PhD: Testing methods to value health outcomes in low income countries

PhD: Testing methods to value health outcomes in low income countries using contingent valuation and discrete choice experiment methods

This PhD contributed to the small body of literature on the application of CV and DCEs in low-income countries and in populations which have little or no formal education. Theoretical validity was examined by testing whether willingness to pay corresponded to theoretical expectations focussing on gender and willingness to pay, sensitivity to scope, starting point bias, and strategic bias in CV. The theoretical validity of the DCE method in populations with no formal education was also explored.

Outcome and Translation

Both CV and DCEs were found to be feasible and valid in populations with low levels of education when surveys were conducted using trained enumerators, administered using face-to-face interviews and using visual aids. However, iterative methods to elicit willingness to pay were prone to starting point bias and strategic bias.

PhD Student: Laura Ternent

Supervisors: Paul McNamee (HERU)

Publications

Ternent, L, McNamee, P, Newlands, D. Belemsaga, D., Gbangou, A. Willingness to pay for maternal health outcomes. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy. 2010; 8(2), 99-109.

McNamee, P., Ternent, L., Gbangou, A. and Newlands, D A game of two halves?: Incentive incompatibility, starting point bias and the bidding game contingent valuation method. Health Economics. 2010, 19(1), 75-87.

Ternent, L. (2012) 'Testing methods to value health outcomes in low income countries using contingent valuation and discrete choice experiment methods', PhD Thesis, University of Aberdeen.

Presentations

Ternent, L. (2006) ‘Examining gender issues in willingness to pay‘, 6th INDEPTH Annual General Scientific Meeting, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, September 2006.

McNamee, P., Ternent, L., Belemsaga, D., Gbangou, A., Newlands, D. (2006) ‘Assessing the value of maternal health using contingent valuation methods‘, 6th INDEPTH Annual General Scientific Meeting, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, September 2006.

McNamee, P., Ternent, L., Belemsaga, D., Gbangou, A. and Newlands, D. (2007) ‘A game of two halves? Starting point bias within the bidding game method.’ Paper presented to the Health Economists Study Group Conference, Birmingham, January 2007.

Ternent, L. (2007) ‘Willingness to pay for maternal health care: a gender perspective.’ The Immpact International Symposium, RCOG, London, February 2007.

Ternent, L., McNamee, P., Newlands, D., Belemsaga, D., Gbangou, A. (2007) ‘How important is gender in assessing the value of maternal health outcomes?’ Paper presented to the Health Economists Study Group Conference, Birmingham, January 2007.

Ternent, L., Daniels, A., Newlands, D. (2007) ‘Using discrete choice experiments to elicit preferences for maternal health care in Ghana‘, poster presented at the 6th World Congress of Health Economics, International Health Economics Association, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 2007.

Ternent, L. (2007) ‘Testing methods to value health outcomes in developing countries using stated preference methods‘, University of Aberdeen Postgraduate Symposium, June 2007.

Ternent, L., Daniels, A., Newlands, D. and McNamee, P. (2009) ‘Using discrete choice experiments to elicit preferences for maternal health outcomes in Ghana’, AfHEA, Ghana, March 2009.

Ternent, L., Newlands, D., McNamee, P. (2014) ‘Willingness to pay and sensitivity to scope’, African Health Economics Association, Kenya, 2014.