UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN

SENATUS ACADEMICUS

Minutes of the meeting held on Wednesday 18 June 2003

Present: Principal, Professors Sewel, Logan. Houlihan. Dr JG Roberts, Professors Rodger, Torrance, MacGregor, Ms C Macaslan, Professors Thomson, Sleeman, Baker, Joliffe, Bruce, Racey, Sharp, Macinnes, Gane, Webster, Killham, Jordan, Fraser, Bryden, Graham, Flin, Dawson, Watson, Leboutte, Simpson, Howe, Player, Ayres, Roberts, Beaumont, Mitchell, Hunter, Ditchburn, Secombes, Dr B Fennell, Dr S Kunin, Ms R Buchan, Dr J Murdoch, Ms M Ramsay, Dr WF Long, Dr AD Clarke, Mr I Stephanov, Mr G Pryor, Professors Duff, Hotson, Lurie, Salmon, Saunders, Shucksmith, Swanson, Adams, Dr D Adams, Dr P Benson, Mr WT Brotherstone, Ms L Clark, Dr G Coghill, Dr J Geddes, Dr C Gray, Dr D Hay, Dr M Holmes, Dr J King, Dr PR Kinnear, Dr X Lambin, Dr J MacDowall, Dr H MacKenzie, Ms DW McKenzie Smith, Dr D Macphee, Dr MR Masson, Dr A Memon, Dr D Pearson, Dr LJ Philip, Mrs ML Ross, Dr J Skakle, Mr SC Styles, Dr M Syrotinski, Dr C Thomson, Dr SP Townsend, Dr M White, Dr N Dower, Mr D Cockburn, Mr J Dunphy, Mr M Raith with Ms J Duncan in attendance.

Apologies for absence were received from Professors Templeton, Urwin, Little, Alexander, Dunkley, Ms L Stephen, Professors Archbold, Blaikie, Gow, Reid, Dr S Lawrie, Dr J Farmer, Dr D Heddle, Mrs B Hookey, Dr A Hull, Dr WD McCausland, Dr P Tomassi, Dr H Wallace and Ms D White.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES

  1. The minutes of the meeting held on 7 May 2003 were approved. In doing so, the Senate noted that the University Committee on Teaching and Learning would consider further the practicability of examinations that were held during the formal examination diets, particularly the resit diet, not being timetabled on Saturdays or during weekday evenings. [Minute 735 refers].

CONSULTATION ON UNIVERSITY RESEARCH

    1. Professor Houlihan, on invitation from the Principal, drew Senate’s attention to the paper that had been

circulated concerning three consultation documents on University Research: a consultation on the Review of Research Assessment; a consultation on reforming parts of the Dual Support System in regard to the Sustainability of University Research; and a consultation on the Development of Threshold Standards for Research Degree Programmes. [Minute 755 refers].

744.2 Since the closing date for response to all three documents was 30 September 2003, i.e. before the next meeting of the Senate, Professor Houlihan indicated that the University’s response would be formulated in early September and would be circulated to the academic community before submission.

744.3 Senate noted that comments on the proposals should be submitted by 1 September at the latest, so that these could be taken into consideration in preparing the University’s response.

COLLEGES: AN OUTLINE PROPOSAL

745.1 The Principal introduced a paper concerning the proposal to establish three academic Colleges (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes). The Principal indicated that, in broad terms, he was in favour of the proposal, and recognised that the details to underpin the principles needed to be developed. While the establishment of Colleges would not solve all of the University’s problems or avoid difficult decisions being made, the Principal believed that the proposal provided the framework for improving the University’s teaching and learning provision and would provide the most effective model to distribute resources to provide high level research. The proposal would also provide greater intellectual integrity and coherence than the present structures.

745.2 Professor Sewel indicated that the proposal was the culmination of a long and detailed process of analysis: this had commenced after the publication of the results of the last research assessment exercise; had continued during discussions concerning the possible merger with The Robert Gordon University; and had taken account of a detailed analysis of the costed academic plans that had been developed this academic year. He indicated that, as a consequence of this information and analysis, the University was now aware, at a detailed level, of the opportunities and of some of the threats concerning the University’s intellectual activities.

