The Aberdeen Bestiary

Folio 18v - Dogs, continued


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Commentary, Translation and Transcription

These sections are located below the image on each page, scroll down page and click on the tabs to view them. It is also possible to view the translation alongside the image by clicking the translation icon in the toolbar

It is not part of the project to provide a definitive edition of the text of the Bestiary, but to help readers by providing a transcription and translation of the text. Currently the following editorial conventions obtain:

Text

  1. The original capitalisation is retained, but capitals have been added for personal and place names, excluding deus and diabolus.
  2. The original punctuation, including a point and inverted semi-colon (both serving as commas), and a point (serving as a full stop), is represented by comma, full stop and question-mark; a colon has been inserted before quotations.
  3. Suggested readings are in [ ].
  4. Variants from other Bestiary texts (eg Ashmole 1511 and Patrologia Latina 176) are added where they indicate a corruption, elucidate a meaning and replace excised text. They are represented as [A: PL:]

Translation

  1. Direct quotations from the Bible, where identified, are cited from the Authorised Version in ( ).
  2. Paraphrased quotations are identified where possible and indicated as: (see Job, 18:22).
  3. Suggested translations of corrupt words are in [ ].
  4. Capitalisation is sparing; additional punctuation has been used where necessary to give the sense. Paragraphs have been created to break up the text.
Also of the nature of dogs We read that dogs have such great love for their masters, as when King Garamentes was caught by his enemies and taken into captivity, two hundred dogs went in formation through enemy lines and led him back from exile, fighting off those who resisted them. When Jason [Licio] was killed, his dog rejected food and died of starvation. The dog of King Lysimachus threw itself in the flame when its master's funeral pyre was lit and was consumed by fire along with him. When Apius and Junius Pictinius were consuls, a dog that could not be driven away from its master, who had been condemned, accompanied him to prison; when, soon afterwards, he was executed, it followed him, howling. When the people of Rome, out of pity, caused it to be fed, it carried the food to its dead master's mouth. Finally, when its master's corpse was thrown into the Tiber, the dog swam to it and tried to keep it from sinking. When a dog picks up the track of a hare or a deer and comes to a place where the trail divides or to a junction splitting into several directions, it goes to the beginning of each path and silently reasons with itself, as if by syllogism, on the basis of its keen sense of smell. 'Either the animal went off in this direction,' it says,'or that, or certainly it took this turning.’

Text

Dogs of King Garamentes. Many stories are told of dogs' loyalty to their masters.

Illustration

King Garamantes is captured by his enemies and rescued by his dogs.

Comment

On this page there is pricking for 29 lines with two additional lines added at the bottom by the scribe. The upper image is damaged by the pricking for pouncing on f.18r. Initial indicator 'l' in left margin. Initial type 2. After this page a leaf is missing which probably showed the dog detecting a murderer, the story told on f.19r. In Ashmole 1511, f.26r and f.26v, there are two full page illustrations of this subject, each story divided into three panels.

Transcription

Item de natura canum.\ Legitur in \tantum \suos diligere \dominos, ut \Garamantem \regemab ini\micis captum \ac in custodia \mancipatum, ducenti canes \agminefacto per medias aci\es inimicorum \ab exilio redu\xerunt prelian\tesadversus \resistentes. Ja\sone licio inter\fecto canis ipsius aspernatuscibum inedia obiit. Lisimachi\ regis canis, flamme se iniecit, accensorogo domini sui et pa\riter igni absumptus est. Apio Junio Pictinioconsulibus damp\natum dominum canis cum ambigi [PL, abigi] non possetcomitatus in carcerem,\mox percussum ululatu prosecutus est. Cumqueex miseratione populi Roma\ni potestas ei fieret cibi, ad os defunctiescam tulit. \Ultimo\ idem deiectum in Tyberum cadaver, adnatanssustentare conatus. \Cani vero ubi vestigium leporis cervive reppererit, atque ad diverti\culumsemite venerit, et quoddam viarum compitum, quod partes\ in plurimasscinditur, obiciens [obiens; PL, ambiens] singularum semitarum exordia\tacitus secum ipse pertractat, velud sillogisticam vocem, saga\citatemcolligendi odoris emittens. Aut in hanc partem, inquid\ deflexitaut in illam, aut certe in hunc se anfractum contulit.\

