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DR1045: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HUMAN? (2017-2018)

Last modified: 15 Sep 2017 14:46


Course Overview

This course explores primary themes in Practical Theology from perspective of human beings as they actually exist rather than as we imagine them to be. We will explore issues in the Christian life from the perspective of the socially marginalised through a survey of the historical tradition. This survey may cover thinkers like the following: the Church Fathers, Augustine, Aquinas, etc . By asking questions about what it means to be human through such an "upside down anthropology" a model of practical theology is developed which informs how one understands Christian practice in churches and in society.  Download Course Guide

Course Details

Study Type Undergraduate Level 1
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 15 credits (7.5 ECTS credits)
Campus Old Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Armand Leon Van Ommen

Qualification Prerequisites

  • Either Programme Level 1 or Programme Level 2

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Undergraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

  • DR2020 Christian Doctrine and Practice (Studied)
  • DR2050 What Does It Mean to Be Human? Learning from the Margins (Studied)
  • DR2557 Major Christian Thinkers (Studied)
  • (Studied)

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

This course explores primary themes in Practical Theology (eg Pastoral Care, Mission, and Worship) from the perspective of human beings as they actually exist rather than as we imagine them to be. We will explore issues in the Christian life from the perspective of the socially marginalised through a survey of the historical tradition. This survey may cover thinkers like the following: the Church Fathers, Augustine, Aquinas, Julian of Norwich, the Reformers, Bonhoeffer, Barth, Reinders, Eisland, Vanier and Hauerwas. By asking questions about what it means to be human through such an "upside down anthropology" a model of practical theology is developed which informs how one understands Christian practice in churches and in society.

Degree Programmes for which this Course is Prescribed

None.

Contact Teaching Time

32 hours

This is the total time spent in lectures, tutorials and other class teaching.

Teaching Breakdown


Assessment

1st Attempt: 

Summative assessment:

  • an essay of 2.500 words (60%);
  • writing a case study 2.000 words (40%).

 

Resit: 1 two-hour exam (100%).

Formative Assessment

Formative feedback:

Practicing for and writing two tutorial papers of 400-500 words. Peer feedback during tutorials.

Feedback

None.

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