745.3 Professor Sewel apologised for the speed with which the proposed changes had been formulated and brought forward for discussion. This was the consequence of rapid changes in the external environment and, in particular, the funding councils’ decision to bring forward the next research assessment exercise by one year. As a consequence of these changes, there had been sustained and detailed consultation throughout the University over the last month in particular, and the paper brought before the Senate had been much changed, compared with the original proposal, as a consequence of the consultation process.

745.4 Professor Sewel indicated that the Senate was being asked to approve, in principle, the decision to create three Colleges, and he believed that one of the main concerns would probably be clarity in relation to the internal governance of the Colleges. Much thought had been given to whether the proposal should be prescriptive in this regard, but this had been considered not to be the best way forward: it was considered unlikely that one model would suit all colleges. It would be for the Heads of College to bring forward detailed proposals for approval by the Principal; and that, in doing so, the Heads of College would undertake consultations in accordance with the guiding principles for academic governance as stated in the paper, with their proposals being tested against those principles.

745.5 Professor Sewel formally commended the proposal to the Senate. The Deans were then asked to summarise the consultations that they had undertaken before opening the debate.

745.6 Each Dean, in turn, informed the Senate of the consultations that they had undertaken and encouraged within their Faculties. And the Senate noted that, where appropriate, consultations had also been undertaken with colleagues from other Faculties where, under the proposed college structure, staff currently in different Faculties would become part of a single college.

745.7 The consensus of opinion emanating from all Faculties was one of positive support for the proposals while echoing the comments recorded above concerning the speed with which the proposals had been brought to the Senate and the detail, particularly in regard to internal governance, that required to be addressed. Nevertheless, staff recognised that the proposal to establish Colleges would bring opportunities to explore new configurations, both in teaching and research, and that new opportunities would be created for students and staff. There was also a general view that decisions needed to be taken quickly to finalise the allocation of staff and academic units to Colleges. The need to establish good cross-college linkages and encourage inter-college activity had also been identified.

745.8 During the discussion that followed, the following main points were noted:-

    1. agreement that outstanding boundary issues would be resolved quickly. The relevant Deans would consult within their Faculties and submit recommendations to the Principal. These would be based on the institutional interest and the importance of maintaining intellectual integrity;
    2. confirmation that the current procedures for the appointment of Heads of School would be implemented for new appointments, i.e. such appointments would be made after seeking representation and undertaking appropriate consultation;
    3. agreement that there should be regular, University-wide meetings with Heads of School and the Senior Management as a feature of the University’s governance and planning structures. Although one member expressed alarm at this proposal, which he believed would add an extra layer of bureaucracy, the Senate noted that two such meetings had already taken place this academic year and had been beneficial and generally well received;
    4. that while the tone of the document was very welcome, the proposal should not be seen as a criticism of Schools, which would continue to play a key role in the academic management structure of the University. Indeed, the proposal should enable improved support to Schools by permitting flexibility in the use of scarce resources, which should allow Heads of School more opportunity to undertake their management functions;
    5. some concern at the place of disciplines within the sub-school structures, and support for the proposal to review Senate membership in acknowledgement of the necessity to ensure appropriate disciplinary representation;
    6. a view that clearer structures were required for meaningful consultation within Colleges and that staff, including Senior Management, should be fully accountable for their activities; this should include financial accounts being open to more transparent scrutiny than hitherto;
    7. a concern that the proposed Colleges should not just be a re-packaging of the existing faculty structures but should encourage new opportunities for research synergies to be explored and equitable workloads to be established;
    8. support for reduced bureaucracy in teaching administration, which would release academic staff time;
    9. recognition that there would be operational costs to implement the proposed changes;
    10. acceptance that it would be for each Head of College to bring forward proposals for sub-college structures, after full and transparent consultation, and that these would be brought before the Senate during the Autumn, for report and approval;
    11. acceptance that some disciplines, which were generally under-funded throughout the higher education sector, were important to the maintenance of the University’s mission and that budget settlements should continue to recognise, where appropriate, an element of cross-subsidisation, provided that this was controlled;
    12. an expression of scepticism that the proposal would make little difference and a concern at the opportunity costs of staff involvement in developing and implementing the proposal, which would distract academics from undertaking research;
    13. a view that the outcomes of internal management decisions, rather than factors external to the University, created bureaucracy and were a primary concern among staff;
    14. a suggestion that the way in which the proposals had been brought to the Senate served to dis-empower the Senate;
    15. A rejection of the above suggestion: on the contrary, the detailed consultation process that had been undertaken at many levels, in which comments had been actively sought, had resulted in substantial revisions to the original proposal to establish Colleges. This had been designed to empower the Senate and demonstrated that a decision in regard to the proposal had not already been taken prior to the Senate meeting;
    16. a view that too much weight had been given to the success in the next RAE being the determining factor for developing the proposal and that there were apparently no acceptable alternatives: and that the University should play an active role in clarifying within the sector the definition of a research-led institution and the integration of research with teaching and learning;
    17. the hope that all areas of the University would be required, in the future, to implement decisions of the Senate that had been reached after a democratic process, where these concerned the entire institution, i.e. that Colleges would not be independent in that they would not be able to make decisions that would affect the institution as a whole: rather, such issues would be debated at the institutional level.

