Aberdeen anthropologists take part in British Museum exhibition!

Arctic: Culture and Climate is a major new exhibition at the British Museum highlighting the effects of climate change on Arctic indigenous cultures. The exhibition features research from scholars from the Department of Anthropology who have collaborated with the museum curators. Staff members at the department, the only UK research unit specialising on the Arctic indigenous cultures and the North, liaised with indigenous Arctic communities, researched and secured artefacts, and provided valuable advice.

Dr Amber Lincoln, Lead Curator of the Exhibition and Dr Peter Loovers, Project Curator, our former graduate students, have been the driving force of this timely and important exhibition.   

Media on exhibition:

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2020/oct/18/rare-mammoth-tusk-sculpture-on-show-for-first-time-in-arctic-display

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2258202-british-museum-exhibition-shows-how-arctic-culture-is-under-threat/

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/oct/25/arctic-culture-and-climate-review-visions-of-a-vanishing-world

https://www.standard.co.uk/go/london/arts/arctic-british-museum-review-exhibition-a4572434.html

Instagram: #britishmuseum

Image of woman in flowered top sewing sealskin. A photographer is taking a picture of her.

Image 1. Mittimatalingmiut Arnait Miqsuqtuit Collective at work digitally documenting sealskin sewing skills.   Their films were part of the exhibition. Photo: Nancy Wachowich © Mittimatalinqmiut Arnait Miqsuqtuit Collective

Image of a model festival carved from mammoth tusk on a wooden table.

Image 2. Model of Sakha summer festival by Fedor Markov exhibited at the British Museum. Photo: Amber Lincoln.

Image of a man in a blue apron holding a mammoth tusk.

Image 3. Fedor Markov, a Sakha artist, with a mammoth tusk. Markov’s new mammoth ivory carving commissioned by the British Museum is displayed at the exhibition. Photo: Tanya Argounova-Low