectures per week.
    1 x three-hour practical or guided self-directed learning session per week.
    Additional tutorials as required.

    1st Attempt: 1 two-hour written examination (60%) plus in-course assessment (40%) based on practical exercises (must achieve at least CAS 9 for all in-course assessments to pass the module overall).

    Resit: 1 two-hour written examination (60%) plus in-course assessment carried forward from first attempt (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Core-logging exercise and production of a sedimentary facies model is carried out over the course of the half-session, and this is marked in interim marking as well as a final summative mark.

    Individual feedback on exercises during the period of the course. class feedback on key issues.

    GL 3525
    FIELD AND MAPPING TECHNIQUES 2
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Healy

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 2014, GL 2015, GL 2510, GL 2511. Only available to students at level 3 of a Geoscience School Degree Programme.

    Note(s): Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Coordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    The course comprises
    1) background laboratory classes prior to embarking on field-based study.
    2) 10 days of field work undertaken during second half-session. It consists of 6 days of advanced field observation, mapping, data recording and analysis and 4 days analysis of the structural and petrological characteristics of Caledonian granitoids and their country rock hosts. Maps, records of field observations, field syntheses and interpretations are produced and developed during the course.

    6 x 3 hour preparatory laboratories.

    Residential field course of 12 days duration.

    1st Attempt: 100% by in-course assessment (most assessment will be carried-out whilst on fieldwork).

    Resit: Repeat course.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The majority of teaching is a small groups at outcrop. Feedback is therefore continuous and on-going throughout the course. Field-based exercises are submitted after the days fieldwork, and marked and returned whilst the residential part of the course is still running.

    Laboratory exercises will be carried out and feedback given as soon as is practicable.
    Field-based assessments are marked and returned during the fieldcourse, giving feedback on one exercise before completion of the next. Class-based exercises will be fed-back after each exercise.

     

    > Level 4

    PLEASE NOTE: Resit: (for Honours students only): Candidates achieving a CAS mark of 6-8 may be awarded compensatory level 1 credit. Candidates achieving a CAS mark of less than 6 will be required to submit themselves for re-assessment and should contact the Course Co-ordinator for further details.

    GL 4022
    LIFE, THE UNIVERSE AND HYDROCARBONS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Parnell

    Pre-requisite(s): Only for Hon students in Geology & Petroleum Geology

    1. Reading and critiquing Thomas Gold's 2001 book "The Deep Hot Biosphere: The Myth of Fossil Fuels".

    2. Investigation of one aspect that student believes Gold has misunderstood OR that oil/gas industry has overlooked.

    3. Supported by seminar-format explanation of some of the issues involved, particularly those pertinent to hydrocarbon formation/distribution (including deep permeability, biomarkers, role of microbes).

    4. Practical study of non-conventional occurrences of hydrocarbons.

    5. Survey of class beliefs before/after reading the book.

    6 one-hour tutorials (to be arranged)
    2 three-hour practicals

    1st Attempt: Continous assessment (100%).

    GL 4023
    GEOLOGICAL MAPPING PROJECT
    CREDIT POINTS 45

    Course Co-ordinator: Prof R Butler

    Pre-requisite(s): Only available to level 4 Honours Geology-Petroleum Geology and Geoscience students.

    This is an independent project and has no specific lecture or practical syllabus. The course aims to make students integrate all their geological knowledge and skills gained on previous courses and challenges them to be more aware of their own academic and self management skills. The course is designed to encourage students to plan and execute a small research project and, whilst the initial choice of project is subject to staff scrutiny (for reasons of safety and geological suitability), the subsequent input and guidance from staff advisers is controlled by student request.

    3 one-day field courses in the Aberdeen area after the May examination diet. 35 days of individual fieldwork in an area approved by supervisor.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

    GL 4027
    GEOLOGICAL FIELD PROJECT
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor R Butler

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology, Geosciences, Geology, Geography-Geosciences & Geology-Physics students.

    Co-requisite(s): GL 4521 Geological Research Project.

    Note(s): Cannot be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GL 4023 Geological Mapping Project.