In addition to the above, several members expressed support for the proposal and the underlying principles, and this view was overwhelmingly supported by a show of hands. The Senate, therefore, for its part, approved the proposal to establish three academic colleges: a College of Life Sciences and Medicine; a College of Arts and Social Sciences; a College of Physical Sciences.

MOTION FROM PRESIDENT OF THE STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

746.1 After discussion, the Senate approved the following motion, which was proposed by Mr Cockburn and seconded by Mr Raith:

"That the Senate believes that students should be given every opportunity to develop their transferable skills while at the University. Senate recognises the role that the Students’ Association and its activities, as well as part-time paid and voluntary work, has to contribute to the acquisition and development of such transferable skills, in addition to those acquired through academic study."

746.2 In approving the above motion, the Senate noted that the University Committee on Teaching and Learning had already established a working group to consider Personal Development Planning in a wider context, and that the group included representation from the Students’ Association.

 

 

REPORT FROM THE UNIVERSITY COURT

(27 May 2003)

 

1. Outcome of Costed Academic Plans: Proposals to Create a College Structure
747.1 The Senate noted that the Court had approved in principle proposals to create a College structure, on the understanding that appropriate consultation with staff and students be undertaken in the preparation of more detailed proposals on the internal governance of the individual Colleges, upon which Court would take a formal decision on whether to approve the College structure at its next meeting.
747.2 The Court, having approved in principle the establishment a College structure, also approved the appointment of, with immediate effect, the following individuals as Heads of College (Designate), with authority to take forward preliminary planning for transition to the new structure:
Proposed College of Arts & Social Sciences Professor B D MacGregor
Proposed College of Life Sciences & Medicine Professor S D Logan
Proposed College of Physical Sciences Professor A A Rodger
747.3 These appointments would be translated on the date of the formal establishment of Colleges to substantive appointments as Heads of College, with the title and status of Vice-Principal, for a fixed period of five years subject to review after an initial twelve months.
2. Membership of the University Committee on Teaching and Learning
747.4 The Senate noted that the Court had approved a recommendation of the Senate of 07.05.03, that "a representative from each Faculty, nominated by the Dean" be added to the composition of the UCTL instead of "the Conveners of the Faculty Teaching & Learning Committees (or equivalent)" being in attendance.
3. Library Access Policy
    1. The Senate noted that the Court had approved, on the recommendation of the Information Management Committee the Library Access Policy, as approved by Senate, for its part, on 07.05.03.

