PhD: Broadening the valuation space in health technology assessment

PhD: Broadening the valuation space in health technology assessment: the case of monitoring individuals with ocular hypertension

This thesis investigated alternative approaches to incorporate discrete choice experiment (DCE) outcomes (e.g. willingness to pay) into decision analytic models (e.g. discrete event simulation models) within the framework of a cost-benefit analysis.

Health Technology Assessment in the UK has been dominated by cost-utility analysis. For example, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) both advocate the use of EQ-5D-based Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) to value benefits within an economic evaluation). This approach does not take account of factors beyond health outcomes; such factors have been shown to be important in the delivery of health care. Whilst DCEs have been extensively used to value such factors, their application within a decision analytic model framework is limited. This PhD incorporates the outcomes of a DCE (willingness to pay values) into a decision analytic model.

The case study is Optimal surveillance regimes for individuals with ocular hypertension (OHT): modelling and economic evaluation

This PhD project crosses themes and is also featured in the Assessment of Technologies portfolio of research, within the 'Methodological Projects' section.

PhD student: Rodolfo Hernández

Supervisors: Mandy Ryan (HERU), Jen Burr (St Andrews University) and Luke Vale (Newcastle University)

Publications

Burr, J.M., Botello-Pinzon, P., Takwoingi, Y., Hernandez, R., Vazquez-Montes, M., Elders, A., Asaoka, R., Banister, K., van der Schoot, J., Fraser, C., King, A., Lemij, H., Sanders, R., Vernon, S., Tuulonen, A., Kotecha, A., Glasziou, P., Garway-Heath, D., Crabb, D., Vale, L., Azuara-Blanco, A., Perera, R., Ryan, M., Deeks, J. and Cook, J. (2012) 'Surveillance for ocular hypertension: an evidence synthesis and economic evaluation', Health Technology Assessment, 16(29).

Hernández, R. (2016) 'Broadening the valuation space in health technology assessment: the case of monitoring individuals with ocular hypertension', PhD Thesis, HERU, University of Aberdeen.

Hernández, R., Burr, J.M., Vale, L., Azuara-Blanco, A., Cook, J.A., Banister, K., Tuulonen, A. and Ryan, M. (2016) ‘Monitoring ocular hypertension, how much and how often? A cost-effectiveness perspective,’ British Journal of Ophthalmology, 100, 1263-1268.

Presentations

Hernández, R., Ryan, M., Vale, L., Botello Pinzon, A., Burr, J. (2012) 'Incorporating discrete choice experiments into an economic evaluation: a case study of preferences for alternative monitoring services for individuals with ocular hypertension', Health Economists Study Group Meeting, Oxford, 25-27 June 2012.

Hernández, R., Vale, L., Ryan, M. and Burr, J. M. (2014) 'Incorporating results from a discrete choice experiment into a discrete event simulation model', 1st Meeting of the International Academy of Health Preference Research, Amsterdam, 8 November 2014.

Hernández, R. (2016) 'Broadening the valuation space in health technology assessment: the case of monitoring individuals with ocular hypertension', Health Economics Group Seminar, Newcastle University, Newcastle, England, 30 June 2016.