Bestiary The Aberdeen Bestiary

Introduction History Bestiary Codicology Bibliography

Folio 18r Translation and Transcription

Previous - Commentary - Next

full folio image of f18r
    Folio 18r Translation

never turns towards the correction of penitence. is that they leap so high that they seem to have wings, going further than they would by running. They never attack men, however. In winter, they grow long hair; in summer, they are hairless. The Ethiopians call them theas.

Of the nature of dogs

The Latin name for the dog, canis, seems to have a Greek origin. For in Greek it is called cenos, although some think that it is called after the musical sound, canor, of its barking, because when it howls, it is also said to sing, canere. No creature is more intelligent than the dog, for dogs have more understanding than other animals; they alone recognise their names and love their masters. There are many kinds of dogs: some track down the wild beasts of the forests to catch them; others by their vigilance guard flocks of sheep from the attacks of wolves; others as watch-dogs in the home guard the property of their masters lest it be stolen by thieves at night and sacrifice their lives for their master; they willingly go after game with their master; they guard his body even when he is dead and do not leave it. Finally, their nature is that they cannot exist without man.

Transcription

est quod insaliendo, ita visus habent alitis, ut magis profici\ciant cursui quam meatu. Homines tamen nunquam impetunt. Bru\ma comati sunt. Estate nudi. Ethiopes eos vocant theas.

De \ natura canum

\ Canis nomen Latinum \Grecam ethimologiam \habere videtur. Greco \enim cenos dicitur, licet \quidem a canore latra\tus appellatum existi\ment, eo quod insonat \unde et canere dicitur. Ni\chil sagatius canibus plus \enim sensus ceteris a\nimalibus habent, nam soli sua nomina cognoscunt, do\minos suos diligunt. Canum sunt plurima genera, alii ad \capiendum investigant feras silvarum, alii ab infesta\tionibus luporum, vigilando greges custodiunt ovium,\alii custodes domorum, substantiam dominorum suorum custodiunt \ne forte rapiatur, in nocte a latronibus et pro dominos \suos se morti obiciunt, voluntarie ad predam cum \domino currunt, corpus domini sui etiam mortu\um custodiunt, et non linqunt. Quorum post\tremo nature est, extra hominem esse non posse. \
   Translation

never turns towards the correction of penitence. is that they leap so high that they seem to have wings, going further than they would by running. They never attack men, however. In winter, they grow long hair; in summer, they are hairless. The Ethiopians call them theas.

Of the nature of dogs

The Latin name for the dog, canis, seems to have a Greek origin. For in Greek it is called cenos, although some think that it is called after the musical sound, canor, of its barking, because when it howls, it is also said to sing, canere. No creature is more intelligent than the dog, for dogs have more understanding than other animals; they alone recognise their names and love their masters. There are many kinds of dogs: some track down the wild beasts of the forests to catch them; others by their vigilance guard flocks of sheep from the attacks of wolves; others as watch-dogs in the home guard the property of their masters lest it be stolen by thieves at night and sacrifice their lives for their master; they willingly go after game with their master; they guard his body even when he is dead and do not leave it. Finally, their nature is that they cannot exist without man

 

All images Copyright 1995
© Aberdeen University Library

 

 

Translation & Transcription Copyright 1995
© Colin McLaren & Aberdeen University Library


Main - Introduction - History - Bestiary - Search - Copyright - Codicology - Bibliography
Historic Collections - University of Aberdeen - King's College - Aberdeen - AB24 3SW
Michael Arnott
m.arnott@aberdeen.ac.uk

University of Aberdeen