REPORT FROM THE JOINT PLANNING, FINANCE AND ESTATES COMMITTEE

(13 May 2003)

1. Funding for Teaching and Research 2003/04
    1. The Senate noted that the Joint Planning, Finance and Estates Committee (JPFEC), had received a copy of SHEFC circular letter HE/09/03, detailing Main Grants in Support of Teaching and Research for the academic year 2003/04. Copies of the letter were available on request from the Court & Planning Office, or on the SHEFC website at http://www.shefc.ac.uk
    2. The JPFEC had noted that, although SHEFC had relaxed the requirement for the annual submission of strategic plans, Universities must continue to demonstrate progress in particular areas as specified under the condition of grant, namely (i) equality of opportunity and widening access, (ii) maintaining and enhancing the quality of learning and teaching, (iii) maintaining and developing the quality of the research base and fully exploiting the potential for knowledge transfer, and (iv) developing the highest calibre of management and leadership and sound business processes.

REPORT FROM THE UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE ON TEACHING AND LEARNING

(23 May 2003)

 

  1. Institutional Academic Profile
  2. 749.1 The Senate approved the proposed Institutional Academic Profile (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

     

     

     

  3. Revised Procedures for Internal Teaching Review
  4. 749.2 The Senate approved revised procedures for Internal Teaching Review (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

  5. Code of Practice on Student Discipline
  6. 749.3 The Senate approved the UCTL response to the issues raised by the Senate on 7 May 2003 in regard to the revised Code of Practice on Student Discipline (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes) and agreed to forward to the University Court the draft Resolution that had been considered at the Senate on 7 May 2003, after amendment in light of the above paper from the UCTL.

  7. Remit and Composition of the Students’ Progress Committee
  8. 749.4 The Senate approved revisions to the remit and composition of the Students’ Progress Committees (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes), and agreed to delegate authority to the Students’ Progress Committees to take decisions on behalf of the Senate in regard to item 2 of the remit, with appeals against such decisions being to the University Court (as is currently the case in regard to item 1 of the remit).

  9. Job Description of UPC Convener
  10. 749.5 The Senate approved the addition of the following duty to the Job Description of Undergraduate Progress Committee Conveners:

    ‘To consider applications from UK and EU undergraduate full-time students seeking support from the University for their application for payment of tuition fees from public funds for a repeat period of study.’

    749.6 The Senate noted that the revision had been proposed in the light of the above revisions to the remit and composition of the Students’ Progress Committee.

  11. Certification of Absence on Medical Grounds or other Good Cause
  12. 749.7 The Senate approved a revised policy on Certification of Absence on Medical Grounds or other Good Cause (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes). The revisions had been made (i) to bring the document in line with the revised Guidance Notes on Academic Appeals and Student Complaints that would be brought to the Senate in November 2003 and (ii) to address guidance from the Scottish Executive Health Department guidance regarding the provision of medical certificates.

  13. Wednesday Afternoon Teaching
  14. 749.8 The Senate approved the following revision to paragraph 6.11.2 of the Academic Quality Handbook in regard to teaching on Wednesday Afternoon Teaching (additions being shown in bold, deletions being scored through):

    "The University’s policy is that Departments may request that teaching activities be timetabled on a Wednesday afternoon after 1.00 pm in the Winter, and Spring and Summer Terms provided that the same activities are available at another time during the same week. This should ensure that students have the choice to attend on Wednesday afternoons or at some other time. Requests for exemption from this policy (e.g. for School Placement or Clinical Teaching) should be submitted to the Assistant Registrar, Registry Services for consideration by the Vice-Principal (Teaching & Learning)."

  15. Procedures for Dealing with Allegations of Plagiarism Against Graduates of the University
  16. 749.9 The Senate approved procedures for dealing with Allegations of Plagiarism against Graduates of the University (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes), which had been prepared in consultation with the Deans, the Academic Standards Committee (Postgraduate) and senior staff in the School of Law.

