Seminars

HERU regularly invites colleagues in the health economics profession to the department to disseminate research findings and new techniques in the field of health economics. Note that these HERU External Seminars are open to all. Location details are posted in the HERU Events Diary. 

Please note that HERU External Seminars are currently online events.


2020/2021 Programme

  • 14 October 2020, Associate Professor Richard Norman, Curtin University, Perth, Australia. Title: Using DCEs to value health for economic evaluation: state of play and future challenges. This event took place online via MS Teams. 

  • 22 April 2021Dr Dean Regier, Senior Scientist, Cancer Control Research, BC Cancer / Assistant Professor, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia. Title: Resource allocation for genomics and rare disease diagnosis: where we were and next steps for evaluation.

    This event took place online via MS Teams and a recording of the presentation is available.

  • 30 June 2021, 11am-12pm, Jonathan Sicsic, Assistant Professor in Economics, Paris University Institute of Technology, France. Title: Coherent but arbitrary: understanding ordering effects in health preference elicitation tasks. Online via MS Teams. 

  • 28 July 2021, 3pm-4pm, Professor Deborah Marshall, University of Calgary. Title: Applications and use of DCEs in decision making. This event took place online via MS Teams. 

  • 11 August 2021, 11am-12pm, Lisa Norrgren, PhD student in Economics, University of Gothenburg. Title: Time preference, illness and death. 

Abstract: This presentation investigates the predictive power of time preferences on the risk of early mortality and illness in adulthood. Using a unique cohort of 12,956 individuals born in 1953, interviewed in 1966 and followed with register data up to 2018, it finds that patient adolescents are less likely to die before age 65. The coefficient size is approximately one-sixth to one-fifth of the total mortality by age 65. Patient adolescents have on average 0.6 fewer hospitalizations and 1.5 fewer diagnoses in their adult life and are less likely to be diagnosed with conditions associated with lifestyle risk factors. Patient adolescents are also more in favour of health-promoting interests and rules. The main investigated channel for the relationship between time preference and future health is lifestyle. Other suggested channels are the mother’s time preferences, and the adolescent’s education attainment and future income. Adding education and income reduces the coefficient of time preference on early mortality by 25%. 

Online via MS Teams. Contact Lesley Innes for a registration link.

Recent previous HERU seminars

2019/20
  • 8 October 2019, Sebastian Neumann-Böhme, PhD Candidate, Department of Health Economics, Erasmus School of Health Policy and Management, Erasmus University Rotterdam. Health Sciences-115, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Trust me; I know what I am doing. Does domain experience reduce preference reversals in decision making for others?

  • 4 November 2019, Dr Yuanyuan Gu, Marie Sklodowska-Curie Experienced Research Fellow, University of York. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Patient choice, hospital quality and surgical urgency: a discrete choice experiment.

  • 14 January 2020, Dr Tobias Borger, Lecturer in Economics, University of Stirling. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Preferences for coastal and marine conservation in Vietnam: accounting for differences in individual choice set formation.

  • 4 February 2020, Jamie O’Halloran, PhD Student, Danish Centre for Health Economics, University of Southern Denmark. HSB-115, Health Services Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.00pm-1.00pm. Title: Time to retire? Changes in GP behaviour prior to retirement.  

  • 14 May 2020, Dr Cesar Revoredo Giha, Senior Economist and Team Leader, Land Economy, Environment and Society Research Group, Scotland's Rural College. 1pm-2pm. Title: Prices, marketing and food choices.
    This event took place online via MS Teams. 

  • 11 June 2020, Dr Heather Brown, Senior Lecturer, University of Newcastle. 1pm-2pm. Title: Food standard hygiene rating data: a longitudinal data set to evaluate changes in the food environment over time.
    This event took place online via MS Teams. 

2018/19
  • 2 October 2018, Dr Philip Kinghorn, University of Birmingham. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 1pm-2pm. Title: Methods for eliciting a monetary threshold for public spending on social care and public health: arbitrated deliberative versus individual citizen values.

  • 29 October 2018, Professor Julie Ratcliffe, Professor of Health Economics, Institute for Choice, School of Business, University of South Australia. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 11am-12pm. Title: Best worst scaling versus traditional ranking generated preferences for attributes of quality of life. One and the same or different? An empirical investigation in an Australian general population sample.

  • 4 December 2018, Lucy Abel, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Making sense of the maze: primary care diagnostics require new methods to assess cost-effectiveness.

  • 6 December 2018, Dr Anikó Bíró, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Economics Centre for Economic and Regional Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Rm3:052, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 2pm-3pm. Title: Effect of caesarean delivery on the use of antidepressants.

  • 14 January 2019, Dr Seamus Kent, Senior Researcher, Health Economics Research Centre, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12pm-1pm. Title: Food on prescription: should total diet replacement programmes be provided by the NHS?

  • 5 February 2019, Dr Laura Cornelsen, Assistant Professor in Public Health Economics and MRC Career Development Fellow, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Framing and signalling effects of taxes on sugary drinks: a Discrete Choice Experiment among households in Great Britain.

  • 12 March 2019, Elizabeth Lemmon, Research Fellow, Department of Economics, University of Stirling. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Variations in domiciliary free personal care across Scottish local authorities.

  • 14 May 2019, Chiara Pastore, PhD student, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. Title: Human capital consequences of missing out on a grammar school education.

  • 28 May 2019, Dr David Meads, Associate Professor, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds. Health Services Building, Rm115, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 1.00pm-2.00pm. Title: Exploring the impact of choice on cost-effectiveness: A case study in community intravenous antibiotics for infections.

  • 11 June 2019, Dr Anna Heath, Bio-statistician, Child Health Evaluative Sciences, SickKids Hospital, Toronto and Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto. Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Statistical Science, University College London. Rm1:029, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, University of Aberdeen. 12.30pm-1.30pm. (Sandwich lunch available from 12:15). Title: Value of information as a tool for clinical trial design.