The Aberdeen Bestiary

Folio 20v - Dogs, continued. De ove; the sheep


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Commentary, Translation and Transcription

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It is not part of the project to provide a definitive edition of the text of the Bestiary, but to help readers by providing a transcription and translation of the text. Currently the following editorial conventions obtain:

Text

  1. The original capitalisation is retained, but capitals have been added for personal and place names, excluding deus and diabolus.
  2. The original punctuation, including a point and inverted semi-colon (both serving as commas), and a point (serving as a full stop), is represented by comma, full stop and question-mark; a colon has been inserted before quotations.
  3. Suggested readings are in [ ].
  4. Variants from other Bestiary texts (eg Ashmole 1511 and Patrologia Latina 176) are added where they indicate a corruption, elucidate a meaning and replace excised text. They are represented as [A: PL:]

Translation

  1. Direct quotations from the Bible, where identified, are cited from the Authorised Version in ( ).
  2. Paraphrased quotations are identified where possible and indicated as: (see Job, 18:22).
  3. Suggested translations of corrupt words are in [ ].
  4. Capitalisation is sparing; additional punctuation has been used where necessary to give the sense. Paragraphs have been created to break up the text.
will it be presented before its maker? The man who undertakes to order and array his soul, must clothe it decently and fittingly, therefore, so that he can present it in a praiseworthy fashion before the angels in heaven. The first garment in which the soul should be clad is purity. For no soul can be presented in the court of heaven, which now or in the future is not pure. Other garments are piety, charity and other virtues in which it should be attired. Clad in such raiment, with the three guides, purity of thought, chasteness of speech and perfection in deeds, the soul can be presented honourably in the glory of heaven, where it will be rewarded by that blessed state which the angels enjoy, for which God created man, assigning him three counsellors, spiritual understanding, the capacity for doing good, and wisdom; if man accedes to them, he will not lose his heavenly kingdom; because man did not accede to them, he lost his inheritance. Of the sheep The sheep, a gentle animal, its body clad in wool, harmless, placid by nature, gets its name from oblatio, an offering, because men of old offered as a sacrifice not bulls but sheep. Some are called 'bidents', having two teeth among their eight which are more prominent than the others; the pagans dedicated these, in particular, as a sacrifice. As winter approaches, the sheep is ravenous for food and devours grass insatiably, because it senses the coming severity of the season and seeks to stuff itself

Text

The sermon on virtue; Sheep. The gentle animal made for sacrifice.

Comment

The illustration of the sheep is excised. Initial type 2.

Transcription

coram factore suo presentaretur. Oportet ergo ut homo qui ad \regendum et induendum eam suscepit its honeste etc com\petenter induat ut laudabiliter coram angelis eam in celo \presentare valeat. Primum indumentum unde anima vesti\ri debet, est mundicia. Nulla enim in celesti curia presentatur, \que vel hic vel in futuro non mundetur. Alia vero indumen\ta sunt, pietas, misericordia, cetereque virtutes quibus debet ve\stiri. Vera vero talibus indumentis cum tribus conductis, id est cogi\tatione pura, verbo bono, opere perfecto, in celesti gloria honeste potest \presentari, ubi remunerabitur illa beatudine, quam optinent \angeli ad quam optinendum hominem deus creavit, et tres \consiliatores ei attribuit, scilicet spiritualem intellectum, \potestatem bene agendi, et sapientiam, quibus si adquiesce\ret, regnum celeste non amitteret, sed quia illis non adquie\vit hereditatem suam amisit. \ De ove\ Quis molle pecus lanis corpore in erme, animo placidum, ab oblatione dictum, eo quod apud veteres in inicio non tauri, sed oves in sacrificio mactarentur. Ex his quibusdam videntes vocant, easque inter octo dentes duos altiores habent, quos maxime \gentiles in sacrificium offerebant. Ovis sub adventu hye \mis inexplebilis ad escam, insaciabiliter herbam rapit, eo \quod presentiat asperitatem hyemis affuturam, ut se prius herbe \

