Study French at the University of Aberdeen

 

Quand on lit trop vite ou trop doucement on n'entend rien. French has long been regarded as one of the centres of excellence in both research and teaching at the University of Aberdeen. Members of staff in the French Department undertake world-leading research in a range of areas, from Renaissance emblem studies to the politics of culture and difference in contemporary France. Our research interests inform the design and content of courses at all levels of the programme, and at Honours level, students have the chance to study a wide range of topics which reflect the diverse areas of expertise in the department.

We offer undergraduate language courses at all levels from beginners to final year, and a range of option courses covering film, contemporary civilization and culture, Francophone and post-colonial studies, philosophy, history, sociology, autobiography, linguistics, theatre, and most genres and periods of literature from the Middle Ages to the present day. One of the strengths of the undergraduate degree programme is its flexibility, and the possibility it offers of combining French and Francophone studies with almost any other discipline, so you can tailor your degree to suit your own particular needs and interests.

As an integral part of an honours degree in French, you will spend a half-year or a full year in a French-speaking country, either working as a language assistant, or as a visiting student at one of the Erasmus and other institutions with whom we have exchange agreements (these include Lyon, Rennes, Grenoble, Réunion, Brussels, Geneva, Lausanne), or possibly on a work placement (students have undertaken successful placements organised by French with the IFP (Institute of French Petroleum) School in Paris and the Club des Langues in Anglet).

French and Francophone studies are part of a thriving postgraduate and research culture. Members of staff enjoy international reputations, and the department has particular research strengths in the areas of twentieth-century literary theory, cultural studies, comparative literature, Francophone studies, Early Modern literature, eighteenth, language-teaching methodology, and medieval studies. Staff take a leading role in a number of interdisciplinary taught master’s degrees and research centres, including