  17. Policy on Permitting Students to Tape Record Lectures
  18. 749.10 The Senate approved a Policy on Permitting Students to Tape Record Lectures that would form Appendix 5.20 of the Academic Quality Handbook (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

  19. Compliance with the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework.

749.11 The Senate approved recommendations in regard to ensuring compliance of non-Honours and Designated Degrees with the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

11. Role of External Examiners in Approving First Half-Session CAS marks

749.12 The Senate noted that, following a request from a Head of School, the UCTL had given consideration to the University’s procedures for approving first half-session CAS marks and results. Following consultation with Heads of School/Department, the UCTL had agreed to reaffirm the current policies for (a) the approval/moderation of marks and results and (b) the selection of scripts and other work to be sent/made available to the External Examiner, with the proviso that Schools/Departments may apply to the UCTL for "non-Honours" CAS marks to be provisional until June: the result of these courses, however, should be confirmed by External Examiners in January/February.

749.13 The UCTL had further agreed that Heads of School/Department should ensure that, in consulting prospective External Examiners as to their willingness to act prior to submitting a formal nomination to the University, they should specify the University’s requirements for External Examiners in regard to the timing of scripts and other work that they would be asked to review, and of the marks/results that they would be asked to approve, which should be in accordance with the University’s policies as defined in Section 7 of the Academic Quality Handbook.

749.14 Heads of Department in the Faculty of Education had also requested a change in the policy whereby overall course CAS marks were only released to students by the Registry. The undergraduate and postgraduate CPD credit-bearing provision was undertaken on a part-time basis, often by distance learning and did not have fixed starting points. Students were able to embark on courses at any time of the year and often required a pass in one course before they were permitted to register for another course. Assessments were usually in-course assignments rather than examinations. Current practice in the Faculty was that they released provisional marks to these students and that the External Examiner usually only confirmed these annually in June: thus these marks could remain provisional for many months. Students who had provisionally failed were permitted to resit and the resit was usually undertaken and marked before the Examiners had confirmed the first attempt provisional mark.

749.15 In addition, PCGE students had a guaranteed induction year that commenced in the August immediately following the completion of their studies. In order that there was no delay in the commencement of their induction year, the Faculty had requested that these students also be permitted to resit any failed assessments before the External Examiner confirmed the mark.

749.16 The Senate noted that, following discussion of this matter at the UCTL, it had been agreed that, exceptionally, the Faculty of Education could continue to release overall provisional course CAS marks together with feedback to students, with these marks being confirmed by the External Examiner(s) three times each year. This had been approved on the proviso that, in the case of marks in the range CAS 7-10, candidates’ scripts should be sent to the External Examiner(s) on a monthly basis for confirmation of the CAS marks before the marks were released to the students. This would enable those students who had failed a course to be offered a resit opportunity as soon as possible.

12. Code of Practice on Teaching

749.17 The Senate noted that the UCTL had approved the addition of the following to the end of the Code of Practice for Undergraduate Teaching and the Code of Practice: Postgraduate Taught Student:

Code of Practice for Undergraduate Teaching

Problems and Difficulties

The University aims to provide a welcoming and supportive environment for its undergraduate students. However, from time to time students will encounter problems and difficulties. Complaints should be addressed in the first instance to the person who is in charge of the particular area of the University's activity concerned, e.g. a Head of School/Department about academic matters, a Warden about residential matters. Your Adviser or the Students' Association will assist you if you are unsure as to how to pursue a complaint.'

 

Code of Practice: Postgraduate Taught Students

Problems and Difficulties

The University aims to provide a welcoming and supportive environment for its postgraduate students. However, from time to time students will encounter academic problems and difficulties. In the first instance, they should raise them with their taught Postgraduate Co-ordinator, but if this is not possible they should see their Head of Department. If problems continue, they may wish to contact the relevant University Postgraduate Officer (via the University Postgraduate Registry).’

13. Race Equality Action Plan

749.18 The Senate noted that the UCTL had approved sections 4, 5 and 6 of the revised version of the Race Equality Action Plan.

