The Aberdeen Bestiary

Folio 57v - the caladrius, continued. De coturnice ; Of the quail


Translation Open Book View Download image for personal, teaching or research purposes Help Copyright

Help

To explore the image, simply click the image to zoom, double-click to zoom out, or click-drag to pan. You can also zoom in and out using the mouse scroll wheel.

Shortcuts

(Alt is Option on Macintosh)

  • Alt-click-drag to create a zoom-rectangle
  • Alt-click / Alt-double-click to zoom fully in / out
  • Alt-click-Reset button to return to the prior view

The thumbnail view in the top left can also be clicked or click-dragged to pan.

Keyboard shortcuts:

  • a to zoom in
  • z to zoom out
  • Arrow keys pan arround the image
  • Escape resets initial view or exits fullscreen

Toolbar buttons

Use the Toolbar for exact navigation - if using a mouse, hold it over any button to see a helpful tip.


Zoom out

Zoom in

Pan left

Pan right

Pan up

Pan down

Reset Image

Full screen view

View translation alongside image

View double page - bi folio

Download image for personal, research or teaching purposes

Help

Commentary, Translation and Transcription

These sections are located below the image on each page, scroll down page and click on the tabs to view them. It is also possible to view the translation alongside the image by clicking the translation icon in the toolbar

It is not part of the project to provide a definitive edition of the text of the Bestiary, but to help readers by providing a transcription and translation of the text. Currently the following editorial conventions obtain:

Text

  1. The original capitalisation is retained, but capitals have been added for personal and place names, excluding deus and diabolus.
  2. The original punctuation, including a point and inverted semi-colon (both serving as commas), and a point (serving as a full stop), is represented by comma, full stop and question-mark; a colon has been inserted before quotations.
  3. Suggested readings are in [ ].
  4. Variants from other Bestiary texts (eg Ashmole 1511 and Patrologia Latina 176) are added where they indicate a corruption, elucidate a meaning and replace excised text. They are represented as [A: PL:]

Translation

  1. Direct quotations from the Bible, where identified, are cited from the Authorised Version in ( ).
  2. Paraphrased quotations are identified where possible and indicated as: (see Job, 18:22).
  3. Suggested translations of corrupt words are in [ ].
  4. Capitalisation is sparing; additional punctuation has been used where necessary to give the sense. Paragraphs have been created to break up the text.
because the lion is king of the beasts; the eagle, king of the birds. Of the quail Quails are so called from their call; the Greeks call them ortigie because they were first seen on the island of Ortigia. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The leader of the flock is called ortigometra, 'the quail-mother'. The hawk, seeing the quail-mother approaching land, seizes it; because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader from another species, through whom they guard against this early danger. Their favorite food is the seed of poisonous plants. For this reason, the ancients forbade them to be eaten; for alone among living things, the quail suffers, like man, from the falling sickness. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The heat of summer is the warmth of love. The cold of winter is the temptation of the lethargic mind. From love of his neighbour, therefore, the righteous man crosses the sea of this world to love of God, that he mat stay forever in a warm land, burning continually with the heat of love within, in order to avoid the cold of winter, namely, the storms and winds of unexpected temptation. The leader of the flock is called the quail-mother. The hawk, seeing it approaching land, seizes it. The land represents earthly longings; the sea, the dangers of the world. The hawk, lying in wait, is the Devil, who tempts us by suggestion. Seeing the quail-mother approaching land, therefore, the hawk seizes it, as the Devil drags off with him those who seek earthly things. Let the churchman, therefore, who heads his flock, take careful heed of his purpose in seeking earthly things, whether he acquires them for his own use or seeks them to meet the need of his brothers, lest the hawk, that is, the Devil, should seize him, if he has neglected the things of the spirit and has not ceased to long for the things of this earth. Because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader

Text

The quail, its migration.

Illustration

Portrait of the quail.

Comment

This rather characterless and legless portrait shows the correct tawny colour of the quail but is the wrong shape. The quail has a plump body and minimal tail. Rubrics return in quire 'I'. Initial type 2.

Folio Attributes

  • Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

    Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

    Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks
    Folio Marks

    To make a normal gathering, a sheet of vellum (the skin of a calf, lamb or kid) would be folded over twice and cut around the edges. This would make a gathering or quire of eight folios with sixteen sides. In the Bestiary there are fifteen quires, thirteen of which are made with the usual eight folios. The last two quires, added in the late thirteenth century, have six and four folios respectively. The folios are not precisely cut but in the most regular quires (B and C) they measure 300mm high and 210mm wide. In order to assemble the quires in the correct sequence they were labelled in lead point with letters of the alphabet. Some are missing with the result that the sequence runs -,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,K,-(folio missing),M,N. The last two quires (O and P) are the later additions and are not marked. The quire system was examined by MR James when the book was being rebound and he was able to produce the following analysis of the gatherings: A8 (wants folio 2, 8); B8 (4,5); C8 (4,8); D8 (4,5); E8-L8 (1); M8; N8; O6; P4 (4). Individual sheets in the quire needed to be marked. Although there were eight folios only the first four needed marking because they were folded with the last four. Each sheet was distinctively marked to make sure the quires could not get muddled up. The asterisk sign is repeated in quires B and M but they remain distinct because the B sign is in the top right corner while the M signs are all in the bottom left corner.

