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DR504A: THE MUSLIM EVE: IMAGES OF THE ARCHETYPAL WOMAN (2016-2017)

Last modified: 14 Apr 2017 11:36


Course Overview

Eve is a highly significant character in all societies and cultures influenced by the 'Abrahamic' religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). Perceived as the archetypal woman to this day, the image of Eve has influenced gender relations and the representation of women on numerous levels of these cultures, encompassing both social and religious, but also political, legal, cultural and literary functions and representations. This course will analyse the various images of Eve in Islam, revealing the significance of these images in legitimising social, religious, legal and other perceptions of women in Islam. 

Course Details

Study Type Postgraduate Level 5
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus Old Aberdeen Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Zohar Hadromi-Allouche

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Postgraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

None.

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

Eve is a highly significant character in all societies and cultures influenced by the 'Abrahamic' religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). However, her image and its multiple implications, differ among these religious traditions. Whereas the Bible (Genesis 3) Depicts Eve as feeding the forbidden fruit to Adam, the Qur'ānic Paradise narrative altogether lacks the seductive female motif. Nevertheless, later Islamic sources do reflect themes such Eve the temptress, and demonisation of the feminine body and spirit. Perceived as the archetypal woman to this day, the image of Eve has influenced gender relations and the representation of women on numerous levels. In this course students will explore the complex character and many depictions of Eve (Hawa') in Islam, from a fallen figure to a prophetess; and examine how these religious and literary images serve to legitimise social, religious, legal and other perceptions of womanhood in Islam.

Degree Programmes for which this Course is Prescribed

None.

Contact Teaching Time

Sorry, we don't have that information available.

Teaching Breakdown


Assessment

2x 1000 word book review (10% each review) (20%); 1x5000 word essay (70%); Contribution to Online Discussion Forum (10%).

Resit: 1x6000 word essay.

Formative Assessment

None.

Feedback

Formal feedback will be provided for students' submitted work through assessment report. 

Formal and informal feedback will be provided throughout the course in seminar discussions anad through one-to-one communication. 

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