Choice and targeting of lifestyle interventions to prevent disease

Economic appraisal of the choice and targeting of lifestyle interventions to prevent disease in deprived populations

The likelihood that conditions such as heart disease, cancers, diabetes and strokes will occur can be affected by the lifestyles that we adopt – such as smoking, over-eating, not taking enough exercise, etc. This study provides information for policy makers, the NHS and individuals about which interventions to change unhealthy behaviours are effective, as well as cost-effective. Such information will assist in making decisions about how best to use the limited resources available to improve the health of the nation. The consequences (in terms of ill health and costs) of different types of lifestyle are affected by an individual’s personal circumstances and the environment in which they live. It is these factors that either promote or provide barriers to an individual changing their behaviour.

The main research questions addressed were: the contribution of different lifestyle factors to ill health and mortality that might be prevented; how this preventable ill health varies between different areas and different social groups who differ in the amount of deprivation they suffer; and the relative costs and benefits of alternative ways of changing behaviour and their impacts on health inequalities.

Outcome and Translation

A novel approach was developed to addressing the role of lifestyles and life circumstances in preventable diseases using econometric analysis of linked survey and hospitalisation data and the results were integrated into an economic evaluation framework. This study developed information for policy makers, the NHS and individuals about which interventions to change unhealthy behaviours are effective, as well as cost-effective, and how these might be targeted to reduce health inequalities.

HERU researchers involved in this research project: Anne Ludbrook, Dami Olajide, Barbara Eberth and Luke Vale

External collaborators: P Boyle, (University of St. Andrews); D Stockton, (ISD) and P Craig (Scottish Government Health Directorates)

Publications

Eberth, B. and Smith, M.D. (2010) 'Modelling the participation decision and duration of sporting activity in Scotland', Economic Modelling, 27(4), 822-834.

Eberth, B. and Smith, M.D. (2010) 'Modelling the participation decision and duration of sporting activity in Scotland', HERU Briefing Paper, University of Aberdeen, November 2010

Eberth, B., Olajide, D., Craig, P. and Ludbrook, A. (2014) 'Smoking-related disease risk, area deprivation and health behaviours', Journal of Public Health, 36(1), 72-80.

Presentations

Eberth, B. and Smith, MD. (2008) ‘Modelling sporting activity in Scotland’, Health Econometrics Workshop, Milan, Italy, December 2008.

Eberth, B. and Smith, MD. (2009) ‘Modelling the participation decision and the time spent on sporting activity in Scotland’, Scottish Economic Society Annual Conference, Perth, April 2009.

Olajide, D., Ludbrook, A., and Smith, M. (2010) ‘Will quitting smoking and taking up a sport improve your diet? Investigating spillover effects of health behaviour interventions’, UK Society for Behavioural Medicine (NPRI), Leeds, December 2010.

Ludbrook, A. (2011) ‘Economic appraisal of the choice and targeting of lifestyle interventions to prevent disease in deprived populations’, Chief Scientist Office Workshop, Measuring, Understanding and Tackling Health Inequalities: New Insights from Scottish Research, Edinburgh, February 2011.

Olajide, D. and Eberth, B. (2011) ‘Modelling time to incidence of smoking related diseases: a sample selection approach using linked hospitalisation data’, Scottish Economic Society Conference, Perth, April 2011.

Olajide, D. and Eberth, B. (2011) ‘Modelling time to incidence of smoking related diseases: a sample selection approach using linked hospitalisation data’, Scottish Health Informatics Programme Conference, Exploiting Existing Data for Health Research, St Andrews, September 2011.

Eberth, B., Olajide, D. and Ludbrook, A. (2011) ‘Smoking related disease risk and lifestyle behaviours,’ Faculty of Public Health Conference, Aviemore, November 2011.

Olajide, D., Ludbrook, A. and Eberth, B. (2011) ‘Patterns of drinking behaviour and incidence of diseases amongst Scottish adults’, Faculty of Public Health Conference, Aviemore, November 2011.

Ludbrook, A., Smith, MD., Vale, L., Craig, P., Stockton, D., Popham, F., Olajide, D., Eberth, B. and Yi, D. (2011) ‘Economic appraisal of the choice and targeting of lifestyle interventions to prevent disease in deprived populations’, UK Society for Behavioural Medicine / NPRI, Stirling, December 2011.

Ludbrook, A. (2012) ‘Health behaviours and health inequalities: what should be targeted?’, Institute of Health & Society Seminar, Newcastle, May 2012.

Olajide, D, Ludbrook, A. and Eberth B. (2012) ‘Analysis of multiple risky behaviours and associated disease outcomes using Scottish linked hospitalisation data’, NHESG, Kuopio, Finland, August 2012.

Olajide, D. and Ludbrook, A. (2012) ‘Patterns of multiple health behaviours and associated disease outcomes amongst Scottish adults: a latent class regression approach’, Faculty of Public Health Conference, Crieff, November 2012.

Yi, D., Vale, L., Ludbrook, A. and Olajide, D. (2012) ‘Cost effectiveness analysis of smoking intervention programmes in Scotland: impact of health behaviour and deprivation’, [Poster] UK Society for Behavioural Medicine Conference, Manchester, December 2012.

Olajide, D. and Ludbrook, A. (2013) ‘Modelling risk of smoking related disease linked to deprivation: comparison of two linked data sets’, ScottisH Informatics Programme (SHIP) International Conference: Exploiting Existing Data for Health Research, St Andrews, August 2013.