PhD: Studies of the job satisfaction and labour supply of hospital consultants

PhD: Studies of the job satisfaction and labour supply of hospital consultants

Consultants are part of a team of medical and non-medical personnel involved in the production of healthcare and are paid to deliver a specific minimum number of hours of their labour to the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom (UK). This thesis explored issues around motivation, and specifically looks at the effects of pay and non-pay factors on the labour supply of consultants in NHS Scotland, using data from two national surveys of consultants conducted in Scotland. It is written as three distinct empirical chapters looking at determinants of job satisfaction, and the supply of (usual and extra) labour by consultants in NHS Scotland before and after new consultant contracts were introduced.

Outcome and translation

PhD Awarded in November 2010. This research found that pay increases for consultants only result in small increases in hours worked. Those currently working above the median number of hours are much less responsive to changes in earnings.

PhD Student: Divine Ikenwilo

Supervisors: Anthony Scott, Matt Sutton, Diane Skåtun, Bob Elliott (HERU)

Publications

Ikenwilo, D. (2010)‘Studies of the job satisfaction and labour supply of hospital consultants, PhD Thesis, University of Aberdeen, 2010.

Ikenwilo, D., Scott, A. (2007) ‘The effects of pay and job satisfaction on the labour supply of hospital consultants’, Health Economics, vol 16 (12), 1303–1318.

Presentations

PhD and internal HERU seminars and conference presentation (iHEA Beijing, 2009).

 

Ikenwilo, D. (2009) 'Longitudinal data analyses of normal and extra contracted hours among senior doctors following contractual reform', 7th World Congress of the IHEA. July 2009.