    This is an independent project and has no specific lecture or practical syllabus. The course aims to make students integrate all their geological knowledge and skills gained on previous courses and challenges them to be more aware of their own academic and self management skills.

    The course is designed to encourage students to plan and execute a small research project and, whilst the initial choice of project is subject to staff scrutiny (for reasons of safety and geological suitability), the subsequent input and guidance from staff advisers is controlled by student request.

    Each student will have at least 1 day of field supervision from a member of staff at a mutually agreed time, but approximately half-way through their field days.

    1st Attempt: Assessment of field note books, field maps, logs etc.; assessment of map "clean copy" (60%); Poster & oral presentation (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Guidance will be given in the field and at tutorials by mutual agreement between staff and students.

    Tutorials and field days will allow formative feedback.

    GL 4028
    PETROLEUM GEOLOGY: GEOCHEMSITRY AND GEOFLUIDS
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor J Parnell

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology, MGeol, Geography-Geoscience & Geology-Physics students.

    Note(s): This course may not be taken as part of a graduating curriculum with GL 45XX Geology Field Course.

    Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    1. Thermal history techniques, including fission track analysis, fluid inclusion analysis, biomarker analysis.

    2. Diagenesis in sedimentary basins, and consequences for exploration.

    3. Indicators of palaeogeography, palaeoenvironments, provenance, and the use of space-time diagrams.

    4. Application of biostratigraphic techniques in basin exploration.

    5. Application of petroleum geochemistry in basin exploration.

    6. Gas hydrates (clathrates): global distribution, stability; occurrence in geological history.

    7. Natural gas: origins, analysis of gases to determine origin; hydrogen springs.

    8. Shale gas/coal bed methane: Potential distribution of shale gas; prediction and detection of shale gas; coal bed methane.

    9. Hydrocarbons in basement rocks: Occurrence, commercial prospects; possibility of abiogenic hydrocarbons.

    10. Tar sands, oil shale and massive bitumen: Global distribution of tar sands, their formation and prospectivity; massive bitumen deposits; oil shales.

    6 one-hour lectures
    18 three-hour seminar-practical packages
    3 days field course, equivalent to 24 hours classes (residential).

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (60%); examination (40%).

    Resit: Examination (40%) and resubmission of failed elements of in-course assessment.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Practical and seminar parts of course package will allow for oral formative feedback.

    Field course will be taught in small groups (2 staff and about 25 students) giving good opportunity for feedback.

    Return of a series of short assessments run throughout the half-session, with feedback sheets for each. Resource prediction Report and Data interpretation report will be returned with summative comments before the end of the course.

    GL 4029
    GEOLOGICAL SYNTHESIS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr I Alsop

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology, Geosciences, Geology, Geography-Geosciences & Geology-Physics students.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    Note(s): Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    A series of one-day field exercises based around the Aberdeen area.

    All field-based.

    1st Attempt: In course assessment (70%); examination (30%).

    One-day courses will each have a report associated with them.

    The (30%) by examination is a General Paper in the May Examination diet.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Field-based teaching is largely problem-based, and much of the formative assessment is done in the field.

    Each of the one-day field courses will have an exercise associated with it.

    For the one-day field courses, each report will be marked and returned to the students prior to the next field day.

    GL 4516
    FIELD INTERPRETATION
    CREDIT POINTS 12.5

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C M Rice

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 3017 Field Techniques 1.

    Note(s): This course is only for students taking a joint degree. Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    This field based course covers synthesis and geological modelling and comprises (1) an 8 day field course in North West Scotland or Northern England and (2) a short report and oral presentation on an assigned regional study.

    Field courses.

    Assessment: Based on field work reports (100%).

    GL 4523
    GIS & DIGITAL DATA ANALYSIS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr C E Bond

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology, Geosciences, Geology, Geography-Geosciences & Geology-Physics students.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    • Working with digital geological data.

    • Loading GIS datasets.

    • Collecting digital geological data.

    • Analysis of uncertainties in data collection and interpretation.

    • 3D datasets, using visualisation to understand 3D geometries, and
      using software tools to assess the validity of models.

    6 one-hour lectures and 12 three-hour practicals; with associated directed learning.