Translation

Also of the nature of dogs We read that dogs have such great love for their masters, as when King Garamentes was caught by his enemies and taken into captivity, two hundred dogs went in formation through enemy lines and led him back from exile, fighting off those who resisted them. When Jason [Licio] was killed, his dog rejected food and died of starvation. The dog of King Lysimachus threw itself in the flame when its master's funeral pyre was lit and was consumed by fire along with him. When Apius and Junius Pictinius were consuls, a dog that could not be driven away from its master, who had been condemned, accompanied him to prison; when, soon afterwards, he was executed, it followed him, howling. When the people of Rome, out of pity, caused it to be fed, it carried the food to its dead master's mouth. Finally, when its master's corpse was thrown into the Tiber, the dog swam to it and tried to keep it from sinking. When a dog picks up the track of a hare or a deer and comes to a place where the trail divides or to a junction splitting into several directions, it goes to the beginning of each path and silently reasons with itself, as if by syllogism, on the basis of its keen sense of smell. 'Either the animal went off in this direction,' it says,'or that, or certainly it took this turning.’
  • Commentary

    Text

    Dogs of King Garamentes. Many stories are told of dogs' loyalty to their masters.

    Illustration

    King Garamantes is captured by his enemies and rescued by his dogs.

    Comment

    On this page there is pricking for 29 lines with two additional lines added at the bottom by the scribe. The upper image is damaged by the pricking for pouncing on f.18r. Initial indicator 'l' in left margin. Initial type 2. After this page a leaf is missing which probably showed the dog detecting a murderer, the story told on f.19r. In Ashmole 1511, f.26r and f.26v, there are two full page illustrations of this subject, each story divided into three panels.

  • Translation
    Also of the nature of dogs We read that dogs have such great love for their masters, as when King Garamentes was caught by his enemies and taken into captivity, two hundred dogs went in formation through enemy lines and led him back from exile, fighting off those who resisted them. When Jason [Licio] was killed, his dog rejected food and died of starvation. The dog of King Lysimachus threw itself in the flame when its master's funeral pyre was lit and was consumed by fire along with him. When Apius and Junius Pictinius were consuls, a dog that could not be driven away from its master, who had been condemned, accompanied him to prison; when, soon afterwards, he was executed, it followed him, howling. When the people of Rome, out of pity, caused it to be fed, it carried the food to its dead master's mouth. Finally, when its master's corpse was thrown into the Tiber, the dog swam to it and tried to keep it from sinking. When a dog picks up the track of a hare or a deer and comes to a place where the trail divides or to a junction splitting into several directions, it goes to the beginning of each path and silently reasons with itself, as if by syllogism, on the basis of its keen sense of smell. 'Either the animal went off in this direction,' it says,'or that, or certainly it took this turning.’
  • Transcription
    Item de natura canum.\ Legitur in \tantum \suos diligere \dominos, ut \Garamantem \regemab ini\micis captum \ac in custodia \mancipatum, ducenti canes \agminefacto per medias aci\es inimicorum \ab exilio redu\xerunt prelian\tesadversus \resistentes. Ja\sone licio inter\fecto canis ipsius aspernatuscibum inedia obiit. Lisimachi\ regis canis, flamme se iniecit, accensorogo domini sui et pa\riter igni absumptus est. Apio Junio Pictinioconsulibus damp\natum dominum canis cum ambigi [PL, abigi] non possetcomitatus in carcerem,\mox percussum ululatu prosecutus est. Cumqueex miseratione populi Roma\ni potestas ei fieret cibi, ad os defunctiescam tulit. \Ultimo\ idem deiectum in Tyberum cadaver, adnatanssustentare conatus. \Cani vero ubi vestigium leporis cervive reppererit, atque ad diverti\culumsemite venerit, et quoddam viarum compitum, quod partes\ in plurimasscinditur, obiciens [obiens; PL, ambiens] singularum semitarum exordia\tacitus secum ipse pertractat, velud sillogisticam vocem, saga\citatemcolligendi odoris emittens. Aut in hanc partem, inquid\ deflexitaut in illam, aut certe in hunc se anfractum contulit.\
Folio 18v - Dogs, continued | The Aberdeen Bestiary | The University of Aberdeen