Using discrete choice experiments to investigate optimal skill mix

Using discrete choice experiments to investigate optimal skill mix

With increasing demands on health services policy is looking at alternative ways of providing healthcare. Examples include extending the role of pharmacists and nurses in the management of common ailments, promoting self-care of symptoms indicative of self-limiting illness, and extending the roles of specialist nurses and physician associates in some clinical areas. We use discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to investigate preferences in the management of different illnesses.  

Outcome and Translation

A general finding is that, whilst individuals often prefer to see a doctor or consultant, improvements in other aspects of care (reduced waiting time, continuity of care, longer consultation times) can compensate them for not seeing their preferred health worker. 

HERU researchers involved in this research project: Mandy Ryan, Verity Watson and Patrícia Norwood.

External collaborators: Terry Porteous, Christine Bond, Alison Elliott, Phil Hannaford and Peter Murchie (Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen)

Publications

Porteous, T., Ryan, M., Bond, C. and Hannaford, P. (2006) 'Preferences for self-care or consulting a health professional in minor illness: a discrete choice experiment', British Journal of General Practice, 56, 911-917.

Ryan, M. and Porteous, T. Preferences for self-care or consulting a health professional in minor illness. HERU Briefing Paper, University of Aberdeen, July 2007.

Rennie, L. Patient preferences for managing different types of symptoms - self-care or health professional advice? A discrete choice experiment. Thesis presented for the degree of Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BScMedSci). University of Aberdeen, May 2010.

Rennie, L., Porteous, T. and Ryan, M. (2012) 'Preferences for managing symptoms of differing severity: a discrete choice experiment', Value in Health, 15(8), 1069-1076.

Murchie, P., Norwood, P. F., Pietrucin-Materek, M., Porteous, T., Hannaford, P. C. and Ryan, M. (2016) 'Determining cancer survivors' preferences to inform new models of follow-up care', British Journal of Cancer, 115, 1495-1503.

Norwood, P., Ryan, M., Murchie, P., Pietrucin-Materek, M., Porteous, T. and Hannaford, P. (2017) 'Survivors of cancer seeking care continuity and lengthier appointments', HERU Policy Brief, University of Aberdeen, March 2017.

 

Presentations

Porteous, T. and Ryan, M. (2006) 'Factors influencing the choice between self-care and health professional advice in minor illness: a discrete choice experiment' Health Sciences Research and Pharmacy Practice Conference, University of Bath, April 2006.

Porteous, T. and Ryan, M. (2006) 'Factors influencing the choice between self-care and health professional advice in minor illness: a discrete choice experiment', Social Dimensions of Health Institute Conference, University of Dundee, May 2006.

McAteer, A., Elliott, A.M., Yi, D., Watson, V. and Ryan, M. (2009) 'Investigation preferences for symptom management using Discrete Choice Experiment', [poster] Society for Academic Primary Care Conference, St Andrews, July 2009.

Rennie, L., Porteous, T. and Ryan, M. (2011) 'Preferences for managing different types of symptoms – self care or health professional advice?', Health Services and Pharmacy Practice Research Conference, Norwich, May 2011.

Pietrucin-Materek, M., Murchie, P., Porteous, T. and Hannaford, P. C. (2012) 'What do cancer patients want from their follow up? A discrete choice experiment (DCE) study to investigate preferences for cancer follow-up amongst people with breast, prostate, colorectal cancer and cutaneous melanoma', [poster] Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) Celebrating Difference Conference, Glasgow, October 2012.