    1st Attempt: Mid session group practical exercise and poster creation (30%); Individual work project (70%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Feedback will be given after the mid-session group work.

    The students will mark each others poster- based on a pro-forma, providing the students with peer-review of their own work.

    The teaching staff will complete the same forms and provide further feedback verbally to the groups.
    During the individual project work there will be drop-in sessions for students to get feedback on their work.

    GL 4525
    INTERPRETING THE SUBSURFACE
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr I Alsop

    Pre-requisite(s): GL 4024

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    Note(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology, Geosciences, Geology, Geography-Geosciences & Geology-Physics students.

    • Basics of reflection seismology.

    • Signal theory and propagation of waves.

    • Reflection seismic acquisition.

    • Seismic processing fundamentals and digital filtering.

    • Seismic interpretation for structures.

    • Reservoir aspects of seismic interpretation.

    • Seismic stratigraphy.

    • Fundamentals of gravity and magnetic surveys.

    15 three-hour lecture-seminar-practical packages, plus self-directed learning and private study.

    1st Attempt: Examination (60%); In-course assessment (40%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Practical and seminar parts of course package will allow for oral formative feedback.

    Summative assessment will be provided on in-course assessment using pro-forma.

    GL 4527
    GEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PROJECT
    CREDIT POINTS 30

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr S.A. Bowden

    Pre-requisite(s): Entry onto the Honours Programme in Geology-Physics or Physics with Geology or any other combined or Joint honours course which includes core GL courses.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    This course is an independent laboratory based investigation with no specific syllabus of lecture or practical classes. The course requires students to integrate previous knowledge and skills gained during geological course-work in to a coherent self-learning package chosen to satisfy the interests of individual students. In essence, it is the culmination of the degree course allowing the student to carry out self-directed research.

    No formal teaching.

    1st Attempt:
    1) SUBMISSION OF AN APPLICATION: Outline of the intended project.(10%)
    2) WRITTEN REPORT: (80%) in the form of a "Short" to the Journal of the Geological Society of London.
    3) SEMINAR: Peer assessed (cross subject) and by a panel of staff members. (10%)

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The application and outline must be submitted prior to commencing project work.
    Feedback is given on the practicailities and structure of the programme of work.
    The student must keep an accurate laboratory notebook documenting the time spent and outcomes of their investigations.

    On an individual basis via project supervisor.
    "Random Inspection" of laboratory notebook.

    GL 4528
    GEOLOGY FIELD COURSE
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor D Jolley

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology, Archaeology-Geoscience, Geography-Geoscience, Geology-Physics & MGeol.

    Note(s): This course cannot be taken with GL 40XX Petroleum Geology: Geochemistry and Geofluids.

    Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    A residential field class of up to 6 days tied to the interpretation of supporting geological data and previously published work, followed by presentations through combinations of oral, poster and written report.

    Residential course, plus 4 three-hour preparation classes during week 30-36.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Assessments will be set on an individual day of field work, and returned, marked before the end of the course.

    By return of assessment sheets accompanying each individual assessment exercise.

    GL 4529
    SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE DIGITAL IMAGING
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr D Iacopini

    Pre-requisite(s): Offer of continuation to level 4 Honours programme in Geology-Petroleum Geology or Geology-Physics

    Basics of reflection seismology.
    Signal theory and propagation of waves.
    Reflection seismic acquisition.
    Seismic processing funamentals and digital filtering.
    Seismic interpretation for structures.
    Reservoir aspects of seismic interpretation.
    Seismic stratigraphy.
    Fundamentals of gravity and magnetic surveys.
    Loading GIS datasets.
    Collecting digital geological data.
    Analysis of uncertainties in data collection and interpretation.
    3D datasets, using visualisation to understand 3D geometries, and

    using software tools to assess the validity of models.

    Lectures and computing sessions using workstations.
    The course will use industry-standard licenced software packages provided by Industry Partners.

    1st Attempt: Examination 50%: In-course assessment 50%


    Resit: Not applicable

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    The students will mark each others' poster- based on a pro-forma, providing the students with peer-review of their own work.
    The teaching staff will complete the same forms and provide further feedback verbally to the groups.
    During the individual project work there will be drop-in sessions for students to get feedback on their work.