14. Review of SENAS Forms and Procedures for Course and Programme Approval

    1. The Senate noted that a review of SENAS forms and procedures for course and programme approval would be undertaken over the summer, in consultation with UPC and ASC Conveners and Heads of School/Department. It was intended that proposals would be circulated to UCTL members for approval in order that the revised documentation and procedures could be considered by the Senate at its meeting on 9 October, with a view to the revised procedures being adopted for the 2003/04 Planning Cycle.

REPORT FROM THE ACADEMIC STANDARDS COMMITTEES

New and Discontinued Courses and Programmes

750.1 The Senate noted that the Academic Standards Committee, on the recommendation of the relevant Faculties, had approved changes to the list of courses and programmes available as under, subject where indicated to resolution of queries with individual Schools and Departments:

    1. Individual Degree and Diploma Courses (Undergraduate)

Anthropology

Introduction of a new level 3 course: ‘Writing Anthropology’.

Withdrawal of the course: AT4002.

Biomedical Sciences

Introduction of a new Level 3 course: ‘Sports Practicum and Safety’ (replaces SR3013 and SR3505)

Celtic

Withdrawal of courses: CE2015 and CE2515.

Cultural History

Introduction of a new level 2 course: ‘‘The Second Sex’? – Women in Culture and Society, c2000 – c1000’.

Curriculum Studies

Introduction of new level 4 courses: ‘Middle Stages Focus (Module 1A p/t)’, ‘Upper Stages Focus (Module 2A p/t)’, ‘Nursery & Early Stages Focus (Module 3A p/t)’, ‘Teaching Modern Languages in the Primary School’, ‘Gaelic Medium Education’, ‘Science in the Primary Curriculum’.

French

Introduction of amended level 3 courses for Erasmus students: ‘Level 3 French Language 3’ (first half-session) and ‘Level 3 French Language 3’ (second half-session).

 

Geology

Introduction of new Level 4, Advanced Study Electives: ‘Basin Analysis’, ‘Geochemistry’, ‘Evolution’, ‘Palaeoecology’, ‘Geophysics’, ‘Hydrogeology’, ‘Ore Geology’, ‘Petrophysics’, ‘Bulk Resources’, ‘Sedimentary Environments’, ‘Petrology’ and ‘Tectonics’

Introduction of new Level 4, Electives in Research Techniques: ‘Current Issues in Geoscience’, ‘Techniques in Minerology’, ‘Techniques in Petroleum Geology’ and ‘Techniques in Sedimentary Basins’

Withdrawal of courses GL4016, GL4014, GL4005, GL4505, GL3506, GL3013, GL3501, GL3510, GL3511, GL4006, GL4009, GL4013, GL4510, GL4513, GL4514, GL3509

History

Introduction of a new level 2 course: ‘Conquering a Continent, c1800-1900’.

Introduction of new level 3 courses: ‘World War One: International Perspectives’, ‘The Thirty Years War’.

Italian

Introduction of amended level 2 courses: ‘Intermediate Italian 1’ (replacing IT2002), ‘Intermediate Italian 2’ (replacing IT502).

Key Learning

Introduction of a new level 1 course: ‘An Introduction to Local History’.

Introduction of new level 2 courses: ‘French Language and Society 1’, ‘French Language and Society 2’.

Law

Introduction of new level 4 courses: ‘Legal Issues Involving Art and Antiquities (Honours)’, ‘Environmental Law (Honours)’.

Lifelong Learning Studies

Introduction of new level 3 courses: ‘Children in Need of Protection – Recognising & Responding to Abuse & Neglect’, ‘The Complex Professional Context of Child Care and Protection’, ‘Assessment, Planning and Decision Making in Child Care and Protection’, ‘Working with Children, Young People and their Carers in Child Care and Protection’.

Introduction of a new level 4 course: ‘Learning and Teaching with ICT in the Primary School’.

Medicine

Introduction of new Level 4 courses: ‘Special Project in Philosophy for Medical Students’, ‘Health Studies in Education’, ‘Music: Historical Studies for Medical Students’, and ‘Learning, Teaching and Assessment in Medical Education’.

