Consequences of predictive language processing for memory

Consequences of predictive language processing for memory
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Language arrives in the form of a rapid input stream that needs to be decoded at high speed. There is now an emerging consensus that the input is to some extent predictable, and that the brain exploits this predictability by thinking ahead about upcoming words. However, it is unclear whether prediction has any downstream consequences for what readers ultimately retain in memory. I will present EEG studies that probed these consequences using incidental repetition and recognition memory tasks. The results suggest that prediction can improve memory for surprising input, but it can also lead to false memories for expected words that were never actually presented.

Speaker
Dr Joost Rommers
Hosted by
School of Psychology
Venue
University of Aberdeen
Contact

Dr Chu or Ms Carolyn Porter (01224 272227)