The Aberdeen Bestiary

Folio 57r - the caladrius, continued.


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Commentary, Translation and Transcription

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It is not part of the project to provide a definitive edition of the text of the Bestiary, but to help readers by providing a transcription and translation of the text. Currently the following editorial conventions obtain:

Text

  1. The original capitalisation is retained, but capitals have been added for personal and place names, excluding deus and diabolus.
  2. The original punctuation, including a point and inverted semi-colon (both serving as commas), and a point (serving as a full stop), is represented by comma, full stop and question-mark; a colon has been inserted before quotations.
  3. Suggested readings are in [ ].
  4. Variants from other Bestiary texts (eg Ashmole 1511 and Patrologia Latina 176) are added where they indicate a corruption, elucidate a meaning and replace excised text. They are represented as [A: PL:]

Translation

  1. Direct quotations from the Bible, where identified, are cited from the Authorised Version in ( ).
  2. Paraphrased quotations are identified where possible and indicated as: (see Job, 18:22).
  3. Suggested translations of corrupt words are in [ ].
  4. Capitalisation is sparing; additional punctuation has been used where necessary to give the sense. Paragraphs have been created to break up the text.
knows that the man is going to die. But if the man's sickness is one from which he will recover, the bird looks him in the face and takes the entire illness upon itself; it flies up into the air, towards the sun, burns off the sickness and scatters it, and the sick man is cured. The caladrius represents our Saviour. Our Lord is pure white without a trace of black, 'who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth' (1 Peter, 2:22). The Lord, moreover, coming from on high, turned his face from the Jews, because they did not believe, and turned to us, Gentiles, taking away our weakness and carrying our sins; raised up on the wood of the cross and ascending on high, 'he led captivity captive and gave gifts unto men, (Ephesians, 4:8). Each day Christ, like the caladrius, attends us in our sickness, examines our mind when we confess, and heals those to whom he shows the grace of repentance. But he turns his face away from those whose heart he knows to be unrepentant. These he casts off; but those to whom he turns his face, he makes whole again. But, you say, because the caladrius is unclean accoording to the law, it ought not to be likened to Christ. Yet John says of God: 'And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up' (4:14); and according to the law, 'the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field' (Genesis, 3:1). The lion and the eagle are unclean, yet they are likened to Christ, because of their royal rank

Text

The Caladrius looks at a sick person, takes the illness upon itself and flies away with the disease to the sun.

Illustration

A caladrius looks towards a sick king, indicating that he will recover.

Comment

Quire indicator 'I' at the bottom of the page. Folio mark 'C' at bottom left.

Folio Attributes

  • Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

    Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

    Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks
    Folio Marks

    To make a normal gathering, a sheet of vellum (the skin of a calf, lamb or kid) would be folded over twice and cut around the edges. This would make a gathering or quire of eight folios with sixteen sides. In the Bestiary there are fifteen quires, thirteen of which are made with the usual eight folios. The last two quires, added in the late thirteenth century, have six and four folios respectively. The folios are not precisely cut but in the most regular quires (B and C) they measure 300mm high and 210mm wide. In order to assemble the quires in the correct sequence they were labelled in lead point with letters of the alphabet. Some are missing with the result that the sequence runs -,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,K,-(folio missing),M,N. The last two quires (O and P) are the later additions and are not marked. The quire system was examined by MR James when the book was being rebound and he was able to produce the following analysis of the gatherings: A8 (wants folio 2, 8); B8 (4,5); C8 (4,8); D8 (4,5); E8-L8 (1); M8; N8; O6; P4 (4). Individual sheets in the quire needed to be marked. Although there were eight folios only the first four needed marking because they were folded with the last four. Each sheet was distinctively marked to make sure the quires could not get muddled up. The asterisk sign is repeated in quires B and M but they remain distinct because the B sign is in the top right corner while the M signs are all in the bottom left corner.

Transcription

cognoscunt quia moriturus est. Si autem infirmitas eius pertinuerit\ ad vitam, intendit in faciem et assumit omnem egritudinem\ hominis intra se, et volat in aera contra solem, et comburit\ infirmitatem eius et dispergit eam, et sanatur infirmus. Caladrius\ habet personam salvatoris nostri. Totus est candidus dominus noster\ nullam habens nigredinem, qui peccatum non fecit nec inventus est\ dolus in ore eius. Veniens autem dominus de excelsis avertit faciem\ suam a Judeis propter incredulitatem illorum, et convertit se ad nos\ gentes tollens infirmitates nostras, et peccata nostra portans, exaltatus\ in lignum crucis et ascendens in altum captivam duxit cap\ tivitatem dedit dona hominibus. Sed et cotidie predictus caladrius\ infirmitates nostras visitat, mentem per confessionem considerat,\ et eos sanat, quibus gratiam penitendi prestat. Ab illis vero faciem aver\ tit, quorum cor impenitens novit. Istos respuit, sed illos in quos\ faciem intendit, sanos reddit. Sed dicis quia caladrius secundum legem\ immundus est, Christo assimilari non debet. Johannes tamen dicit de deo: Quia sicut Moyses exaltavit serpentem in deserto ita exaltari oportet filium hominis,\ et in lege dictus est prudentior omnibus bestiis serpens. Leo et a\ quila immunda sunt, et tamen Christo assimilata sunt, secundum decus\

