production
Skip to Content

AT5027: ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY FOR MSC (2016-2017)

Last modified: 16 Nov 2016 17:59


Course Overview

This course explores theoretical issues and key debates in contemporary anthropology. We begin with the questioning of the central concepts of culture and society in anthropology during the 1980s. Following this, we ask: how can anthropology proceed if the targets of its investigation can no longer be understood as objective entities? How can anthropology proceed if the anthropologist themselves is inevitably implicated in and part of those very targets? To look for possible answers, the course examines current anthropological interest in power and history, political economy and phenomenology, experience, embodiment and practice, ontology and things that speak.

Course Details

Study Type Postgraduate Level 5
Session First Sub Session Credit Points 30 credits (15 ECTS credits)
Campus None. Sustained Study No
Co-ordinators
  • Dr Arnar Arnason

What courses & programmes must have been taken before this course?

  • Any Postgraduate Programme (Studied)

What other courses must be taken with this course?

None.

What courses cannot be taken with this course?

Are there a limited number of places available?

No

Course Description

This course explores theoretical issues and key debates in contemporary anthropology. We begin by establishing a broad overview of theoretical developments in anthropology. We will then review how the central concepts of culture and society were rethought in anthropology during the 1980s. Following on from this, we ask the questions that underlie the discussions during the course: how can anthropology proceed if the targets of its investigation can no longer be understood as objective entities? How can anthropology proceed if the anthropologist themeselves is inevitably implicated in and part of those very targets? To look for possible answers, the course examines current anthropological interest in power and history, political economy and phenomenology, experience, embodiment and practice. While the intent is theoretical these issues and debates will be explored largely through ethnographic writing on such subjects as emotions and the body, genetics and reproduction, personhood and politics, death, memory and forgetting. Emphasis will be placed on encouraging students to apply theoretical insights from anthropology to their everyday lives and the world around them.

Degree Programmes for which this Course is Prescribed

None.

Contact Teaching Time

55 hours

This is the total time spent in lectures, tutorials and other class teaching.

Teaching Breakdown


Assessment

100% coursework.

Formative Assessment

None.

Feedback

None.

Compatibility Mode

We have detected that you are have compatibility mode enabled or are using an old version of Internet Explorer. You either need to switch off compatibility mode for this site or upgrade your browser.