  • Initial Type 2

    Initial Type 2

    Initial Type 2
    Type 2 initial. Detail from f.5v

    Type 2 is much more common. The letter is made with burnished gold, filled with a blue or brown background which is decorated with a delicate white tracery. Many of these are embellished with red or blue traces or sprays. The Aberdeen Bestiary is a very early example of the use of sprays which culminates in the art of William de Brailes in the mid-thirteenth century (Morgan 1982,no.68). An elaborate spray is on f.41v. The fine white filigree pattern is also found on some of the illuminations (f.3r, f.11r, f.12r) suggesting that the main illuminator also made these initials. This type generally occupies two lines. This initial is generally used to introduce each new animal.

Transcription

regale quia leo rex ferarum est, et aquila volatilium.\ De coturnice \ Coturnices a sono\ vocis dictas quas Greci\ ortigias vocant eo quod vise\ fuerint primum in Ortigia\ insula. Hee[c] adveniendi habent\ tempora. Nam estate depulsa\ maria transeunt ortigometra\ dicitur que gregem ducat. Hanc\ terre propinquantem, accipi\ ter videns rapit, ac propterea\ cura est universis ducem sollicitare generis externi, pro qua [PL, per quam] caveant\ prima discrimina, cibos gratissimos semina venenorum habent, quam ob\ causam veteres eas vesci interdixerunt, solum enim hoc animal\ sicut et homo caducum patitur morbum. Coturnices adveniendi\ habent tempora, nam maria transeant, estate depulsa. Calor\ estatis, est ardor caritatis. Frigus hiemis, est temptatio refri\ gerate mentis. Ab amore igitur proximi, per mare mundi huius trans\ meat iustus ad amorem dei, ut in calida regione semper maneat\ qui semper calore dilectionis in semetipso flagrat, ut vitet frigus\ hiemis, procellas videlicet et ventos improvise temptationis.\ Ortigometra dicitur que gregem ducit, eam terre propinquantem acci\ piter videns rapit. Terra, sunt terrena desideria. Maria, mundi\ pericula. Accipiter insidians, diabolus per suggestionem temptans.\ Propinquantem igitur terre, accipter videns rapit, quia eos qui terrena\ querunt diabolus secum trahit. Prelatus igitur qui gregem ante\ cedit, diligenter provideat, qua intentione terrena petat, utrum\ in suos usus ea redigat, vel ad necessitatem fratrum ea querat,\ ne accipiter, id est, diabolus eum rapiat, qui postpositis spiritalibus\ terrenis inhiare non cessat. Propterea cura est universis ducem

Translation

because the lion is king of the beasts; the eagle, king of the birds. Of the quail Quails are so called from their call; the Greeks call them ortigie because they were first seen on the island of Ortigia. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The leader of the flock is called ortigometra, 'the quail-mother'. The hawk, seeing the quail-mother approaching land, seizes it; because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader from another species, through whom they guard against this early danger. Their favorite food is the seed of poisonous plants. For this reason, the ancients forbade them to be eaten; for alone among living things, the quail suffers, like man, from the falling sickness. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The heat of summer is the warmth of love. The cold of winter is the temptation of the lethargic mind. From love of his neighbour, therefore, the righteous man crosses the sea of this world to love of God, that he mat stay forever in a warm land, burning continually with the heat of love within, in order to avoid the cold of winter, namely, the storms and winds of unexpected temptation. The leader of the flock is called the quail-mother. The hawk, seeing it approaching land, seizes it. The land represents earthly longings; the sea, the dangers of the world. The hawk, lying in wait, is the Devil, who tempts us by suggestion. Seeing the quail-mother approaching land, therefore, the hawk seizes it, as the Devil drags off with him those who seek earthly things. Let the churchman, therefore, who heads his flock, take careful heed of his purpose in seeking earthly things, whether he acquires them for his own use or seeks them to meet the need of his brothers, lest the hawk, that is, the Devil, should seize him, if he has neglected the things of the spirit and has not ceased to long for the things of this earth. Because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader
  • Commentary

    Text

    The quail, its migration.

    Illustration

    Portrait of the quail.

    Comment

    This rather characterless and legless portrait shows the correct tawny colour of the quail but is the wrong shape. The quail has a plump body and minimal tail. Rubrics return in quire 'I'. Initial type 2.

