Pope, Alexander (1688-1744)

Biography: Poet and essayist. Born London, 1688. Early education from relatives and priests, then at two small schools in London. Moved to Binfield, Windsor Forest 1700. Debarred from attending university because of his catholicism, so began to self-educate. Resolved to go to London, aged 15, made new literary acquaintances there. Early works: Pastorals (1709), An Essay on Criticism (1711) Messiah (1712), Georgic poem Windsor Forest (1714), epic The Rape of Lock (1712, 1714). Began translation of Homer's Iliad 1711, took 6 years. Moved to Chiswick 1715. Published his Works 1717. Member of the "Scriblerus Club", a group of writers dedicated to the ridicule of false learning. Began building a villa at Twickenham 1719. Edition of Shakespeare, 1725. Translated Homer's Odyssey, published 1726. The Dunciad published anonymously 1728, expanded Dunciad 1729, New Dunciad 1742, and Dunciad in four books 1743. Wrote An Essay on Man (1734), Epistle to Arbuthnot (1735), Imitations of Horace (1733-8). Published his letters 1737. Died Twickenham, 1744. Dogged all his life by severe ill health, due to Pott's disease (tuberculosis of the bone).

This book was presented to Alexander Pope, minister, by Alexander Pope, poet, his namesake. The minister Pope rode from Caithness to Twickenham on a pony in summer 1732 to visit the poet Pope. He was also presented with the poet's translation of Homer's Odyssey and a snuff-box.

Biography Date: 1688-1744

Biography References: LOC; CERL; DNB;


Book List

Items 1 Ordered by Owner, A-Z