    During the individual project work there will be drop-in sessions for students to get feedback on their work.

     

    > Level 5
    GL 5008
    ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES IN THE EARTH SCIENCES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr R Stephenson

    Pre-requisite(s): Acceptance for progression to the degree of Master of Geology.

    A Quantitative modelling in Geology

    • Background concepts and physical principles underlying quantitative modelling techniques as used in geological applications

    • Non-specialist overview of the mathematical expression of these physical principles

    • Examination of the applications of quantitative modelling techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, to fluid flow, structural geology, geodynamics problems

    Laboratory techniques.
    • Principles of X-ray analysis (XRD, XRF, electron microprobe)

    • Principles of ICP and ICP-MS

    • Principles of GC and GC-MS

    • Principles of the Scanning electron microscope

    • Relative costs of techniques.

    2 one-hour lecture/tutorial per week; 2 one-hour practical per week.

    1st Attempt: In-course assessment (100%). This will include mathematical problems for the quantiative modelling content and practical analytical problems for the Laboratory techniques content.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Most of the mathematical problems will be in class and solutions will be summarized at the end of that class.

    Feedback on the analytical content of the course will be by formal marking of assignments with feedback sheets.

    GL 5009
    GEOLOGICAL RESEARCH SKILLS
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Dr M J Hole

    Pre-requisite(s): Acceptance for progression to the degree of Master of Geology.

    Co-requisite(s): None.

    • Construction of scientific argument, identifying and formulating hypotheses.

    • The nature and uncertainties in data and interpretation.

    • Design of workflows.

    • Critical interrogation of published material.

    • Synthesis of previous research

    • Presentation of science to peer-groups through writing, poster, oral and web-based media.

    • Presentation of science to non-technical audiences through various media.

    1 three-hour contact sessions
    Directed project-work, preparing materials. This will include seminars, written material, poster presentations and the production of web-based materials.

    1st Attempt: Through submission of a portfolio of practical work (scientific writing, poster, powerpoint/oral and digital materials at the end of the course.

    Resubmission of portfolio.

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    A combination of group-based peer-review sessions moderated by the course team, with feedback given after each major task.

    A combination of group-based peer-review sessions moderated by the course team, with feedback given after each major task.

    GL 5506
    ADVANCED FIELD TECHNIQUES
    CREDIT POINTS 15

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor R W H Butler

    Pre-requisite(s): Acceptance for progression to the degree of Master of Geology.

    Note(s): Fieldwork is a compulsory part of this course. Fieldwork may involve crossing rough terrain, including steep gradients, rocky areas and along cliffs, and may take place during inclement weather. Any student with concerns about this, who feels adjustments or additional support may be required, should contact the University's Disability Adviser or the Department Disability Co-ordinator as early as possible. The Department is committed to making reasonable adjustments to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree programme.

    A residential field class of up to 10 days tied to the interpretation of supporting geophysical and remote-sensing data and previously published work, followed by presentations through combinations of oral, poster and written report.

    Residential course.

    1st Attempt: Presentations (Individual (60% - Group 40%)

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Formative assessment will be on-going in the field.

    Oral feedback, both from peers and lecturers will be an integral part of the presentations

    GL 5507
    RESEARCH PROJECT
    CREDIT POINTS 60

    Course Co-ordinator: Professor R W H Butler

    Pre-requisite(s): Acceptance for progression to the degree of Master of Geology.

    The project content will be decided in collaboration with a named supervisor within the Department of Geology & Petroleum Geology. The topic chosen will be consistent with the options taken at level 4.

    Supervisory meetings, at least once a week during the project period.

    1st Attempt: Submission of 5,000 word technical report (70%); Oral Presentation (10%); Submission of a 'popular' science article (20%).

    Formative Assessment and Feedback Information

    Supervisory meetings will take place weekly during the period of the project.

    Approximately half-way through the project, an interim report showing progress to date will be submitted.

    Via supervisory meetings. At least one supervisory meeting per week will take place at which the student will be expected to attend.