Politics and International Relations

Introduction of a new level 3 course: ‘East Asian International Relations’.

Introduction of new level 4 courses: ‘Diplomacy and Statecraft’, ‘"Development" and the Governance of the Global Political Economy’, ‘World Order in Transition: Global Governance and Political Challenges’.

Sociology

Introduction of a new level 4 course: ‘Politics and Religion’.

 

Zoology

Withdrawal of course ZO4801

(B) New and Withdrawn Certificate and Degree Programmes (Undergraduate)

Degree of Master of Arts

Introduction of new Joint Honours programmes in ‘Divinity and Legal Studies’, ‘Economics (Economic History) and Legal Studies’, ‘Economics (Economic Science) and Legal Studies’, ‘Economics (Political Economy) and Legal Studies’, ‘English and Legal Studies’, ‘Entrepreneurship and Legal Studies’, ‘Finance and Legal Studies’, ‘French and Legal Studies (Mode A)’, ‘French and Legal Studies (Mode B)’, ‘German and Legal Studies (Mode A)’, ‘German and Legal Studies (Mode B)’, ‘Hispanic Studies and Legal Studies (Mode A)’, ‘Hispanic Studies and Legal Studies (Mode B)’, ‘Legal Studies and Management Studies’, ‘Legal Studies and Psychology’.

Degree of Bachelor of Science

Introduction of new Honours programmes in Chemistry for the Offshore Industry, Chemistry with e-Chemistry, Biomedical Materials Chemistry

(C) Postgraduate Programmes

Law

Introduction of a new programme: LLM in Intellectual Property Law

RACE EQUALITY ACTION PLAN

751. In noting the University’s Race Equality Action Plan (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes), the Senate agreed that the index to the Plan should clearly indicate that the objectives were derived from the guidance provided by the Commission on Racial Equality, that many of them were necessarily aspirational and that the core of the plan was the set of actions described under the heading "task".

APPOINTMENT OF UNIVERSITY POSTGRADUATE OFFICER

752. The Senate approved a recommendation from the relevant Deans that Professor Alison Saunders be appointed as a University Postgraduate Officer for Arts & Social Sciences for three years from 1 October 2003 vice Professor Burgess, who would become Convener of the Academic Standards Committee (Postgraduate) from that date vice Professor Racey.

APPOINTMENT TO STANDING COMMITTEES

753. The Senate approved the appointment of members to Senate standing committees, Senate representatives on joint committees of the Senate with the Court, and Senate representatives on committees of the Court, for the academic year 2003-2004 (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

DEADLINE FOR REFUSAL OF CLASS CERTIFICATES

754. The Senate approved a recommendation that the deadline for the notification to the Registry of the refusal of Class Certificates for those courses that had been given approval by the relevant Academic Standards Committee to be exempt from the two-year trial period for the abolition of the Class Certificate system be as follows:-

First half-session courses: 5.00 p.m. on 19 December 2003, i.e. on the last day of the Winter Term

Second half-session courses: 5.00 p.m. on 18 May 2004, i.e. on the Tuesday following the last day of teaching.

 

 

 

 

CONSULTATION ON UNIVERSITY RESEARCH

755. The Senate noted a paper concerning three consultation documents on University Research, responses to which were invited by 1 September 2003 (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes). [Minute 744 above also refers].

GRADUATION CEREMONIES: NOVEMBER 2003

756. The Senate noted that degrees would be conferred at the Graduation Ceremonies in November 2003 as follows:-

Friday 28 November at 3.00 p.m.: Degrees in Arts & Social Sciences, Education, Divinity and Law

Saturday 29 November at 11.00 a.m.: Degrees in Science, Engineering and Medicine

 

ELECTION OF SENATE ASSESSORS TO THE UNIVERSITY COURT

757. The Senate noted that Professor LG Graham, Professor PR Beaumont and Mr SC Styles had been elected as Senate Assessors to the University Court for the period 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2007.

