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FS35ZA: LANDSCAPES OF FILM A (2020-2021)

Last modified: 02 Jul 2020 12:15


Course Overview

This course will invite students to explore the ways films engage with and represent a variety of landscapes, and how, in turn, landscape can influence both the production and the creation of meaning in mainstream, underground and art films of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will study films from around the world alongside theoretical and critical writing on film, landscape, space and place.

Filmmakers to be studied may include, among others: Andrea Arnold, Jane Campion, Joel and Ethan Coen, John Curran, Tacita Dean, Werner Herzog, Im Kwon-taek, Abbas Kiarostami, Ang Lee, Terrence Malick, Philip Noyce, Lynne Ramsay, Andrei Tarkovsky, Agnes Varda and Andrey Zvyagintsev.

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 3
Session Second Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Mr Alan Macpherson

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)
  • Either Programme Level 3 or Programme Level 4
  • Film And Visual Culture (FS)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

Yes

One or more of these courses have a limited number of places. Priority access will be given to students for whom this course is compulsory. Please refer to the Frequently Asked Questions for more details on this process.


Course Description

This course will invite students to explore the ways films engage with and represent a variety of landscapes, and how, in turn, landscape can influence both the production and the creation of meaning in mainstream, underground and art films of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Studying films from around the world we will look at ways in which various landscapes may have been appropriated cinematically for their emotive qualities: to connote feelings of desolation, oppression or plenitude; loneliness, fear or joy. We will also look at landscapes as sites of specific cultural history. But as the course progresses, drawing on contemporary research in cultural and human geographies, and elsewhere, we will explore the ways that studying film can assist in our ability to conceive landscape not only as a static or symbolic entity, but as a highly mobile, interactive site in which history, experience and materiality converge in the ongoing production of space and meaning. In this way, we will consider how film articulates John Wylie’s provocative claim that ‘landscape is tension’.

This interdisciplinary course will draw on writings from film and cultural theorists, philosophers, artists and social scientists. Filmmakers to be studied may include, among others: Andrea Arnold, Jane Campion, Joel and Ethan Coen, John Curran, Tacita Dean, Werner Herzog, Grant Gee, Im Kwon-taek, Abbas Kiarostami, Ang Lee, Philip Noyce, Lynne Ramsay, Walter Salles, Andrei Tarkovsky, Agnes Varda and Andrey Zvyagintsev.


Contact Teaching Time

Information on contact teaching time is available from the course guide.

Teaching Breakdown

  • 1 Seminar during University weeks 25 - 34, 38

More Information about Week Numbers


In light of Covid-19 and the move to blended learning delivery the assessment information advertised for courses may be subject to change. All updates for first-half session courses will be actioned no later than 1700 (GMT) on 18 September 2020. All updates for second half-session courses will be actioned in advance of second half-session teaching starting. Please check back regularly for updates.

Summative Assessments

Seminar Assessment Mark 20%

Group Presentation and Reflective Report 40%

Essay 40%

Formative Assessment

There are no assessments for this course.

Course Learning Outcomes

Knowledge LevelThinking SkillOutcome
ConceptualEvaluateStudents will learn to evaluate the role of landscape across multiple film styles
ReflectionCreateStudents will develop the ability to design and deliver an effective presentation to a group
ProceduralEvaluateStudents will be able to use appropriate methodologies and synthesise ideas drawn from a variety of sources
ReflectionEvaluateStudents will develop the ability to manage their time and workload effectively
ReflectionCreateStudents will be able to produce written reflection across a range of styles
ConceptualEvaluateStudents will be able to identify key claims and summarize arguments
ReflectionApplyStudents will develop the ability to participate in reflective discussion and lead seminar discussion
ConceptualAnalyseStudents will develop knowledge and understanding of theories of landscape, space and place
ConceptualApplyStudents will be able to work in an interdisciplinary fashion
ProceduralApplyStudents will develop the ability to work independently and in groups
ReflectionCreateStudents will learn to write clearly and construct coherent arguments
ReflectionAnalyseStudents will develop the ability to engage in critical thinking

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