Who cares?

Who cares? The impact of changing workforce patterns in UK paediatric intensive care services on staff practice and patient outcomes

Investigators

Tucker, J. (Division of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen) Parry, G., Jones, S. (School of Health and Related Research, Sheffield) Draper, E., Davey, N. (Health Sciences, Leicester), McKee, L. (HSRU, University of Aberdeen), Skåtun, D.(HERU), Darowski, M. (Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust)

Summary

The study considered 12 paediatric intensive care units. It compared units with and without new extended nursing roles (i.e. nurses undertaking tasks previously outwith normal nursing practice). It compared the impact of differing proportions of total staff time and staff groups’ time in direct patient care in relation to quality of care and patient satisfaction, while taking account of variations in the initial illness severity of patients. Towards ensuring sustainable and high quality services in high-tech acute hospital settings, it explored how best to manage human resources, support staff development in new ways of working, and compares staff wellbeing and costs. There was no evidence of a significant independent effect of higher extended nursing roles on staff groups, direct care time, care process or outcomes for patients.

Contact

D Skåtun

Status

Complete

Publications

Tucker, J., Parry, G., Draper, E., Mckee, L. and Skåtun, D. The impact of changing workforce patterns in UK paediatric intensive care services on staff practice and patient outcomes” Final report National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery Organisation Programme. March 2009.

Presentations

Coleby, D., Tucker, J., Draper, E., Parry, G., McKee, L, Skåtun, D., Davey, N. and Darowski, M. The UK PICU Staffing Study: a comparison of workforce wellbeing in units with and without extended nursing roles. "Delivering better health services" Health Services Research Network and National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation (NIHR SDO) Programme annual conference. Manchester. June 2008.