ELECTION OF SENATE ASSESSOR TO THE JOINT PLANNING, FINANCE AND ESTATES COMMITTEE

758. The Senate noted that Professor LG Graham had been re-elected as a Senate Assessor to the Joint Planning, Finance and Estates Committee for the period 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2007.

STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION : SABBATICAL ELECTIONS

759. The Senate noted that, in the recent Sabbatical Elections, the following had been elected to office with the Students’ Association for the academic year 2003/04:-

President : Ms Jenny Duncan

Vice-President (Advice & Support) : Mr David Donaldson

Vice-President (Finance & Commercial Services) : Mr Kenneth Miller

Vice-President (Sport) : Ms Louise Watt

Vice-President (Societies & Student Development) : Mr George Lang

GRADUATION CEREMONIES : JULY 2003

760. The Senate noted that the following would deliver graduation and laureation addresses at the July 2003 graduation ceremonies:-

Monday 7 July at 11.00 a.m.

Opening Address : Professor Houlihan

Honorary Graduand : Professor Alan Maynard (DSc) Promoter : Professor WC Smith

Graduation Address : Professor Maynard

Monday 7 July at 3.00 p.m.

Opening Address : Professor Houlihan

Honorary Graduand : Professor Edward Said (DLitt) Promoter : Dr B Fennell

Graduation Address : Professor Swanson

Tuesday 8 July at 11.00 a.m.

Opening Address : Professor Houlihan

Honorary Graduand : Sir Gerald Gordon (LLD) Promoter : Professor PR Duff

Honorary Graduand : The Rt Hon Lord MacLean (LLD) Promoter : Professor CHW Gane

Graduation Address : Sir Gerald Gordon

 

Tuesday 8 July at 3.00 p.m.

Opening Address : Principal

Honorary Graduand : Professor Sir Richard Doll (DSc) Promoter : Professor A Seaton

Graduation Address : Sir Richard Doll

Tuesday 8 July at 6.30 p.m.

Opening Address : Professor Sewel

Graduation Address : Principal

Wednesday 9 July at 11.00 a.m.

Opening Address : Principal

Honorary Graduand : Professor Crispin Wright (DLitt) Promoter : Professor LG Graham

Graduation Address : Professor Wright

Wednesday 9 July at 3.00 p.m.

Opening Address : Principal

Honorary Graduand : Professor Hugh Pennington (DSc) Promoter : Professor N Haites

Graduation Address : Professor Pennington

Thursday 10 July at 11.00 a.m.

Opening Address : Principal

Graduation Address : Chancellor

Thursday 10 July at 3.00 p.m.

Opening Address : Principal

Honorary Graduand : Professor Averil Cameron (DLitt) Promoter : Professor IR Torrance

Honorary Graduand : Ms Barbara Rae (DLitt) Promoter : Professor IR Torrance

Graduation Address : Professor Cameron

Thursday 10 July at 6.30 p.m.

Opening Address : Dr JG Roberts

Honorary Graduand : The Very Revd John Cairns (DD) Promoter : Professor IR Torrance

Honorary Graduand : The Revd Canon John Webster (DD) Promoter : Professor FB Watson

Graduation Address : Canon Webster

Friday 11 July at 11.00 a.m.

Opening Address : Professor Houlihan

Honorary Graduand : Professor Ian Isherwood (DSc) Promoter : Professor PF Sharp

Graduation Address : Professor Isherwood

GRADUATIONS IN ABSENTIA

761.1 The Senate noted that a list of those qualified to receive degrees, diplomas and certificates who had applied to have them conferred in absentia could be obtained from the Senate Office of the Registry. (copy filed with the principal copy of the Minutes).

761.2 Senate conferred the degrees on, and awarded the diplomas and other qualifications to, the persons stated.

 

PRESIDENT OF THE STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

762. In closing the Senate meeting, the Principal expressed his thanks to Mr Cockburn for all his work for the Students’ Association and the University during his two years as President of the Students’ Association. He indicated that Mr Cockburn had enjoyed a remarkable two years and expressed his good wishes for the future. The Senate endorsed the Principal’s comments with acclamation.