Translation

knows that the man is going to die. But if the man's sickness is one from which he will recover, the bird looks him in the face and takes the entire illness upon itself; it flies up into the air, towards the sun, burns off the sickness and scatters it, and the sick man is cured. The caladrius represents our Saviour. Our Lord is pure white without a trace of black, 'who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth' (1 Peter, 2:22). The Lord, moreover, coming from on high, turned his face from the Jews, because they did not believe, and turned to us, Gentiles, taking away our weakness and carrying our sins; raised up on the wood of the cross and ascending on high, 'he led captivity captive and gave gifts unto men, (Ephesians, 4:8). Each day Christ, like the caladrius, attends us in our sickness, examines our mind when we confess, and heals those to whom he shows the grace of repentance. But he turns his face away from those whose heart he knows to be unrepentant. These he casts off; but those to whom he turns his face, he makes whole again. But, you say, because the caladrius is unclean accoording to the law, it ought not to be likened to Christ. Yet John says of God: 'And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up' (4:14); and according to the law, 'the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field' (Genesis, 3:1). The lion and the eagle are unclean, yet they are likened to Christ, because of their royal rank
  • Commentary

    Text

    The Caladrius looks at a sick person, takes the illness upon itself and flies away with the disease to the sun.

    Illustration

    A caladrius looks towards a sick king, indicating that he will recover.

    Comment

    Quire indicator 'I' at the bottom of the page. Folio mark 'C' at bottom left.

    Folio Attributes

    • Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

      Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks

      Gatherings, quire marks, folio marks
      Folio Marks

      To make a normal gathering, a sheet of vellum (the skin of a calf, lamb or kid) would be folded over twice and cut around the edges. This would make a gathering or quire of eight folios with sixteen sides. In the Bestiary there are fifteen quires, thirteen of which are made with the usual eight folios. The last two quires, added in the late thirteenth century, have six and four folios respectively. The folios are not precisely cut but in the most regular quires (B and C) they measure 300mm high and 210mm wide. In order to assemble the quires in the correct sequence they were labelled in lead point with letters of the alphabet. Some are missing with the result that the sequence runs -,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,K,-(folio missing),M,N. The last two quires (O and P) are the later additions and are not marked. The quire system was examined by MR James when the book was being rebound and he was able to produce the following analysis of the gatherings: A8 (wants folio 2, 8); B8 (4,5); C8 (4,8); D8 (4,5); E8-L8 (1); M8; N8; O6; P4 (4). Individual sheets in the quire needed to be marked. Although there were eight folios only the first four needed marking because they were folded with the last four. Each sheet was distinctively marked to make sure the quires could not get muddled up. The asterisk sign is repeated in quires B and M but they remain distinct because the B sign is in the top right corner while the M signs are all in the bottom left corner.

  • Translation
    knows that the man is going to die. But if the man's sickness is one from which he will recover, the bird looks him in the face and takes the entire illness upon itself; it flies up into the air, towards the sun, burns off the sickness and scatters it, and the sick man is cured. The caladrius represents our Saviour. Our Lord is pure white without a trace of black, 'who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth' (1 Peter, 2:22). The Lord, moreover, coming from on high, turned his face from the Jews, because they did not believe, and turned to us, Gentiles, taking away our weakness and carrying our sins; raised up on the wood of the cross and ascending on high, 'he led captivity captive and gave gifts unto men, (Ephesians, 4:8). Each day Christ, like the caladrius, attends us in our sickness, examines our mind when we confess, and heals those to whom he shows the grace of repentance. But he turns his face away from those whose heart he knows to be unrepentant. These he casts off; but those to whom he turns his face, he makes whole again. But, you say, because the caladrius is unclean accoording to the law, it ought not to be likened to Christ. Yet John says of God: 'And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up' (4:14); and according to the law, 'the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field' (Genesis, 3:1). The lion and the eagle are unclean, yet they are likened to Christ, because of their royal rank
  • Transcription
    cognoscunt quia moriturus est. Si autem infirmitas eius pertinuerit\ ad vitam, intendit in faciem et assumit omnem egritudinem\ hominis intra se, et volat in aera contra solem, et comburit\ infirmitatem eius et dispergit eam, et sanatur infirmus. Caladrius\ habet personam salvatoris nostri. Totus est candidus dominus noster\ nullam habens nigredinem, qui peccatum non fecit nec inventus est\ dolus in ore eius. Veniens autem dominus de excelsis avertit faciem\ suam a Judeis propter incredulitatem illorum, et convertit se ad nos\ gentes tollens infirmitates nostras, et peccata nostra portans, exaltatus\ in lignum crucis et ascendens in altum captivam duxit cap\ tivitatem dedit dona hominibus. Sed et cotidie predictus caladrius\ infirmitates nostras visitat, mentem per confessionem considerat,\ et eos sanat, quibus gratiam penitendi prestat. Ab illis vero faciem aver\ tit, quorum cor impenitens novit. Istos respuit, sed illos in quos\ faciem intendit, sanos reddit. Sed dicis quia caladrius secundum legem\ immundus est, Christo assimilari non debet. Johannes tamen dicit de deo: Quia sicut Moyses exaltavit serpentem in deserto ita exaltari oportet filium hominis,\ et in lege dictus est prudentior omnibus bestiis serpens. Leo et a\ quila immunda sunt, et tamen Christo assimilata sunt, secundum decus\
Folio 57r - the caladrius, continued. | The Aberdeen Bestiary | The University of Aberdeen