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Folio 93v Translation and Transcription

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    Folio 93v Translation

When the body is carried, we speak of a funeral procession, exequie. When the remains are burned, we call them reliquie. When the body is interred, we say it is now buried, sepultus.

The common word is corpus as in the quotation: 'The bodies of those lacking light' (Vergil, Georgics, 4, 255).

We call someone dead, 'defunct', defunctus, because he has completed the office of life. For we talk of someone having discharged an office, functus officio, because they have completed the duties required of them. In the same way we also talk of someone discharging public business. For this reason, therefore, we use the word defunctus, because the deceased has been set aside from the office of life, or because he has completed the duties of life's day.

The word for 'buried', sepultus, is so called because the body is that point without a pulse, sine pulsu, or palpitation, that is, motionless.

The word sepelire means to bury bodies; we use the words humare and obruere, that is, to cast earth on the body.

Of fire-bearing stones

Transcription

Quod dum portatur exequias dicimus. Crematas re\liquias conditum iam sepultum. Corpus autem a con\suetudine dicitur ut illud: Tum corpora luce carentum. De\functus vocatus, quia officia complevit vite officium. Nam dicimus\ functos officio, quia officia debita compleverunt. Unde est\ et hominibus [PL, honoribus] functus. Hinc ergo defunctus quod ab officio vite\ sit depositus, sive quod sit die functus. Sepultus autem\ dictus eo quod iam sine pulsu et palpitatione est, id est sine\ motu. Sepelire autem est condere corpora, nam humare ob\ruere dicimus, hoc est humum inicere. \ De lapidibus igniferis
   Translation

When the body is carried, we speak of a funeral procession, exequie. When the remains are burned, we call them reliquie. When the body is interred, we say it is now buried, sepultus.

The common word is corpus as in the quotation: 'The bodies of those lacking light' (Vergil, Georgics, 4, 255).

We call someone dead, 'defunct', defunctus, because he has completed the office of life. For we talk of someone having discharged an office, functus officio, because they have completed the duties required of them. In the same way we also talk of someone discharging public business. For this reason, therefore, we use the word defunctus, because the deceased has been set aside from the office of life, or because he has completed the duties of life's day.

The word for 'buried', sepultus, is so called because the body is that point without a pulse, sine pulsu, or palpitation, that is, motionless.

The word sepelire means to bury bodies; we use the words humare and obruere, that is, to cast earth on the body.

Of fire-bearing stones

 

All images Copyright 1995
© Aberdeen University Library

 

 

Translation & Transcription Copyright 1995
© Colin McLaren & Aberdeen University Library


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University of Aberdeen