    Folio Attributes

    • Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

      Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

      Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks
      Folio Marks

      To make a normal gathering, a sheet of vellum (the skin of a calf, lamb or kid) would be folded over twice and cut around the edges. This would make a gathering or quire of eight folios with sixteen sides. In the Bestiary there are fifteen quires, thirteen of which are made with the usual eight folios. The last two quires, added in the late thirteenth century, have six and four folios respectively. The folios are not precisely cut but in the most regular quires (B and C) they measure 300mm high and 210mm wide. In order to assemble the quires in the correct sequence they were labelled in lead point with letters of the alphabet. Some are missing with the result that the sequence runs -,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,K,-(folio missing),M,N. The last two quires (O and P) are the later additions and are not marked. The quire system was examined by MR James when the book was being rebound and he was able to produce the following analysis of the gatherings: A8 (wants folio 2, 8); B8 (4,5); C8 (4,8); D8 (4,5); E8-L8 (1); M8; N8; O6; P4 (4). Individual sheets in the quire needed to be marked. Although there were eight folios only the first four needed marking because they were folded with the last four. Each sheet was distinctively marked to make sure the quires could not get muddled up. The asterisk sign is repeated in quires B and M but they remain distinct because the B sign is in the top right corner while the M signs are all in the bottom left corner.

    • Initial Type 2

      Initial Type 2

      Initial Type 2
      Type 2 initial. Detail from f.5v

      Type 2 is much more common. The letter is made with burnished gold, filled with a blue or brown background which is decorated with a delicate white tracery. Many of these are embellished with red or blue traces or sprays. The Aberdeen Bestiary is a very early example of the use of sprays which culminates in the art of William de Brailes in the mid-thirteenth century (Morgan 1982,no.68). An elaborate spray is on f.41v. The fine white filigree pattern is also found on some of the illuminations (f.3r, f.11r, f.12r) suggesting that the main illuminator also made these initials. This type generally occupies two lines. This initial is generally used to introduce each new animal.

  • Translation
    because the lion is king of the beasts; the eagle, king of the birds. Of the quail Quails are so called from their call; the Greeks call them ortigie because they were first seen on the island of Ortigia. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The leader of the flock is called ortigometra, 'the quail-mother'. The hawk, seeing the quail-mother approaching land, seizes it; because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader from another species, through whom they guard against this early danger. Their favorite food is the seed of poisonous plants. For this reason, the ancients forbade them to be eaten; for alone among living things, the quail suffers, like man, from the falling sickness. Quails have fixed times of migration. For when summer gives way to winter, they cross the sea. The heat of summer is the warmth of love. The cold of winter is the temptation of the lethargic mind. From love of his neighbour, therefore, the righteous man crosses the sea of this world to love of God, that he mat stay forever in a warm land, burning continually with the heat of love within, in order to avoid the cold of winter, namely, the storms and winds of unexpected temptation. The leader of the flock is called the quail-mother. The hawk, seeing it approaching land, seizes it. The land represents earthly longings; the sea, the dangers of the world. The hawk, lying in wait, is the Devil, who tempts us by suggestion. Seeing the quail-mother approaching land, therefore, the hawk seizes it, as the Devil drags off with him those who seek earthly things. Let the churchman, therefore, who heads his flock, take careful heed of his purpose in seeking earthly things, whether he acquires them for his own use or seeks them to meet the need of his brothers, lest the hawk, that is, the Devil, should seize him, if he has neglected the things of the spirit and has not ceased to long for the things of this earth. Because of this, the quails all take care to attract a leader
  • Transcription
    regale quia leo rex ferarum est, et aquila volatilium.\ De coturnice \ Coturnices a sono\ vocis dictas quas Greci\ ortigias vocant eo quod vise\ fuerint primum in Ortigia\ insula. Hee[c] adveniendi habent\ tempora. Nam estate depulsa\ maria transeunt ortigometra\ dicitur que gregem ducat. Hanc\ terre propinquantem, accipi\ ter videns rapit, ac propterea\ cura est universis ducem sollicitare generis externi, pro qua [PL, per quam] caveant\ prima discrimina, cibos gratissimos semina venenorum habent, quam ob\ causam veteres eas vesci interdixerunt, solum enim hoc animal\ sicut et homo caducum patitur morbum. Coturnices adveniendi\ habent tempora, nam maria transeant, estate depulsa. Calor\ estatis, est ardor caritatis. Frigus hiemis, est temptatio refri\ gerate mentis. Ab amore igitur proximi, per mare mundi huius trans\ meat iustus ad amorem dei, ut in calida regione semper maneat\ qui semper calore dilectionis in semetipso flagrat, ut vitet frigus\ hiemis, procellas videlicet et ventos improvise temptationis.\ Ortigometra dicitur que gregem ducit, eam terre propinquantem acci\ piter videns rapit. Terra, sunt terrena desideria. Maria, mundi\ pericula. Accipiter insidians, diabolus per suggestionem temptans.\ Propinquantem igitur terre, accipter videns rapit, quia eos qui terrena\ querunt diabolus secum trahit. Prelatus igitur qui gregem ante\ cedit, diligenter provideat, qua intentione terrena petat, utrum\ in suos usus ea redigat, vel ad necessitatem fratrum ea querat,\ ne accipiter, id est, diabolus eum rapiat, qui postpositis spiritalibus\ terrenis inhiare non cessat. Propterea cura est universis ducem
Folio 57v - the caladrius, continued. De coturnice ; Of the quail | The Aberdeen Bestiary | The University of Aberdeen