Internal labour markets and promotion in the medical profession

Internal labour markets and promotion in the medical profession

Investigators

Scott, A. and Mavromaras, K. (HERU)

Summary

This study examined the determinants of promotion to hospital consultant from a number of perspectives. The first was whether promotion to consultant in a given year is influenced by ‘effort’ expended in the years prior to promotion. This tests the hypothesis of whether the career structure provides incentives or whether promotion to consultant is automatic. The study also examined gender differences in promotion. Using individual panel level data from 1990 to 2000, fixed effects logistic regression models are used to examine these issues. Findings suggests that there is a robust gender differential in promotions, with males more likely to be promoted than females. There was weak evidence of incentives in promotions; those who work part-time are less likely to be promoted and those who do academic/research work are more likely to be promoted.

Contact

D Skåtun

Status

Complete

Publications

Mavromaras, K.G.and Scott, A. Promotion to hospital consultant in NHS Scotland. International Journal of Manpower. 2005; 26(7/8): 660-672.

Mavromaras, K.G. and Scott, A. Promotion to hospital consultant: regression analysis using NHS administrative data. British Medical Journal. 2006; 332: 148-151.

Presentations

Scott, A. and Mavromaras, K.G. Incentives in medical careers. Centre for Health Economics, Monash University. Victoria. July 2005.

Scott, A. and Mavromaras, K.G. Incentives in medical careers. School of Population Health, University of Melbourne. August 2005.

Scott, A. and Mavromaras, K.G. Incentives in medical careers. Melbourne Institute University of Melbourne. May 2005.