Translation

will it be presented before its maker? The man who undertakes to order and array his soul, must clothe it decently and fittingly, therefore, so that he can present it in a praiseworthy fashion before the angels in heaven. The first garment in which the soul should be clad is purity. For no soul can be presented in the court of heaven, which now or in the future is not pure. Other garments are piety, charity and other virtues in which it should be attired. Clad in such raiment, with the three guides, purity of thought, chasteness of speech and perfection in deeds, the soul can be presented honourably in the glory of heaven, where it will be rewarded by that blessed state which the angels enjoy, for which God created man, assigning him three counsellors, spiritual understanding, the capacity for doing good, and wisdom; if man accedes to them, he will not lose his heavenly kingdom; because man did not accede to them, he lost his inheritance. Of the sheep The sheep, a gentle animal, its body clad in wool, harmless, placid by nature, gets its name from oblatio, an offering, because men of old offered as a sacrifice not bulls but sheep. Some are called 'bidents', having two teeth among their eight which are more prominent than the others; the pagans dedicated these, in particular, as a sacrifice. As winter approaches, the sheep is ravenous for food and devours grass insatiably, because it senses the coming severity of the season and seeks to stuff itself
  • Commentary

    Text

    The sermon on virtue; Sheep. The gentle animal made for sacrifice.

    Comment

    The illustration of the sheep is excised. Initial type 2.

  • Translation
    will it be presented before its maker? The man who undertakes to order and array his soul, must clothe it decently and fittingly, therefore, so that he can present it in a praiseworthy fashion before the angels in heaven. The first garment in which the soul should be clad is purity. For no soul can be presented in the court of heaven, which now or in the future is not pure. Other garments are piety, charity and other virtues in which it should be attired. Clad in such raiment, with the three guides, purity of thought, chasteness of speech and perfection in deeds, the soul can be presented honourably in the glory of heaven, where it will be rewarded by that blessed state which the angels enjoy, for which God created man, assigning him three counsellors, spiritual understanding, the capacity for doing good, and wisdom; if man accedes to them, he will not lose his heavenly kingdom; because man did not accede to them, he lost his inheritance. Of the sheep The sheep, a gentle animal, its body clad in wool, harmless, placid by nature, gets its name from oblatio, an offering, because men of old offered as a sacrifice not bulls but sheep. Some are called 'bidents', having two teeth among their eight which are more prominent than the others; the pagans dedicated these, in particular, as a sacrifice. As winter approaches, the sheep is ravenous for food and devours grass insatiably, because it senses the coming severity of the season and seeks to stuff itself
  • Transcription
    coram factore suo presentaretur. Oportet ergo ut homo qui ad \regendum et induendum eam suscepit its honeste etc com\petenter induat ut laudabiliter coram angelis eam in celo \presentare valeat. Primum indumentum unde anima vesti\ri debet, est mundicia. Nulla enim in celesti curia presentatur, \que vel hic vel in futuro non mundetur. Alia vero indumen\ta sunt, pietas, misericordia, cetereque virtutes quibus debet ve\stiri. Vera vero talibus indumentis cum tribus conductis, id est cogi\tatione pura, verbo bono, opere perfecto, in celesti gloria honeste potest \presentari, ubi remunerabitur illa beatudine, quam optinent \angeli ad quam optinendum hominem deus creavit, et tres \consiliatores ei attribuit, scilicet spiritualem intellectum, \potestatem bene agendi, et sapientiam, quibus si adquiesce\ret, regnum celeste non amitteret, sed quia illis non adquie\vit hereditatem suam amisit. \ De ove\ Quis molle pecus lanis corpore in erme, animo placidum, ab oblatione dictum, eo quod apud veteres in inicio non tauri, sed oves in sacrificio mactarentur. Ex his quibusdam videntes vocant, easque inter octo dentes duos altiores habent, quos maxime \gentiles in sacrificium offerebant. Ovis sub adventu hye \mis inexplebilis ad escam, insaciabiliter herbam rapit, eo \quod presentiat asperitatem hyemis affuturam, ut se prius herbe \
Folio 20v - Dogs, continued. De ove; the sheep | The Aberdeen Bestiary | The University of Aberdeen